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There are stories hidden in faces and bodies. Exaggeration brings them to the fore. A good caricaturist lives the subject and discovers the multiple facets that make the story. Caricature artist Manoj Sinha reflects while talking about his design process.

Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
PM Narendra Modi, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Captain Amarinder Singh, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Donald Trump, courtesy Hindustan Times Group

To watch is to Learn

Keep your eyes wide open. Watch every character and everything about them. Absorb yourself into your characters and feel their presence around them. Understand their behaviour, attitudes, experiences, and temperament. There is a story made by all these elements. Observe their actions, as they often determine the story. And then exaggerate all these through your strokes to re-tell the story.

Ajay Devgan, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Daroga ji, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Om Puri, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
caricaturist
Mr. Nitish Kumar, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha


Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Aamir Khan, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Raj Babbar, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
caricaturist
Mr. Rahul Bajaj, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha

Mind Precedes the Pen

Forget paper and pencil for some time. Take mental notes of their personality, work, and gestures, creating images in your mind, that’ll eventually come out in the form of caricatures. A caricaturist not just observes, but dissects. Study not just the character of every person, but the characteristic features as well. Generally, subjects have distinctive features that instantly catch the eye of an artist. In such cases, it becomes easy to exaggerate them and create the caricature. In other cases, the artist needs to dig deep into the subject and find out which feature or aspect to play with.

Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Virat Kohli, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Harmanpreet Kaur, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Kapil Dev, courtesy Hindustan Times Group

A caricaturist not just observes, but dissects. Study not just the character of every person, but the characteristic features as well. Dig deep into the subject to find out features to play with.


Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
RONALDINHO, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Danny Boyle, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
caricaturist
Naseerudin Shah, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha

Fun is Inbuilt

One needs to know the nuances of the subject to add to the appeal of the artwork. Read and analyse everything about your character. It will automatically develop a personal opinion about the person. As a caricature artist, the opinion is often laden with humour. Put the character in focus and the fun in the story will come out automatically. The more colourful a personality, the more fun you have doing the caricature.

Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
A P J Abdul Kalam, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Pranb Mukharjee, courtesy Hindustan Times Group


Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Jayalalithaa, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Yashpal, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha

The Caricature is not Fiction

Almost every time, a caricature is about a real personality and the story attached. It is the duty of a caricaturist to portray the true character of the subject chosen. Therefore it is important to understand the thin line that separates humour from sarcasm. The key lies in creating insightful humour and most importantly, being true to the character. That is why one needs to spot the “LOL” factor in everything around. You never know, what strikes off the next story.

Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
George W. Bush, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Bal Thakrey, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha
Ranveer Singh, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha


Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Dalai Lama, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Barack Obama, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Mr. Ratan Tata, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha

A Story is Timeless

A good caricature starts a relationship, between the story and the viewer. Media, today, is moving at an astonishing rate. Therefore it is important to choose topics that are not going to be forgotten at the next ‘Breaking News’ segment. The importance of a story lies in the fact that it brings education along with fun. This way, the news may become redundant but the awareness of the change that the news brings to the daily lives of the people lingers on

Steve jobs, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Mark Zuckerberg, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Sunder Pichai, courtesy Hindustan Times Group

Published in Issue 12

first interactive issue of Creative Gaga with Augmented Reality features. This issue focuses on the transition of Advertising from real to virtual and blurring the boundaries of both at the same time. Also bundled with lots of interesting articles and interviews.

 

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Packaging has gradually evolved from cardboard boxes or covers to keepsakes. As people realise the creative hard work behind beautiful packs, this hidden space is burgeoning to become a field full of innovation and potential. Isabela Rodrigues, a designer from Brazil, takes us inside the box with her out of the box philosophy.

packaging design by Swt.Co
Branding & Packaging for Sunset Gin

packaging design by Swt.Co
packaging design by Swt.Co
Branding & Packaging for Sunset Gin

Branding & Packaging for Sunset Gin

CG: Gone are the days where a label was slapped on plain and ordinary packaging. Your packaging designs make the product look exciting and inviting. What do you try and achieve through your designs?

Isabela. The goal of packaging design is to turn projects into collectable and saleable items. These ideas translate everything we do and our way to achieve the final result. The objective is to prevent the user from throwing away the packaging and decorate his/ her house with it instead.

packaging design
KRÄFTIG. Packaging
resembling real
exquisite fruit
shapes is employed
to showcase this
premium Brazilian juice brand.

packaging design
packaging design
JJ ROYAL PITCH. A clean, clear and modern
container design for Indonesia’s purest coffee
grains reinforces the enriching experience

packaging design

CG: What is it that excites you most about packaging design? What are the challenges that you face? Do you decide the fate of packaging design, or is someone else in control?

