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Mumbai Artist Retreat is a rural retreat for artists wanting to work in nature while keeping the city skyline in sight, with a view of Mumbai’s metropolitan centre from across the sea.

In light of the fact of increasing sea levels, a question arises as to how do you cope with densification and population growth in these areas? Coastal locations are frequently appealing from the standpoint of livelihood or favourable environmental circumstances.

Photo by Randhir Singh
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It is therefore critical for architects to assess when building work is required since it provides resilience in the face of an uncertain future.

It should also use construction methods and materials that have a low impact on the vulnerable ecosystems.

In this regard, the Mumbai Artist Retreat, located on the other side of the Mumbai Bay, is typical. Because it is difficult to reach, it retains its rural, agricultural flavour. In contrast to the rest of Mumbai, it still has some sort of beach to speak about.

It acts like a refuge from the global metropole’s severe physical and psychological demands. It does, however, seem connected to the city because of the Mumbai skyline over the water.

The project, which was designed and built by architects adjacent to the sea in Mumbai Bay, is an attempt by Architecture Brio to combine the allure of living by the water with the threat of climate change.

A low-lying coconut palm farm near a beach was chosen as the site.

It suffers from salty ground water in the summer months due to a declining ground water table. A water collecting pond in the centre of the property recharges the ground water table with sweet water in order to refill the ground water table.

Furthermore, the pond attracts a large number of fish and birds. The site’s programming was defined by the architects into three zones that run the length of the property: a temporary residential zone, a workplace zone, and a long-term residential zone. To accommodate these operations, the proposal offers a series of temporary buildings.

The buildings comprise of long- and short-term artist housing, a canteen, and a flexible, central area for workshops and other resident activities. The workshop is the focal point of the design.

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Photo by Randhir Singh

It is separated into two adjacent volumes with interiors that may be left open and flowing or converted to different functions with the use of timber screen dividers. There is a mezzanine in one of them.

To minimise disruption to local animals, the lightweight steel structure of stilts, beams, and columns was constructed off-site and fitted together with a nut and bolt method.

The two pyramid-shaped roofs, which have blunt tops and house two skylights, are supported by V-shaped bamboo beams.

The architect, Verrijt, adds that the workshop’s figure is inspired by a Sri Lankan ambalama. “A lovely, delicate pavilion at the edge of a rice field [traditionally used as a traveller’s rest stop] that speaks to the landscape and allows the space to flow.

Photo by Randhir Singh

So we wanted to design something that is extremely light, with a basic structure of columns; a roof that is quite dominating, almost like an industrial space; and light in the workshop’s core, where we installed skylights that collect north light”, he says.

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Photography by Edmund Sumner

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Sabeena Karnik is a paper art creator that celebrates hand-crafted labour by making each of her paper typography pieces with immense meticulous detail and finesse.

Paper Art by Sabeena Karnik

Sabeena Karnik is a paper artist specializing in 3D lettering and illustrations. She is an Independent illustrator/ typographer specializing in paper sculpting and 3D illustration. Sabeena loves working with paper and exploring its endless possibilities for the past ten years.

Her expertise stems from her education in applied art with a typography major from Sophia Polytechnic in Mumbai. In her ten years career until now she has worked with Google, Adobe, Instagram, Disney, Oppo, Tanishq, Porsche and many more high-profile clients.

Paper Art by Sabeena Karnik

Sabeena Karnik’s inspiration stems from her childhood, her travel diaries and nature. Explore her creative process behind her spell-bounding work in this interview with CreativeGaga.

CG. Please tell us about your childhood memories, education and professional experiences.

Sabeena. As a child, I was always into art and drawing. So it was a natural decision to pursue an education in art too. I studied applied art with a typography major from Sophia Polytechnic in Mumbai. Became a professional paper artist 10 years ago after realising this is my true calling. Over the past decade, I’ve had the pleasure to work with Google, Adobe, Instagram, Disney, Oppo, Tanishq, Porsche and many others. I create artworks purely with paper which are then photographed and used commercially across various mediums such as advertising, editorial, digital campaigns and more

Paper Art by Sabeena Karnik

CG. How did you find your passion for paper artistry?

