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Chaitanya studied Character Animation at the online Animation school, AnimationMentor. He is an illustrator, animator and visual storyteller, who always enjoys bringing stories to life and evoking emotions through his illustration. While working at studios like Dreamworks Animation India, MPC Film and Prana he contributed on the VFX for ‘The Jungle Book’ and other Animated films and TV shows.

 

Times of India and Deccan Herald have published his illustration and he has also illustrated many book covers. He loves to illustrate in different styles, in a way that suits the material.

 

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Art is once again gaining its momentum among the public thanks to the influence of social media. Hence, we at Creative Gaga wished to understand and shed some light on the role and importance of illustrations and its place among the Indian Brands.

As the world grows increasingly mechanical and societies turn grey, our innate desire to find colour guides us towards the world of art. This ardent need for creative expression, coupled with technologies, can be stated as some of the many reasons for the increasing solidarity for art witnessed in recent years. Illustrations, in particular, are obtaining a singularly strong foothold on the Indian Brands.

“An illustration is an art of crafting an image to convey a message for a particular reason,” explains Sajid Wajid Shaikh, a self-taught visual artist specialising in illustration and design. Sajid’s artworks speak for themselves through their severe lines and abstract forms. Having partnered with companies such as Google, Facebook, and Adidas to name a few, Sajid possesses tremendous knowledge upon the use of visual languages, such as shape, form, line and colour to convey the necessary message. His artworks are often a departure from the reality, portraying the everyday subjects in an abstract style and often coloured vividly. “An illustration is engaging and independent of the boundaries set by the physical world, as they are a fraction of an artist’s imagination, which provides the room for artistic liberty,” said Sajid.

The artist attributed the growing popularity of illustration to its ease and accessibility. “With the advent of technology and internet, illustrations are relatively easy to produce and are quite flexible in terms of the time it takes to make the changes and get the desired image,” explained Sajid. He supported his statement with a series of his projects and commissions.

Illustrations for Granfalloon
Branding for The Granfalloon

“For example, The Granfalloon project. The Granfalloon is a production house based in Mumbai. The idea is to show a state of mind and location that brings people together who may otherwise have nothing in common. And so, we made the two partners fly on a Carousel, one is trying to catch a fish in the sky, and the other is trying to fry it,” explains the artist. “Moreover, illustrations can effortlessly give the brand its character, as they crafted to fit the brands’ needs, and are comparatively easy to make, change, modify and scale. Hence, with all things said, illustrations are taking a seminal place in the marketing and communication department of major corporations,” noted Sajid.

Stationery for The Granfflloon
Poster for The Granfalloon

Agreeing with Sajid, illustrator and graphic designer, Pavan D. Rajurkar believes that the growth of the illustration field can be attributed to three primary reasons: New Tools, Growing Modern Media and Less Manpower & Minimum Resources. “From my experience, I would say that the medium of illustration isn’t as demanding as other mediums like films or photography, which would require certain resources and manpower. One can communicate the same thing through illustration with limited resources and in less time,” explains Pavan.

Illustration for Vinay Electrical

Pavan D. Rajurkar has been working in the advertising and design industry for the past seven years, upon completing his Masters in Animation Film Design from National Institute of Design. Having worked for numerous advertising agencies such as JWT, Interface, and Radio Mirchi, among several others, Pavan draws his inspiration from colours, culture, mythological stories, and is especially inclined towards Indian art forms. It is this penchant for something Indian and local that has helped him find his style and visual language. Hence, what better authority to further explicate on the role of illustration?

Illustration for Vinay Electrical

Having attributed the growth of the field to three reasons, Pavan further elaborates on his points. “Firstly, the access and ease of digital tools allow creation and publication with much more ease. New tools including, digital devices, software, print & colour technologies have reduced barriers and opened new avenues. Secondly, today social media is a chosen hub to cater to a wide range of target groups, which contributes to the ever-changing styles of the artist. Since they are always on their toes, learning from different styles and techniques from around the world. On the other hand, brand requirements have also evolved with time in terms of frequency, promotional activities, design language and such. Moreover, their primary need is to maintain a regular social media presence which can be easily fulfilled by illustrations,” elucidates the artist.

