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The new Euro Cup logo is out. Recently launched in the virtual space through social media, UEFA made its call for a non-racist 2024 Euros loud and clear.

After the 2022 football World Cup, the 2024 Euros is the next big football carnival the UEFA is already preparing for.
Set to take place in Germany, the new Euros logo is already out on social media. Along with a light show at the Olympiastadion in Berlin, unity and inclusivity were presented as the main theme of the logo redesign.
The symbol had been based on the European flag colours, in the shape of the host Olympiastadion in Berlin. The logo still features the traditional Euro Cup, along with the use of bold colours and a new oblong shape. Meanwhile, the ‘O’ in Euro, represents the Olympiastadion.
EURO2024 Logo
The unleashing video reads ‘Everyone is invited to bring their colours.’ UEFA also go on to say in the video “For all generations, all voices and all of us, united by football.”

The animated video has over 350k views on YouTube. The colours of the logo appeal to every nation in Europe instead of solely Germany’s black, red and yellow, thus representing “a ‘EUROS for ALL’.

The logo makes it clear as can be that the upcoming Euros is meant to be an occasion that connects people and communities through compassion, diversity and integration. A lesson to build on from the racist outlast following the previous Euro finals.

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A logo is the face of any brand. And who better knows the importance of a logo in branding, like Canva? The graphic design tech giant has come up with a new logo for their own brand recently.

New Logo of Canva

In today’s digital world, brand identity is the only unique language you can use to distinguish your position from others. Canva has recently brought up a change in their logo, which might have been missed by most people. This itself shows success in how much the brand has established its identity. The logo no longer remains in the icon format like before. Nevertheless, it is consistent in using the same radiant turquoise to a purple gradient that goes well with the existing brand language.

New Logo of Canva

Canva believes that design should be easily accessible and understandable no matter where the onlooker comes from. Their collective mission as a company has always been to empower the world to design. Design plays a key role in everyone’s lives and Canva has just helped us see it in a different light. Their brand has definitely evolved from their initial days, and their perspective has now changed to embrace flexibility. They claim that the reason for the change was to be easy enough to use across all mediums alike.



Canva has made it very clear that this is not a case of rebranding, but refining their existing brand image. Their product offers simplicity and accessibility to design, and that is exactly what their logo represents. This logo has first been iterated by Rob Clarke, a famous type designer and lettering artist. The company claims that this can be designed by their platform as well. This version of their logo that is hand-drawn as well as optimised for the screen shows how creativity is for all.

New Logo of Canva
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Illustrations are potent tools of communication. If used wisely, they are capable of creating wonders, especially in the world of branding. Illustrations can profoundly impact the viewer, thus imprinting the brand in a potential customer’s mind. This aspect has edged several marketing specialists to urge upcoming brands to associate themselves with an original illustration. Read further to understand the use of illustration in branding, as explained by the Italian illustrator Monica Alletto.

Illustrations by Monica Alletto
Space Travel, 2019



The first impression is essential for forming any sort of lasting bond. When it comes to a product, this first impression is established through branding. By definition, branding is a process through which a company ascertains its identity by creating a name, design, and symbol unique to it. This vital process is bought to fruition with cleverly composed, thoughtfully drafted designs, often accompanied by gorgeous illustrations.

Illustrations by Monica Alletto
Il Miglior Riparo, 2021

It is through the use of such wonderous illustrations that Monica Alletto, a renowned illustrator from Italy, designs illustrations for brands. Born in Palermo, Sicily, Monica graduated in didactics and Pedagogy of Art at the Academy of Fine Arts in Palermo. Her habitual practice of seeking challenges and continuous self-learning resulted in her signature style where vibrant colours and soft shapes are predominant. Monica boasts a brilliant career that is divided between exhibitions, magazines, agencies and publishing houses.

Illustrations by Monica Alletto
Gira_Sola, 2019

Her illustrations are a result of her keen observation, experimentation, passion and rigorous practice. “Illustration has always been an important part of my life. It helped me communicate with others while also helping me overcome my walls of insecurities that only became higher with age. Thus, there is no defined beginning for when I started to illustrate. It has always been with me and always will be.”

Illustrations by Monica Alletto
Cover Catalogues Margò_2020/2021_ “Bali, Africa, Caribbean and Maldives”

These illustrations are not just another work of art, but a tool of communication, narrating the brand’s story and its ideals. But its function does not end there; “the illustration must also increase the product’s potential, both in terms of appearance and sales to the customer. Shapes, colours and signs must be able to communicate with each other and in turn with the product, with the sole objective of making you understand what you are sponsoring,” explains Monica.

Illustrations by Monica Alletto
Cover Catalogues Margò_2020/2021_“ Maldives”

Hence, one can simply state that communication is a highly crucial aspect of a design. While being a visual treat, the illustration must also engage with the potential consumers and enforce the brand ideals. To communicate these effectively, Monica offers three critical factors to keep in mind during the designing process, and they are, “The theme, the sensation to be showcased and the audience Once these three factors are defined, the chances of success in the production phase will be higher. I want to add a fourth factor, which in my opinion, should never be missing. It is ‘the unexpected’. This factor leaves the possibility of inserting something at random, which might have seemed wrong initially, but can work up to your advantage if analysed and implemented correctly,” elucidated the artist.

