1

ad here

What do you do when you receive an Amazon package? Like many of you, I pick up the cutter and cut it into pieces to quickly see what’s inside. After all, the box is just a waste, right? Well, that’s not the case with the Japanese artist Monami Ohno, a cardboards enthusiast who is more interested in the box rather than what’s inside it.

Cardboards Craft by Monami Ohno

A formal 3D artist who now is a famous cardboards sculpturist, Ohno has created masterpieces over these years that cover almost everything she could imagine. From food items to a giant monster, Ohno has left nothing untouched when it comes to cardboard art. Her cardboard craft reflects utmost detailing in everything she does brings out a realistic outlook in the cardboard art pieces she creates. With a mélange of fascinating textures, patterns design, her art seems very compelling to the viewers.

Ohno loves to develop from waste material only she needs a pair of scissors, a standard cutter, a marker, and glue to craft such impeccable pieces as cardboard box crafts. She finds versatile possibilities of expressing thoughts through cardboard art being an art form which, besides the ambiguity of the term, denotes artworks made from different types of this material. The aesthetics, style, and format of the art do not include in the definition. Ohno believes that discarded and old cardboard like the one found on the streets is best suitable for her visualization of cultural art. Also, the condition of material, being either found, reused or new is emptied of contextual meaning and serves for pure aesthetic explorations. Check her craft here.

It all started when Ohno realized that making craft items from rare and fancy materials can be very costly. She decided to do something from her old Amazon boxes that piled up in her store. She did tons of experiments with them and to her surprise cardboard turned out to be a good resource to explore and fly her imaginations. Cardboardis a suitable, lightweight replacement for a lot of other materials like clay or mud.

Cutouts glued into work to create elevated surfaces that segment a composition, adding depth and shadows to the cardboard box craft sculptures. Cardboard can not only make great, beautiful bodies and structures but can also be used for interior designs and detailing. These days Ohno spends more time perfecting her art and nailing her cardboard box crafts.

CURRENT ISSUE

 

ad here

The founder of ICD, Itu Chaudhuri, lets out his experience and insight in the field of branding. He expresses what goes into creating effective brands, and the various aspects or elements that play a role in the process.

Brand Identity for Taggd

CG. What is the relationship between the product and the branding? How does the former shape or inspire the latter?

ICD. For some brands, the product’s properties are the heart of the brand. For example, we know Mercedes by their cars, which are a model of stability and Germanic engineered perfection; not by their advertising or showrooms or their F1 Cars (which they do very well). For those brands, branding needs to reflect what’s special about the product, but rarely reflects the product itself. The ‘what’s special’ part, in turn, depends on the category. For more functional products, it’s about a clear benefit from using it (e.g. relieving pain).

Brand identity for thebo

For less functional brands, the benefit may be more in the mind i.e. how it makes people feel, or its ‘values’ (what it encourages its customers to believe in). This is also true for brands, which we know by their advertising more than by the special qualities of the product (e.g. a mobile service like Vodafone or Airtel). But, rarely does the branding show the product itself. If the product is a packaged product that’s never unpacked (think deodorants, or insect repellents, or a fizzy drink), then the branding and the product are practically fused (even when large advertising budgets support the brands).

Branding
Branding
Branding
Eicher Live.

CG. According to you, How and to what extent, does branding impact an audience?

ICD. Every customer knows that they are being manipulated. So, branding works best when it slips under the radar of the customers or escapes their ‘crap detector’. Yet, if the brand seems to admit this while managing to charm the customers, it works. The audience is then willingly helpless to resist. This means that the branding is, in some sense, invisible when it appears to belong or be inevitable as if there was no other way it could have appeared. This requires honesty on the owner’s part and linking the brand to what is true. Despite this, it’s carefully orchestrated. Simply appearing artless won’t do it. Done right, it can succeed in disarming the customer.

Branding
The Almirah.

Branding
The Almirah.

CG. What do you do to ensure that the brand character comes across fully in the final design?

ICD. Personality is the key, and thus cannot be overlooked or sidelined at any stage. It’s a mental model of the brand that describes the brand’s character and attitude, more like a representative, and thus implies its appearance.

Branding
The Wild Stone Code Range.
Brand applications for ‘Hired’.

CG. What do you feel should be proportion, or how much is the need for balance, between minimalism and complexities in a design?

ICD. The point isn’t a balance: it’s more a purposeful imbalance. Different brands need different treatments, so that one may do best in a minimal style, and another with a busy, or even chaotic style. This is a necessary facet that one needs to recognise and remember throughout the process.

Annual Report Design for IDFC.
Branding

CG. What do you feel is an essential part of branding?

ICD. Deep understanding of the client’s truth is fundamental and most essential, but making sure that it’s attractive to their customers is of value, at the same time. If you succeed on the first count and fail on the second, you touch no one. The other way around and the attraction will be skin deep. It very clearly is a case of both or nothing.

Branding
Publication design for Breakthrough.
Branding
The Real Tea Range.