Sabeena. I have always been passionate about lettering and paper art since my learning years. In art college, I decided to major in typography and also created my final year campaign using paper. So that was the starting point for paper artistry in my life. I just didn’t know what the next course of action was until many years later when I started combining the two of them.

Paper Art by Sabeena Karnik

CG. Where did you get your start of building your illustrious career?

Sabeena. The start happened with a personal project in the year 2010 when I decided to experiment by making the entire alphabet A-Z using paper. It was a fun thrilling experience of combining the two things I love. Little did I know it would be noticed by advertising agencies and I would be hired to create paper types for them. I hadn’t even completed the entire series when I got my first commercial project. Slowly and with time I started to get more assignments which made me sit up and think that maybe I can do this professionally.

How does the creative process behind your spell-bounding creations differ with each paper artwork?

Sabeena. The creative process is the same for each project. Of Course, the brief is different so the theme varies. But the basic process is the same as sketching my rough ideas first and eventually creating the piece with paper

CG. Which type of paper is your preferred choice to use in creating paper art?

Sabeena. I use all kinds of paper for my work. Some stiffness and weight is preferred for certain projects. Generally, the decision is made based on colours. I don’t use any specific brands but a lot of Italian ones have a great variety.

CG. How did you feel when your artwork was showcased and you were celebrated as an artist on the cover of Verve Magazine?

Sabeena. The Verve collaboration was unreal and I still cannot believe it happened. Nevertheless, I feel incredibly humbled and honoured that my paper art has been recognised in ways I never imagined.

Paper Art by Sabeena Karnik

CG. How does a travel destination inspire you to create your novel hand paintings?

Sabeena. Travel and sketching go hand in hand for me. It’s the best way to take in the beauty of a place instead of just snapping a photo. When I draw I’m observing the details, the atmosphere and put down my interpretation of what I see in front of me. It’s the most intimate experience of creation.

Paper Art by Sabeena Karnik

CG. How do your paper designs hit the bullseye with your clients?

Sabeena. I don’t know, maybe the fact that it’s all handcrafted and nothing is created digitally sets it apart. In an age where everything has gone digital, going back to your roots using your hands with different materials to create is always going to be unique even if it takes time and doesn’t produce instant results. It’s a labour of love… using patience and skills will always make you stand out.

CG. When your paper art pieces are in mass circulation for everyone to see and experience, what kind of details do you make sure are evident in your designs?

Sabeena. I don’t focus on the finer details as much as the bigger picture as a whole. By and large, it’s the vibrancy, movement and craftsmanship that I stress on. It matters to me how the viewer feels when they see my work. Are they surprised, do they feel happy and inspired? I want the visual to linger in their minds long after they have seen it.

CG. Where do you seek inspiration for creating paper artistry?

Sabeena. Inspiration comes from everywhere but mostly from nature, its colours and textures. I don’t have to look far to be inspired. Lines and forms are all around us. The way light falls on them to create shadows and shapes is so fascinating. I try to bring that into my work as much as I can.

CG. What do you look forward to creating through your paper art?

Sabeena. I wish to create work that communicates a deeper meaning than what meets the eye. A way to change people’s perspective, bring about awareness and upliftment. I want to do larger work and go bigger if possible.

You can uncover the meticulously crafted paper art of Sabeena Karnik on Behance and follow along her creative journey on Instagram.

 

And for more exciting behind the scenes coverage of other artists & illustrators from around the world be sure to follow Creative Gaga on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and LinkedIn.