Cover Catalogues Margò_2020/2021_ “Greece”

But these factors hardly scratch the surface. To successfully narrate and reflect the brand, the illustrator must first know the brand and product. “It is necessary to talk with those who work closely with the product, enquire its origin, the target audience and possible changes in its future. Understanding the history of the brand is also crucial. These will ensure that the illustration increases the product’s appeal, mirror the brand’s history and hint at innovation.”

BioSicilia soft drinks - Bibite Polara, 2019

Alletto’s signature style is a minimalistic illustration, sketched with simple shapes and a vibrant colour palette. These illustrations deliver a clear message in the simplest form. “These minimal artworks arise from the most complex thoughts. After a thorough analysis of the theme and rigorous brainstorming, a beautiful idea is born. Once all the superfluous things are taken away, the idea is clear and simple,” comments Alletto.

The idea is then implemented through cleverly composed art pieces consisting of basic shapes. “An illustration in its simplest form carries with it a very clear message, even as it leaves some room for personal interpretation. A message becomes apparent only when it is understandable to as many people as possible. Hence, the more universal the form, the higher the read.” The artist further explains their composition process, “A composition works if the elements find their balance and provide a coherent overall picture.

But finding the perfect balance between elements is not immediate. I draw series of drafts; this will take me to the final work. I start with the sketches of all the illustration’s crucial elements and work with them, like a puzzle, until I find the perfect balance for that illustration.”

Monica’s passion for art is profound and asks young artists to let their passion guide them. “When you create something, be it for yourself or a client, your love for what you do should motivate your work. Your passion for your work will help you excel in your field, help you stand out and remain fresh and current. Your art is your mirror; it reflects you. So, always be sincere, and you will learn to love your work.”

Published in Issue 52

The pandemic has brought many different challenges for everyone. But educating our young ones is among the top priority. The issue focused on how design education is still possible while most of us are locked in our homes. We also interacted with illustrators and photographers such as Jasjyot Singh Hans and Anirudh Agarwal, who seem to stand firm with their uniqueness in this time of chaos. Overall this issue serves food for thought with visually stunning creativity on a single platter.

 


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We go through many interesting projects each day and find them inspiring enough to be shared further. Projects which have the potential to inspire and spark multiple ideas. So, here are few selected one for this week’s design inspiration, enjoy!

Packaging Design by NH1 Design
Packaging Design by NH1 Design
Packaging Design by NH1 Design
Packaging Design by NH1 Design

Packaging for BIBA by NH1 Design

A-Trak ‘In The Loop’ by DIA Studio

A visual identity design exploration by ATOM63
A visual identity design exploration by ATOM63
A visual identity design exploration by ATOM63

A visual identity exploration by ATOM63



The TypoGrAphiC series by Dev Ethan Valladares

Type Collection by Tenski

Mejo 2021, Packaging Design & Illustration by Lucia del Zotto
Mejo 2021, Packaging Design & Illustration by Lucia del Zotto
Mejo 2021, Packaging Design & Illustration by Lucia del Zotto
Mejo 2021, Packaging Design & Illustration by Lucia del Zotto
Mejo 2021, Packaging & Illustration by Lucia del Zotto

Design for CSA by Interbrand



Illustration & Packaging for Le Ketch by Véronique Lafortune & Florence Boudier

Branding & Packaging for Marks Family Chocolate by Permanent® Agency

Product Positioning & Identity for Bira 91 Gold by CoDesign

If you have any of your projects or someone else’s, which is equally inspiring for fellow creatives, then share it with us on contribute@creativegaga.com

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Kurnal Rawat, Creative Director for Landor & Fitch, tells us how brands have changed in the past two decades and what it takes to build a brand today.

CG: How did you get into branding as a career?

KR: I knew early on that I was interested in design. I did my undergrad at J. J, School of Arts. It was during this time I explored quite a bit. It was the 90s, so computers and printing technology were fairly new. I loved experimenting with the print even when it was still very new in the market. I even started my studio called Grandmother India right after college.

CG: How did you decide to start your design studio so early on, without any experience?

KR: I was a rebel then, even in college. I started Grandmother India, where I experimented with all media and formats available then, including animation. I thoroughly enjoyed the process. I learned a lot and gained immense knowledge.

CG: You have been in the industry for over 20 years now. How have brands evolved over this period?

KR: Branding has changed quite a bit over these two decades. In the 90s, it was all about advertising and the marketing campaign. Soon brands realised that it is not enough. The brand identity now is more than just a logo. They later began to see the importance of packaging and the fronts where brands make an impression. Today it is about the experience that a brand gives both in-store and online.

An example of that is when I worked on the Colour Store by Asian Paints. We had to design every aspect of the customer experience, right from wayfinding signages, in-store collaterals to the way customers were spoken to.