Isabela. The most exciting aspect of packaging is tactile designing and how it follows a simple function of conserving the product, selling it as well as enchanting the audience. The biggest challenges are the suppliers and the limitations to achieving the result we look for. Frequently, clients that are in the product-testing phase need packaging on a small scale. In that case, one has to migrate to simpler solutions that are available in the label/bottle segment. In this way, working to conciliate innovative and beautiful designs within those limitations enhances a designer’s abilities and experience.

packaging design
packaging design
These fun collectable packaging was developed especially for children using a tetra pack design in a sustainable manner that can be reused & recycled



packaging design by Swt.Co
Packaging for Liz

CG: Your designs are clean, minimal and follow a discipline, quite contrary to the Brazilian spirit which is known to be loud and colourful! How has Brazil influenced your designs?

Isabela. Brazil is renowned for its colours and aesthetics no doubt. However, the objective here is to try to be a studio with a personal and also global aesthetic. The goal is to fit into each customer’s reality and identity.

packaging design
This natural fruit juice line that contains vital vitamins uses an interesting health
based concept to break through traditional juice
packaging designs

packaging design
GOT MILK? Unique colour
combinations are
used to make milk a
fashionable drink

packaging design by Swt.Co
Branding for Marc Malou

packaging design by Swt.Co
Branding for Marc Malou

CG: Packaging design is still an unexplored territory. According to you, what are some of the traits of good packaging? What do you do differently to make your designs stand out?

Isabela. There certainly is a long way yet to go before packaging design becomes a celebrated design field. There is so much more potential for innovation and creation in this field. A good package must conserve the product, have a structure, sell and enchanting too. It’s vital to understand that one can’t do without the others; there’s no use in a beautiful but fragile package or even a rigid one that doesn’t show the concept of the product.

packaging design
This packaging
design for a French
brewery showcases
how designers can exercise complete freedom by breaking
paradigms simply
to delight the eyes

packaging design
Minimalism with a touch of the classic vintage glass bottle makes for an ideal way to showcase chocolate milk

packaging design
The design
exemplifies the
essence of Colombian
chocolate making by
using traditional
Cacao tree visuals to
take user through
that very journey

CG: And now something we’ve been dying to ask- why bottles?

Isabela. Why not bottles? Nowadays, many people are creating new products by quitting their conventional jobs, and the beverage industry is the one experiencing this the most. Alcoholic or not, this form of packaging is in constant demand.

packaging design
This branding and packaging design refreshes the identity of
a popular local restaurant known for its natural and healthy appeal.

packaging design
FROO.IT. The design presents the fruit drink in
a fun manner by using ludic and fashion illustrations

packaging design
This fashionable and luxurious bottle design captures the essence of spiced beverages by Manjoor Estate in conjunction with New York Fashion Week

Published in Issue 26

Packaging is the first vital step towards enchanting the audience. Who doesn’t like a cute box or a trendy bottle? With this issue, Creative Gaga lets the cat out of the box to reveal the world of packaging design. Featuring various local and international designers like Petar Pavlov from Macedonia and Brandziac from Russia, Elephant Design and Impprintz from Pune, the issue promises to be a keepsake for many.

 


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When unexpected ideas take shape, businesses are born. Such is the case of multi-disciplinary Creative Studio Inchwork, co-founded by Anant Ahuja based out of New Delhi. Transforming from a team of 2 to 8, the journey has been a roller coaster ride for the past two years and now it can only get better!

Studio
Child Essentials.

Co-founding his own company at the young age of 23, Anant Ahuja did not have it easy! Having his own practice was a way of proving himself and he did so with Gulab Saggu and Bharath Varma. Learning at work for the first few months after starting out paralleled with designing for big brands. They’ve seen hard times but they made it through the storm and haven’t since looked back!

Studio
Maneuvering Chicanes.

CG: How do you choose the style for any specific brands? And how minimal style of branding can make or break the marketing strategy?

Inchwork. Well, we specialise not just in design but also in brand strategy. We at Inchwork believe in giving brands a very holistic approach. While creating a brand, we start off with a brand-print/manifesto that forms the building blocks of most businesses. Post our market research for the brand, we come up with visual alternatives and solutions for it, while at it we do put out guidelines for the brand that will help build its marketing strategy, factoring in trend forecasts. Our sole vision is to make a brand powerful, through visual imagery, not just beautify it.

Studio
Maneuvering Chicanes.

CG: Where branding or re-branding is trending in the business world and everywhere else too. How you justify the uniqueness of your services?