Published in Issue 38

This issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE

 

Harshvardhan Kadam
ad here

Harshvardhan Kadam faces multi-fold burnout; it can be creative, physical, mental and also sometimes emotional. He maintains, that burnout means you need an urgent break!

But a break from exactly what? Are you tired of working back to back? Or just low on enthusiasm? Or have nothing left to express? Or just a self-projected burnout? All these reasons are okay long as you know how to deal with it. Harshvardhan shares his ways to tackle the burnout.

I was really young when my father told me that whenever you get bored of academic assignments, which were very narrow for exploration and didn’t cater to your complete potential, then just switch to some other medium of expression.

This made me look at films, photography, adventure sports, biking and even cooking. And that simple advice makes me explore everything I find exciting. Which does not just enhance my personal work but also the kind of creative individuals I got connected with, the friendships and collaborations I’ve done so far, which are worth cherishing for rest of my life.


Nowadays, the Internet is as constructive as destructive it is,

One’s focus plays a vital role in increasing their powers of expression. But you lose your focus and you feel the burnout; it literally means to empty your learning and restarting afresh.

To keep up with the new interactive world, self-assessment of individual potential, self-critiquing and analysing old work, are some of the important steps in any artistic processes. These can be done alone or even with your trusted companion who can tell you that what you’ve made is a shit when it is, and you do not feel taken aback. As accepting your weakness is also a part of climbing the ladder of growth.


Burnout has taught me, to be honest, to be grounded and appreciate all the beautiful things in life.

For me, this phase is as good as the one in which I create. The universe of possibilities otherwise will remain less explored. I do not bind myself to a term of an artist known for just one thing. For me, achievement has never been an ambition. That has made me accept moments as they come.


So, whenever I’m done with murals I get back to my cave and illustrate digitally or sketch on paper and that’s how I keep my energy levels high.

I have a Jaw Harp that I play, to switch with some old and new tools like iPad, sketchbook, a few empty walls, canvases, a couple of apps and gadgets I have invested in and that is how the life goes on

Published in Issue 33

We all face it! But everyone has their own unique way to come out of it, in this issue we try to explore different ideas of handling the ‘Creative Burnout’. The most common of all was #travelling, through everyone do it in their own unique style. Like Luke Ritchie from South Africa finds the nature and mountains as the best source of inspiration while Sushant Ajnikar says riding his bike and meeting four-legged loyal friends, dogs, on the way is the best way to learn. So, pack your bags and don’t forget to subscribe your copy before you leave!

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE

 

Saurabh Chandekar
ad here

Illustrator Saurabh Chandekar explains how kept himself open to every brief throughout his journey of being an artist/ illustrator and how his style has evolved with him.

I grow into my illustration style with time and experience. It’s a beautiful journey to try new things, always being open to new experiences and keep evolving. I never made any conscious effort at establishing my own style as an illustrator, but I always keep myself open to new briefs, a new point of views which help me explore the things differently.

Illustartion by Illustrator Saurabh Chandekar
Sati

For me this everlasting journey is more important than establishing my own style. But yes, a dominant hallmark of my character might stamp itself upon my work and that becomes my ‘style’. But with me, not confining myself to any set style is my style.

Illustartion by Illustrator Saurabh Chandekar
BLURRD

So for me, it’s a life process, I live, I experience, I observe and I express. My inspirations come from day to day lives, with time I think, I have succeeded in placing my own process to grasp them. Contrary to popular belief, inspiration does not necessarily have to come from only the extraordinary. My inspiration comes from ‘the ordinary’. From the many things that come to us by default. In the course of my interplay with society, as a professional and as a private citizen; normal events, ‘day-to-day’ happenings tend to take on a different and unexpected form. Forms that you never would or could imagine. My art, my inspiration is not alien to my society. In fact, it stems from it. My art is the manifestation of my life experiences.

Illustartion by Illustrator Saurabh Chandekar

I am thankful to my dad Late Mr Sadanand Chandekar who was a very well known one-man stand-up comedian; he gave me that eye of detailing. He used to narrate diverse human characters, his storytelling used to always fascinate me about how beautifully one can convey unique characteristics of the personalities. I think that fascination has always been my inspiration; to pick that beauty and to narrate it through my art forms i.e. drawing.

Old Statue

Music always inspires me a lot. For me, good music is the most important part of my work ambience. I hear music in any language, instrumentals, abstract music, I play, I sing all these are styles of expressions. I read up on all kinds of subjects which help me do my research.

TIRONA

The creation in itself is blissful. The professions where creative activities go on to enrich your life quality, it becomes a pleasure journey than mere money earning, as I have to state that when you know that the money is not everything the creative profession brings, you heaven to live with.