Another shift that we are seeing is that brands are moving towards sustainability. People today, instead of being brand conscious, are more concerned about sustainability.

Kurnal Rawat - How have Brands Evolved through Time?


CG: So how have people and the customers of these brands changed over time?

KR: Customers have become very aware now, with so much information on brands available out there. They want to know everything about the brands – the back story, who is manufacturing it, is this a fair trade, what is it made of, is it sustainable, etc. And now brands have to adapt to these expectations of the customers. As I said, people now are more conscious of the brands they use.

Kurnal Rawat - How have Brands Evolved through Time?

CG: As a Creative Director, how do you manage the Creative Team? In terms of guiding them yet giving them free rein?

KR: We have a design strategy in place. We decide the purpose, positioning, and broad outcome of the brand personality first. It’s done by using tools like customer journey maps, etc. Once we have a clear understanding of the strategy we want to apply, and the direction we want to take the brand. The team then has free creative rein to work on it. The team can get creative within the broad strategy that has been decided.

CG: What challenges have you faced with clients?

KR: Today, people are aware of the importance of a brand identity. In my early days, I needed to sit with clients and educate them about it. It was challenging to make them see long-term value in brand building. But today, that is not really a problem. Everyone knows how important branding is.

Kurnal Rawat - How have Brands Evolved through Time?

CG: How can we bring Indian culture into brand identities?

KR: There is a shift in the Indianness of brands as well. Youngsters now go abroad to study, and there they find a need to have their own identity. So now they are diving back into their roots.

Kurnal Rawat - How have Brands Evolved through Time?

Slowly Indian culture is getting recognised on the global platform with pride. Young designers who work in other countries have realised that the unique value they bring to the table is their own cultural identity.

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Kurnal Rawat
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Kurnal Rawat is a creative director at Landor & Fitch whose work brings Indian contemporary design to the forefront. With over 20 years of industry experience, Kurnal began his career by co-founding Grandmother India – a pioneering move to start a branding and design agency when the Indian market was full of advertising houses.

 

From startups to Corporates, Kurnal has successfully worked across varied industries like Aviation, Banking, Consumer Goods, Exhibitions & Events, Fashion & Lifestyle, Hospitality, Sports, and Government initiatives. Some of the renowned names he has worked with are Hinduja Healthcare, British Council, Godrej, to name a few.


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With cover illustrations by Archan Nair, this issue brings inspiring Digital illustrations, Extreme Graffiti, expert’s insights on space design and many more!


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The Rajasthan School is an interesting creation by Sanjay Puri Architects playing full tribute to the site, the context, and the functions. Designed to suit the climate of Rajasthan, the school has a facade of red angled fins, along with a towering entrance. The school is also energy efficient with its layout planning, and sources of energy.

Rajasthan, the largest state in India, which contains the Thar Desert, is well known for its extreme climatic conditions. Amidst the dry breeze, one cannot miss out on the towering red beams that make the walkways of this school here.

Architects by Sanjay Puri
Architects by Sanjay Puri

Designed by Sanjay Puri Architects, the Rajasthan School, is set over three storeys. The criss-cross alignment of the pathways creates an interesting shadow play right at the entrance. There is a large central courtyard amidst these walkways that gets shelter from the pergolas aligning them. They are red, bold, and larger than life. As we traverse within them, towards the interior of the school, we notice the primary coloured interiors behind the deep red-walled facades.

Architects by Sanjay Puri
Architects by Sanjay Puri

The school’s east, west, and south walls are slanted to deflect the sun, sloping such that they are broader at the bottom than at the top. Sanjay Puri Architects, established in 1988, in Mumbai, Maharashtra always ensures to provide contextual solutions in the built environment. The school has also been fueled by leftover energy generated by a local cement industry, making it environmentally friendly and energy-efficient.

The energy efficiency is further articulated from the design of the red beams which provide shade, ventilation, and circulation ensuring breathability within the spaces. Every classroom has been designed to face north to make maximum use of the indirect sun. This is also a sustainable move ensuring maximum daylight utilisation. Angled fins protrude from either side of the recessed glazing sections. These act as a design element for the facade, while ensuring protection against harsh climatic conditions.



The complex’s southern side has primary school classrooms, a triple-height auditorium, and administrative offices. Secondary school classrooms, a library, and a cafeteria are located on the other side of the shaded courtyard area.

Architects by Sanjay Puri

The school’s layout was also said to be inspired by the urban style of an old Indian city, with narrow lanes covered by high walls, according to Sanjay Puri Architects. The inspiration from the organic old towns, with an informal layout, alternating open and enclosed volumes resulting in a climate-responsive design is a highly exploratory space.

Architects by Sanjay Puri

The classrooms are surrounded by semi-open courtyards, and the adjacent grounds include sports courts and a jogging track. Inside, the walls are painted in the same vivid red, with blue and yellow accents. Internal organic circular cut-outs or perforated facades interrupt these blocks of primary colours, offering fascinating visual linkages across corridors and staircases while also enabling air to pass through.