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Tanmay Mandal
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Tanmay Mandal is an artist who hails from the Indian subcontinent but who currently resides in Prague, Czech Republic working for Pixel Studio. He is an Indian educated Artist who has artistry in creating captivating concept art which transcends borders.

 

With a signature hyper-realistic artwork creator, he centres fictional characters from his diverse areas of interest. Tanmay Mandel is an artist who draws inspiration from all over the world. Be it Marvel, DC, Egyptian Gods and Goddess or his choice to feature both Greek and Hindu Mythology characters through his artwork.


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Meditation, Motivation and Manifestation are the 3Ms that Lovely Kukreja, relies on while illustrating. Taking us on step-by-step approach through his painting Goddess Durga, he explains the basic guidelines that play a pivotal role in the final outcome.

Meditation

Nowhere related to the spiritual practice, meditation, here is the thought process, creative thinking before starting any project.

Step 1

Great ideas start as random scribbles (thumbnails, rough drawings and armatures). This will help in deciding the posture angle and composition. While doing these initial sketches, it’s important to mull over the subject aka meditate to set the mood; the vital areas to focus on to bring in freshness.

Step 2

Once satisfied with the sketch of Goddess Durga, start blocking tones in the grey-scale mode with the basic air-brush. You don’t really have to go fancy by trying several textured brushes. Just do the basic block-in while keeping the area to be focused well-lit.

Step 3

Convert your painting to RGB mode and start adding colours on a layer overlaid on it. Choose colour palette as per the theme. For the Goddess Durga painting here, I chose the unsaturated soft shades. Close your eyes and try to see the picture you have in your thoughts.

Tip

Stay away from textured brushes as it may blur the edges of your drawing.

Motivation

Never search for style, but study. This is where research comes into the picture; the motivation gained from creative intuition, studies and reference materials. At this stage, it is important to collect facts about the subject of creation.



Step 4

Once the basic look and the feel of the painting is established, bringing the volume on each object can begin with the direction of light decided in the very beginning. At this stage, it is important to collect facts about the subject of creation.

Step 5

Detailing the elements e.g. water, foliage, trees and grass. Motivation is the key, to paint better with each stroke passing.

Step 6

Now it’s time to break the barriers and go beyond the sketch. After deciding the intricate details (cloth texture, ornaments, fur and hair), paint over the sketch on a new layer with free-hand for each subject.

Tip

If you are in process of learning to paint, try not to use any image.

Manifestation

It finally boils down to manifesting all the effort, knowledge and studies into strokes of brush applied. This is when you bring ideas to life. Those final touches, elaborating it with all those tiny details is vital to make it your personal piece of work.

Step 7

The working area is closed and fine details are added to each object after thorough research.



Step 8

Tonal values, sharpness and colour balance is adjusted.

Tip

Stay away from textured brushes as it may blur the edges of your drawing.

Step 9

Adding foreground elements gives a sense of depth to the scene. Elements like foliage, leaves and any life-full character create liveliness.

Tip

I suggest you to always keep the subject close to its originality. You are allowed to bring freshness while you keeping it intact within logical boundaries.

Published in Issue 40

We all have favourite TV shows and we passionately discuss the stories and characters of it. But sometimes, we tend to ignore the channel and its branding. Now with many different channels to choose from, we are experiencing many new branding overhauls to grab the audience’s attention. In this issue, we focused on Motion Graphics design and people behind some awesome channel rebrandings. If you are interested in moving design or animated content then this issue is a must-read for you! So go ahead and order your copy or subscribe if you want to keep receiving your regular dose of inspirations!

 

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If you’re talented, you will be noticed. The world is full of freelance opportunity these days, just that one must know which and when to take one. A successful designer is one that find his/her niche in the design world, believes young illustrator Ashish Subhash Boyne. Here, he tells us how showcasing everyday stories in a refreshing manner can open doors to a ‘not so every day’ life!

Freelance
Character Design

Freelance
AGHORA.

Freelance
AGHORA.

Find inspiration in everyday things that are omnipresent

People often pass by without taking notice of things that they encounter every single day. For executing story illustrations, these are the places you need to look. The skill is to give mundane life a refreshing and ‘never seen or heard before’ appeal. Like Surmai that showcases the story of a small boy who lives near fishing docks or 100 Kisses that shows how a cup of tea passes through so many people of different backgrounds. Just keep in mind, the purpose of the work is to be understood by everyday people. The execution needs to be simple. Don’t forget that fantasy is all around and finding a unique niche is the key to getting recognised.

Freelance
AGHORA.

Freelance
AGHORA.