WRINKLE

Published in Issue 48

A Freelancer’s Life in India! Every day, with a dream of ‘Being Your Boss,’ many creative professionals jump into the pool of freelancing. But many are not well prepared for the life of the freelancer, which brings many challenges along with benefits. So to explore further, we interviewed many freelance illustrators and designers to get answers to the question you should ask before taking the final call of becoming your boss! So, if you are planning to or have already become a freelancer then this issue is a must-read for you.

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE

 

ad here

People are not too fond of throwing things away, and in the recycle-reuse world of today, people find ways to use small little things for their own unique purposes. Whether it’s a tin tea leaves box converted into a pen stand or gift basket used as home decor, designer Anoop Chalil believes it’s all about thinking one step ahead. Below, he outlines key points to help create innovative packaging that helps the product and its consumers.

Packaging for I am Pure
Packaging for I am Pure
Packaging for I am Pure

Experience comes with an Experience

It can be said that packaging design is more about the journey than the final creation from a designer’s point of view. It’s not just interacting with a product, but also with the people and culture behind it. These when combined enhance one as a packaging designer, giving you more insights and in depth knowledge of the skill.

Stationery for Club W
Stationery for Club W
Packaging for Club W

It’s not about doing different things, it’s about doing things differently

Every designer explores their own niche; their own style. And even though at first look, some designs by various designers might look similar, where it may look like identical tools or techniques have been used, a closer look reveals the small differences that make a difference. For instance, it’s easy for many to simply use the align tool in design software to arrange and organize objects. However, a difference can be made by using a grid system and zooming into each object to manually arrange them. Such detailed working style goes on to make a huge impact on the final outcome.

Stationery for Terrace
Packaging for Terrace

What you keep in mind should be kept in your design

The look and feel of the packaging are predominantly dominated by the product. However, simple and minimal designs stand out in a cluttered shelf. Before creating innovative solutions, it is important to keep in mind some simple points to make the journey smooth and obstacle-free. Staying simple and honest is key and so is researching consumers, markets and competition before getting onto designing. Also, packaging designs significantly depend on the type of material being used and hence a good understanding in such areas is crucial as well. Apart from that, product extension and legible typography are some more aspects that must be included in every design.

Packaging for Terrace

It’s not about who’s in the driver’s seat, but what car you’re driving

In the design world, everyone would agree that the clients have the ultimate say. But that does not stop any designer or design from coming through. It’s not easy of course and is a skill that comes with experience and confidence. As a packaging designer, it’s just not enough to simply create packaging that looks good; one needs to always have concrete reasons as to why that is so. Tell the client’s why using well-researched reasons and they will agree with your concept.

Packaging for Aura Cinema

For example, coming up with Tin packaging that could be used as keepsakes by consumers instead of using plastic bottles that the client initially demanded works a lot better to not only add to the designer’s portfolio but to work for the brand as well. Effectiveness is key and this way, designers can have the last word. But this by no means is disregarding opinions of clients. Designers must also be aware that companies spend two to three years researching a product before launching it in the market. Hence, it doesn’t hurt sometimes to try and understand where they’re coming from.

Published in Issue 26

Packaging is the first vital step towards enchanting the audience. Who doesn’t like a cute box or a trendy bottle? With this issue, Creative Gaga lets the cat out of the box to reveal the world of packaging design. Featuring various local and international designers like Petar Pavlov from Macedonia and Brandziac from Russia, Elephant Design and Impprintz from Pune, the issue promises to be a keepsake for many.

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE

 

ad here

We go through many interesting design projects each day and find them inspiring enough to be shared further. Projects which have the potential to inspire and spark multiple ideas. So, here are few selected Architecture & Interior Design projects for this week’s inspiration, enjoy!

Architecture & Interior Design

Artistic Abode by Shabnam Gupta

Architecture & Interior Design
Architecture & Interior Design
Architecture & Interior Design

Project Maya Somaiya Library by sP+a

Project Mosque of Light by Nuru Karim, related article ‘Bring a Change Through Architectural Structures

Architecture & Interior Design
Architecture & Interior Design
Architecture & Interior Design
Architecture & Interior Design
Architecture & Interior Design
Architecture & Interior Design

Designed by A2SM Architects, photography by Vaidotas Darulis

Project Moving Landscapes by Matharoo Associates

Art Inspired Home by Shabnam Gupta

Project Sarova Experience Center by Patch Design Studio

Architecture & Interior Design
Architecture & Interior Design
Architecture & Interior Design
Architecture & Interior Design
Architecture & Interior Design
Architecture & Interior Design

Project Golden Villa by Yana Prydalna

Architecture & Interior Design
Architecture & Interior Design
Architecture & Interior Design

Jung-e-Azadi Memorial Complex by Raj Rewal Associates

Project Tent Hotel by Nuru Karim, Founder & Principal Nudes

Architecture & Interior Design
Architecture & Interior Design
Architecture & Interior Design
Architecture & Interior Design
Architecture & Interior Design

Project Craft Deli by sP+a

If you have any of your Architecture and Interior Design project or someone else’s, which is equally inspiring for fellow creatives, then share it with us on contribute@creativegaga.com