Inchwork. I guess that would be our individual approaches within a team, we like bouncing ideas, doing drawing jams together and not pretend that we know everything. We’re not that a big team and all of us are multi-faceted, we like to experiment and challenge our own ways of working. We are basically open to adaptation. We always look at the bigger picture and the learning curve with it.

Fun With Type!

CG: How do the market research, product identity and reputation are aligned with the branding over the client’s need? Does that change the way you design for a brand?

Inchwork. Your biggest job as a design entity is to learn about your client’s business first and then apply your due diligence by educating them about what could work for them, and by that, I don’t mean blatantly putting them down, but advising them while being a sounding board at the same time. It’s very important for us to be fit for the job that we’re being assigned. And if the clients think that we can, then we better be doing that right.

 

So just to sum it up, it’s very important to understand the client’s perspective but at the same time be proactive enough to make them understand your take on the whole approach. You’re the professional here and it’s your job to get your market research, product identity and reputation in sync with the client’s needs.

Fun With Type!

CG: Does the choice of typography and colours influence the impact of the brand? How do you steer clear of commonly made errors of mismatch?

Inchwork. Definitely does, typography and the colours are the most crucial component of the visual part of branding. The whole brand perception from the first look defines your market approach. That’s why research is essential for any design project. When back at school, research was just a pain to get a decent grade, now it’s the pain you have to go through to get your brand right. As they say, “no pain, no gain.”

Fun With Type!



CG: What leads to the final outcome of any branding exercise, business needs or what the client wants?

Inchwork. We try and steer away from taking up what could end up being a difficult client, well that being said, a client is always difficult, you just have to ease them out with your approach to strategise their brand. We deal with marketing realities every day and as I said we make the adaptation easier. We’re here to educate and learn.

A mammoth task.

CG: What are the challenges of re-branding projects and how do you handle them?

Inchwork. Re-branding projects are the most difficult ones to tackle. A brand over a period becomes an entity with a notion, and its perception is hard to let go of. And at the same time, it’s very important to understand that it’s not a baby, it’s a grown-up adult, which is ready for a fresh lease of life. How you groom a baby and an adult is completely different and that’s where most people miserably fail. We’ve just recently finished branding and infrastructure giant and their properties and it has taken us almost over a year. I think patience is the biggest virtue and just be focused on what you love doing. For us that’s branding.

Published in Issue 34

This is a rebranding special issue focused on finding the answers to some of the basic questions like what is the right time for re-branding? or what all needs changing and how exactly? We interviewed some of the best branding studios like Landor Mumbai, Elephant, VGC, Inchwork, and many more. If you are considering rebranding or want to learn more about the art of doing it then this issue is a must read. So, go ahead

 


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Due to jewellery’s uniqueness and exclusiveness, it has been one of the most significant luxury assets throughout history. Landor & FITCH and Renaissance Global have collaborated to celebrate the relationship between women and jewellery, making the possession of fine jewellery special for modern women. Take a glance at their journey of creating a branding for Irasva’s exceptionally suave ambience.

Branding of Irasva
Branding of Irasva

About the Client

Renaissance Global has been operating in the jewellery industry for more than two decades and has designed incredible jewellery for marquee clients all over the world. They are venturing all over the globe and are the key suppliers of the majority of jewellery retailers including Irasva. The founder of Irasva Leshna Shah is truly devoted to designing and creates jewellery to perfection. Her collections have fine jewellery pieces designed and crafted by expert artisans.

Branding of Irasva


Branding of Irasva

Working on the Logo

Landor & FITCH have questioned everything in an ordinary jewellery store and reimagined its entire landscape. The brand name chosen to represent this idea was ‘Irasva’ which was the union of two words ‘enjoyment’ and ‘self’ in Hindi. The logo consists of the ‘S’ as an infinity sign which signifies the endless opportunities and ambitions of modern-day women aiming to create a branding that is sharper, culturally exciting, minimalistic and has a global design aesthetic.

Branding of Irasva

Eloquence of Uniqueness

The colour theme used by the brand is quite wicked. Pink and blue are fairly unambiguous colours that sit on the opposite side of the strong and delicate spectrum. These hues are commonly associated with women and men respectively. Irasva conscientiously uses these colours to break gender stereotypes. The intricate work on the details; from the wrapping paper to the small diamonds on the logo has all contributed to creating the comprehensive visual identity system of the brand. Landor has aimed to create visuals that would maintain Irasva’s essence but still make it look recherche. The pictures successfully convey this with jewellery floating, rising and shining portraying the brand as free-spirited.