Freelance
Character Design



Freelance
Character Design

Education prepares the talent within you

Most people are born with certain talents that define their future. Ask any designer to take a peek back into their childhood; they’d tell you they loved things like drawing, comics and imaginative forms. As you go grow up and finally get into school to do what you love doing, you start to understand yourself better. The vague question of ‘what do you want to do?’ starts to become clearer. Illustration art needs high observation of the subject matter that needs to be combined with your skill to visualise and express the idea in a simpler way. Studying design helps you do that. It also leaves you an initial portfolio that introduces you to the outside world.

Freelance
Illustration for BAJAJ ELECTRICAL'S "Magic of Light "

Freelance
Illustration for BAJAJ ELECTRICAL'S "Magic of Light "

Freelance
DEATH TO LIFE

Freelance
Tribe Spirit Hunter

The outside world is a self-learning experience

The transition from a student to a professional is a gradual process where change settles in with time and comes the wider understanding of client needs, concepts and ideas. Hard work, dedication and passion are the three key attributes that you need to bring to the class every day of your professional life.

Freelance
SURMAI.

Freelance
SURMAI.



Freelance
100 KISSES.

Freelance
100 KISSES.

A satisfied client is a gateway to the freelance career

When you’re just about to start off to try and make a mark for yourself in the big world of design, often most people wonder ‘How do I do this?”. It’s simple. Concentrate on things that come to you. Whether it’s your first assignment or project it’s important to make each and everything you do unique and fulfilling as per the client’s requirements. The rest is history.

Freelance
100 KISSES.

Freelance
FIXTRAL CAMPAIGN ILLUSTRATION

Published in Issue 22

Dedicated to the talented design graduates who are not just looking to work but seeking experience in order to realise the greater goal of life. The issue features various designers from India and abroad. Kevin Roodhorst from The Netherlands realised his goal so early in life that propelled him to start his career as a designer as young as 13. Ashish Subhash Boyne, a student of Sir JJ Institute of Applied Art realised his dream while studying when he started doing freelance projects, which allow him to express his free thoughts. To name a few talents we have Vivek Nag from Fine Arts from Rachna Sansad Mumbai, Simran Nanda from Pearl Academy New Delhi, Anisha Raj from MAEER MIT Institute of Design Pune, Giby Joseph from Animation and Art School Goa and much more. This issue gives a fresh perspective of talented graduates and their unique approach to design.

 


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For the majority of good design, less is, in fact, more. Rahul Bhogal and his team at Nothing Design Studio aim to declutter and simplify brand identities and strategies to make a memorable experience for their user bases.

Brand Identities by Rahul Bhogal
Making Waves Swim School, Facility Design

Brand Identities by Rahul Bhogal
Making Waves Swim School, Signages

Rahul Bhogal is a ‘meticulous maker of well-crafted brand identities’, and it definitely shows. He has clocked over ten years as a graphic designer and art director, specialising in brand identity and digital design. Rahul runs an independent design studio called ‘Nothing’, which at first glance, may seem an interesting title choice for a visual-heavy enterprise. Initially starting as a joke inspired by a Seinfeld episode (“The Pitch”), he found that the name resonated with his spiritual journey and desire to explore our world. As a bonus, he tells us it’s a great conversation starter at the very least.

Brand Identities by Rahul Bhogal
Spline Group

Brand Identities by Rahul Bhogal
Spline Group

Brand Identities by Rahul Bhogal
Spline Group, Outdoor signage

When asked about his design philosophy, Rahul quotes Sadhguru, “Forget philosophies, embrace reality.” He finds philosophies to be creatively crippling, closed off and restrictive, choosing instead to follow a practice to do what he loves while being passionately detached from the work he produces. Rahul expands the thought to keep curiosity alive and design for delight, empathy, coherence, and trust.

Brand Identities by Rahul Bhogal
Spline Group, Website



Brand Identities by Rahul Bhogal
Spline Group, Website.

Rahul’s experience in the industry has revealed that most brands struggle with establishing a solid connection with an audience due to being unclear about their user base. Catering to vague demographics and personas affects their ability to provide a memorable experience or produce creative methods of communication impacting their overall brand identity.

Canary Dental, Identity and signage.

Canary Dental, Identity and signage.

He tackles this by gaining clarity on the problem his clients are trying to solve and determining the metrics used to measure success. Working within these parameters allows him to reduce the solution (design or strategy) to its core for the most impact. Echoing Dieter Rams, Rahul believes that “simplicity is the key to excellence” and believes there is elegance and sophistication to the reductive design.

Art as Therapy, Brand Collateral

Art as Therapy, Brand Collateral

An excellent example of this mentality is the brand identity redesign for the Spline Group. Exploring the case study, you can see how Rahul directs the vision towards stripping away all the bells and whistles of the old identity, eventually leaving a customised wordmark and a striking colour palette that makes its presence felt. For a brand in the engineering space, this modern overhaul inspires a modern, professional, and dependable identity that cuts to the chase. The website design had an honourable mention on Awwwards, and AIGA featured the identity in its members’ gallery.