Published in Issue 34

This is a rebranding special issue focused on finding the answers to some of the basic questions like what is the right time for re-branding? or what all needs changing and how exactly? We interviewed some of the best branding studios like Landor Mumbai, Elephant, VGC, Inchwork, and many more. If you are considering rebranding or want to learn more about the art of doing it then this issue is a must read. So, go ahead

 

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Khyati Trehan
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Khyati Trehan is an Indian graphic designer and a 3D visual artist based in the heart of India, New Delhi. She graduated from the National Institute of Design, Ahmedabad and has since gone on to work across disciplines, often exploring the limit of all visuals for clients including Instagram, Snapchat, New Yorker Magazine, the New York Times, Samsung, PRINT, WeWork, Adobe and Apple.


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With pandemic, varients, and lockdowns, the year 2021 has not been kind to most of us, especially those who have lost more than just freedom. Despite all the challenges, adapting to new ways of learning and working, honing many new skills, this year’s design graduates are having uniques issues. This issue focuses on 2021 design graduates to help them shine in some spotlight, whose talent you can surely see through their portfolios.

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Nidhi Isaac
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Specializing in integrated branding, Nidhi Isaac strives to bring progressive, human-centered thinking to brands, creatively with a lasting impact. Over the last 13 years, she has worked across Design, Advertising, and Television, creating stories, systems, experiences, and brands, across a broad range of industries. At Elephant Design, in her role as Director: Brand and Design, she solves complex business and consumer challenges, working with executive clients to co-create brand-led business transformations.

 

A graduate from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, USA, she has also led workshops on branding for NASSCOM, guest lectured at MIT, WeSchool, and led a course in branding for Srishti School of Art, Design, and
Technology.


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With pandemic, varients, and lockdowns, the year 2021 has not been kind to most of us, especially those who have lost more than just freedom. Despite all the challenges, adapting to new ways of learning and working, honing many new skills, this year’s design graduates are having uniques issues. This issue focuses on 2021 design graduates to help them shine in some spotlight, whose talent you can surely see through their portfolios.

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Nipen Bhuyan
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Nipen Bhuyan is an illustrator deeply influenced by his hometown, Arunachal Pradesh. Book covers, posters and Hike stickers are some of his prime works. Loves commissions and personal projects equally, just as he loves nature and dreams.


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With pandemic, varients, and lockdowns, the year 2021 has not been kind to most of us, especially those who have lost more than just freedom. Despite all the challenges, adapting to new ways of learning and working, honing many new skills, this year’s design graduates are having uniques issues. This issue focuses on 2021 design graduates to help them shine in some spotlight, whose talent you can surely see through their portfolios.

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Nikhil Kumar
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A strong believer of simplistic and uncomplicated yet impactful visual communication. Recently graduated from MIT Institute of Design, Pune.


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With pandemic, varients, and lockdowns, the year 2021 has not been kind to most of us, especially those who have lost more than just freedom. Despite all the challenges, adapting to new ways of learning and working, honing many new skills, this year’s design graduates are having uniques issues. This issue focuses on 2021 design graduates to help them shine in some spotlight, whose talent you can surely see through their portfolios.

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Sampada Inamdar
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Somewhere between practical and empathetic, loves to work on ideas people relate to. Sampada Inamdar recently graduated in B Des. (Graphic Design) from MIT Institute of Design, Pune.


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With pandemic, varients, and lockdowns, the year 2021 has not been kind to most of us, especially those who have lost more than just freedom. Despite all the challenges, adapting to new ways of learning and working, honing many new skills, this year’s design graduates are having uniques issues. This issue focuses on 2021 design graduates to help them shine in some spotlight, whose talent you can surely see through their portfolios.

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Shagnik Chakraborty
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Shagnik Chakraborty, loves linguistics and philosophy alongside typography and design publication. He recently graduated from MIT Institute of Design, Pune in B Des. (Graphic Design).


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With pandemic, varients, and lockdowns, the year 2021 has not been kind to most of us, especially those who have lost more than just freedom. Despite all the challenges, adapting to new ways of learning and working, honing many new skills, this year’s design graduates are having uniques issues. This issue focuses on 2021 design graduates to help them shine in some spotlight, whose talent you can surely see through their portfolios.

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