Branding of Irasva

Seeing the Immortal Muse

In the process of designing Irasva for retail glory, Landor kept in mind to offer a warm welcoming and comfortable environment for the customer where they can walk, analysing and explore the jewellery and find the one which connects with them the most with ease. The store consists of gifting sections, a boudoir, café, dressing area and a designer’s favourite section. Everything from the displays to the usual jewellery store map was reimagined focusing on more than just the customer making a purchase.

Branding of Irasva
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Fashion can be presented in various ways but understood by an individuals the way they wish to see it. Richa Maheshwari has explored the digital lens to create still imagery, conveying an artist’s thoughts to the public through photography.

Photography

Avocation to Vocation

Not really sure of which field to specialize in her final year at design school, Richa had luck by her side to be guided by a professor in choosing photography as her major. It did not stop there. She very easily transformed her passion for photography into her flourishing profession.

Photography

She started freelancing while pursuing college. Having no godfather in the industry or having assisted no photographer, she learned everything by hit and trial, watching tutorials and self-practising. Taking on various projects boosted her confidence and helped her establish her own style and techniques.

On the Job

Richa uses photography to translate her vision into reality. She feels communicating the idea of a fashion designer to a commoner in a comprehensible style while retaining its essence is the job of a fashion photographer.

Photography

She defines fashion and lifestyle as her main subjects for photography and provides the entire shoot production from conceptualization of an idea to final print or digital realization. Her client list spans from ad agencies and fashion houses to individual artists and designers.

Photography

An Artist’s Ideology

I want to give something back to society, Richa used her skill-set to make documentaries and done photography on various social issues, many of which have been used as fund-raisers by different organizations. According to Richa, an artist is fully satisfied when he utilizes his creative best with full liberties. But sometimes, commissioned and client works come with a restriction on the imagination. She overcomes these restrictions on creativity while working on personal and social projects.

Photography

Stumbling Blocks

Photography is a very strong medium of communication that comes with its own set of limitations. The content portrayed to the masses should be crisp, clear and innovative, devoid of complexities and philosophical connotations. Producing work in a multi-cultural country like ours, one needs to respect the sentiments and emotions related to various beliefs and ideologies that are followed.

Photography


Motion-graphics today constitutes the peak of communication systems. But Richa is of the opinion that the still medium of photography is of much more explanatory worth than a motion-graphic.

Photography

Garnering professional experience while studying absorbed the survival pressure for Richa, which would have otherwise existed. Hence, she had the cushion to work upon all the technical and professional mistakes and keep growing in her field to become the success she is today.

Photography
Photography

Words of Advice

For the budding professionals of the field, she has some quick tips to keep in mind:

 

1. Be original with your ideas or even if you are drawing inspiration, do not replicate.


2. Develop your style and stick to it.


3. Don’t blindly follow rules. Be creative and as experimental as possible.


4. Be open to learning and keep researching about the latest happening in the industry and technology.


5. Never be satisfied or you will stagnate your growth.


6. Take calculative risks.


7. Give something back to society.

Photography

Published in Issue 45

When celebrations are all around for the new year, everyone is curious about what this new year will bring. So, the rounds of looking back to the past year and trying to predict the new one starts. We started the same exploration through this issue by reaching various experts for their take on the trends for their respective fields. So, go ahead.

 


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We go through many interesting design projects each day and find them inspiring enough to be shared further. Projects which have the potential to inspire and spark multiple ideas. So, here are few selected one for this week’s illustration inspiration, enjoy!

Illustration by Shashank Mishra
Illustration by Shashank Mishra
Shringara Rasaa

Illustration by Shashank Mishra
Draupadi Cheer Haran

Illustrations by Shashank Misha

Little White lies

Little White lies

City life for mindful mag

Illustrations by Whooli Chen

Illustration by Sukanto Debnath
Characters for Disney

Illustration by Sukanto Debnath
Jump

Illustrations by Sukanto Debnath

Illustration by Mridul Sen
Portrait of Sonam Kapoor

Illustration by Mridul Sen
Alia Bhat

Illustrations by Mridul Sen

THIEN AC VA CO TICH ARTBOOK

THIEN AC VA CO TICH ARTBOOK

Illustration for The First Jouney Book

Illustration for The First Jouney Book



Illustration by Ayan D.C.
JANA - 2 0 1 9

Illustration by Ayan D.C.

Portraits by Ayan D.C.

Illustration by Dhruv Chakkamadam
Lets just chill here a bit

Illustration by Dhruv Chakkamadam
Girl from the valley

Illustration by Dhruv Chakkamadam
Kinnauri Girl

Illustrations by Dhruv Chakkamadam

If you have any of your design project or someone else’s, which is equaliy inspiring for fellow creatives, then share it with us on contribute@creativegaga.com