Brand Identities by Rahul Bhogal
Game6 Sports Academy,
Identity, court design, and team jersey.



“I’m interested in creating work that is inspired by culture and community” – a trait that we see with his self-initiated creative projects inspired by Sikh culture. On the one hand, the work features a gorgeous painting of Guru Nanak in a meditative state and a playful “Sikher than your average” t-shirt design on the other.

Brand Identities by Rahul Bhogal
Source of Nature, Branding and packaging.

We asked Rahul about his experience navigating the pandemic and if he had any new insights about the future of the design market. He found it challenging due to a lack of human interaction and collaborative environments. Still, as the world is headed towards digital experiences, he has taken the opportunity to understand human behaviour and emotions within these constraints.

Bramptonist, Swag with messaging

Published in Issue 52

The pandemic has brought many different challenges for everyone. But educating our young ones is among the top priority. The issue focused on how design education is still possible while most of us are locked in our homes. We also interacted with illustrators and photographers such as Jasjyot Singh Hans and Anirudh Agarwal, who seem to stand firm with their uniqueness in this time of chaos. Overall this issue serves food for thought with visually stunning creativity on a single platter.

 


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Sameep Padora & Associates creates an architecture (temple) that is part landscape and part building. This building absolutely marries the socio-cultural expectations with the ecological framework and dynamics of the site.

Balaji Temple in Nandyal
Balaji Temple in Nandyal

The Balaji Temple in Nandyal, Andhra Pradesh designed by Sameep Padora & Associate. This piece of architecture takes a modern take to the traditional Hindu temples with its contemporary design, nevertheless maintaining the conventional decorum.

Balaji Temple in Nandyal

The design of the buildings and water pond was inspired by a 10th-century temple that is located in Tirupathi, Southern India. As Padora explained, “The planning of our temple carries forward the historic precedent of temple plans which addresses the two shrines and the bathing pond for the deity at the entry.”They also added how all of the planning was done in dialogue with temple priests who had input on what was placed where according to tradition.

The Temple for the residents of the adjacent Nandyal village comprises two tower-topped shrines, where the larger one contains the Balaji shrine, while the smaller temple contains the Varahaswamy shrine, along with an elongated building that contains a kitchen for preparing offerings, public toilets and the priest’s quarters and is build around a moat.



The assimilation of this pool was said to be the most complex phase of the construction as the region chosen was majorly an arid land. Overcoming this challenge, Padora diverted wastewater from a nearby quarry into an area of low lying land and created a water retention basin that was planted with vegetation to naturally clean it.

Balaji Temple in Nandyal

“This single programmatic addition, begins the dialogue, between the temple form, the access steps and the water,” Padora continued.

Balaji Temple in Nandyal

On creating the temple with black limestone slabs that were locally accessible Sameep Padora & Associates said,” Modernity wasn’t really a preoccupation for the design of the temple. It was about how the temple was located in its physical context, the available resources and what real value we were able to create using the temple as a catalyst.” These slabs were also used to create the stepped forms of the temples, which are planted with greenery on the lower levels to buffer the interiors from the heat.

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Matharoo Associates believe in clear emphasis on functionality, use of materials in their natural form and exercising restraint while designing a house or building. Their buildings are designed to unfold and reveal their secrets and meaning.

Matharoo Associates House
Curtain Door House with Wall of Light

1. The House with Balls

The 600 Sq-Yard weekend home for an aquarium owner comprises four separate fish breeding tanks, an observatory that could double up as living space and a private sleeping area, all with provisions for biogas, rainwater collection for fishes and ETHE. On opening the house’s distinctive shutters, this linear space transforms completely into an infinite one, continuously mingling with and perpendicular to its original direction.

Matharoo Associates House
House with balls, Ahmedabad

Matharoo Associates House
House with balls, Ahmedabad

The house assumes a squat position and the curving wall to one side allows one to walk up the gentle slope on to the terrace running over the length of the house. Rainwater is harvested throughout the year to be used for the fish tanks and space made by this curving wall is used as a tank.

Matharoo Associates House
Prathama

Matharoo Associates House
Prathama



2. House with the Warped Court

The intention here was to use traditional design solutions, one of which is to centre the spaces around a courtyard that provides a reclusive family area. The other was to use ‘Haveli’ inspired closed outer shell and hollow insides.

 

Irregular site lines act to generate a skewed wood form the finished concrete box that encloses the house and provides a vision, climate, and noise buffer. These lines also help in making the best of the required margin space, engendering individuated clear and green spaces on all sides of the house enjoyed through the selective openings into these landscape gems.

Matharoo Associates House
Queen Mary’s High School

3. House with Wall of Light

The dwelling emulates the various facets of a diamond in several ways through the use of contrasting materials. The rough diamonds are represented by the concrete walls poured in stone casts and the polished ones are represented by the light emanating the onyx wall.

Matharoo Associates House
Matharoo Associates Studio

One is opaque, the other transparent. One envelops the house and the other ties the house together. One absorbs, the other radiates. One is neutral, the other colourful. One is rough and the other is smooth. The core family and private areas are placed in a “black box” characterized by the use of Kadapa stone representing carbon, another avatar.

Matharoo Associates House
Patel Residence

Matharoo Associates House
House of Warped Court

One is opaque, the other transparent. One envelops the house and the other ties the house together. One absorbs, the other radiates. One is neutral, the other colourful. One is rough and the other is smooth. The core family and private areas are placed in a “black box” characterized by the use of Kadapa stone representing carbon, another avatar of the diamond. The base flooring is economical and common but robust Kota stone represents continuity and is set against the chic neutrality of travertine representing contemporary living.



Matharoo Associates House
India Pavilion

The three identical staircases are aligned to the three site angles converging near the entrance; one is placed on the floor, the second on the wall and the third on the ceiling; signifying the illusionary world of diamonds.

Matharoo Associates House
Sand Stone and Water, house in Jodhpur

Published in Issue 01

With cover illustrations by Archan Nair, this issue brings inspiring Digital illustrations, Extreme Graffiti, expert’s insights on space design and many more!

 


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For innovation and originality one needs to break-free from the herd mentality. With design and aesthetics as its core, FutureDeluxe, headed by Andrew Jones & James Callahan, is a design and motion studio that is in constant pursuit of aesthetic innovation with every project it undertakes. Here, they give us an insight into some of the crucial aspects that makes them tick in the industry.

CG. With a wide array of projects from varied industries, what is your creative process like?

FD. Today’s commercial timelines are tight and short, therefore, exploration of new styles and production outside of projects is paramount; to gain knowledge beforehand to bring in a unique approach towards the project. Our creative process is different with every project that we work on, we strive to experiment and innovate every single time.

CG. How do you keep your team updated with the newest technology/ techniques and how does the research enable innovation in your work for diverse clients?

FD. With a broad spectrum of in-house designers and a bigger community of trusted partners and freelancers, the FutureDeluxe family in itself is the key to our diversity. Our interests within the company remain broad and we are always on the lookout for talented artists to collaborate with. It’s that collaboration and mix of styles and techniques which keep it interesting for all of us.

CG. What are the challenges faced when creating a moving, live-action narrative?

FD. The approach is very different. When working with CG and digital technology, gives us an opportunity to approach the project in unconventional ways. It allows us to explore and change direction regularly within the project timeline. We are essentially designing and experimenting all the way through the process which means we often stumble on looks and techniques which are happy accidents. However, working with the latest equipment and technology for experimentation or innovation also means a huge financial outlay on a regular basis!



With live action and more narrative based projects, the planning and scripts are written in advance and the production process follows a strict timeline and storyboard, especially with live shoots. You can’t experiment on set as much as you do in a studio!

CG. How important are aesthetics in story-telling?

FD. We are a design-led studio and aesthetics plays a major role in visual story-telling. However, we are aware of the wide variety of aesthetics prevalent in the industry which seems disposable in today’s age with the limited time span. Therefore, we strive hard to create something challenging, which has never been done or seen before, to make it more memorable.

CG. Apart from motion graphics, which are the other domains that your studio would want to explore?

FD. Emerging technology, films, and digital backgrounds are the key aspects of how we work and the style of work we want to make. Unintentionally, over the last two years, a majority of our commercial work has been CG based. This year we have been working on more data-driven work for a TV Chanel and a digital product brand. We are currently working on large-scale installations for two automotive brands as well.

CG. Experimental design is all about pushing the boundaries of technology. Can you cite one example from your body of work?

FD. We always try to do something new with every project undertaken. We used a great technique in our latest project, OFFF Titles where live-action macro footage was used to drive a particle FX system. This gave us incredible results.

Our procedural approach to all of our design work is the same where we create these techniques which are computational with varied results, while a more traditional and linear approach will give you only one outcome. These unexpected and varied outcomes are interesting and what excites us the most.



CG. Apart from stunning imagery, your designs visually connect with the audience and are successful in exciting the mass. What are the key points for consideration to achieve this?

FD. I think when you achieve to create something that’s new and original in today’s saturated content channels, it will always connect. Creating a reaction, good or bad is better than no reaction at all. We put our heart and soul into our projects and hope that it connects and resonates with people.

Published in Issue 40

We all have favourite TV shows and we passionately discuss the stories and characters of it. But sometimes, we tend to ignore the channel and its branding. Now with many different channels to choose from, we are experiencing many new branding overhauls to grab the audience’s attention. In this issue, we focused on Motion Graphics design and people behind some awesome channel rebrandings.


If you are interested in moving design or animated content then this issue is a must-read for you!



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