Illustration for Vinay Electrical

Illustration in terms of brand designing is nothing new in our country. “The art of illustration has its share of history with brand designs in India. The industry is vast as many consumers, industrial products and services have been using this medium to build their brands and promote their stories, since time immemorial. Therefore, I believe that illustration is not forging a new place in the industry because it already has a place of its own. But it is evolving, as the brands reuse this traditional form of communication in a modern system,” elaborated Pavan.

Illustration for Natural Ice Cream

Thinking in similar terms, Satish Gangaiah provides us with a unique insight into the field. Possessing over seventeen years of experience as an illustrator, visual artist and graphic designer, Satish has worked with numerous national and international companies such as Bosch. “The field of illustration in India has evolved tremendously and have started to cater to a broader audience now. In my 17 years of experience, I have witnessed a lot of change in the way art used in creative representations. There used to be a time when there was a heavy reliance on the use of stock images. And now, we can witness this trend gradually fading. At present, there is more thought given about the ‘end-user’. Everyone seems to think of the prospective audience before the design process begins. That, in my opinion, is more professional and also renders the design or the artwork more relatable with its target audience,” Satish explains.

Illustration for Bosch
Illustration for Education App

Furthermore, the artist believes that present-day art and design are evolving to cater to the end-user or the target audience by reflecting the local trends and colloquial flavour. Hence, shaping foreign brands to be more appealing and approachable. “I have worked with multinational companies such as Bosch, where they wanted to represent themselves with a local context. They wanted to portray how their expertise in the automotive sector can help build local economies and create local jobs, specifically catering to an Indian market. And, they wanted to portray it to a vast audience in the simplest of mediums. Illustration connected them to their target group, and the project portrays this,” states the artist.

Illustration for Killer Launch

Approaching the subject from a different perspective, Nithin Rao Kumblekar feels that the market has been changing in different directions for the last few years. He attributes this restlessness in the industry to the ever-growing and ever-evolving development in the available platforms. “Maybe all were confused and didn’t know what medium works best for the brand. As we all know, print media has been diminishing for the last few years. And most of us had no clue what true digital marketing is, many creative ideas got rejected because the client was unsure where to put the money,” said Nithin. This disquiet in the industry reflects in the briefs the artists receive.

Illustration for REVV

The story-based illustrations no longer desired due to time constraints. In its stead, a plethora of creative methods got developed for the illustrations. These works of art are no longer confined to print media they are also being used in digital and television commercials. “Grey Worldwide, Delhi approached me to illustrate characters from their television commercial for car rental brand Revv. Initially, it was for the online ads, but later they decided to have these illustrations to be part of the commercial as well,” explained Nithin.

Illustration for REVV
Illustration for REVV

Just as print media, illustrators for online advertisements also have various format and size specifications. “In some cases, it is difficult to have one single layout which will adapt to different sizes. McCann Bangalore was designing creatives for promoting an event for TVS called MotoSoul. The event had many activities; clubbing all these activities together and then designing the ads would be a nightmare. So, the creative team asked me to create the illustration in a way that all the characters should be different layers so that they can move the required activities and characters from the illustration to fit different sizes and executions,” said Nithin, illuminating his personal experience.

Illustration for Moto Soul TVS

Nithin has also observed a rise in demand for illustrations in small, local brands. He attributes this to the increasing exposure due to digital medium, filling him with hope for a brighter future for design. “I have no clue how the market will change in the coming days. But I’m sure illustration will never go out of fashion. It certainly evolves with every step.”

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A Visual artist playing with abstract ideas through the medium of Type design, NID student Syddharth Mate expresses his feelings about the contrast in the changing and everlasting qualities of life.

Type Design

As a final year, Master’s student enrolled in the Graphic Design program at the National Institute of Design, Ahmedabad. Syddharth prefers to research more about the creative and aesthetic aspects of Motion or Kinesis in the realm of Graphic Design.

 

Thus currently stooped in the process of practising and experimenting with his own skills, nature of work, styles, ideas and so on, he wants to learn more about his abilities and be better aware of why and what he creates so that he could use his medium of expression as a designer to make the world in which we live a better place.

Type Design

Syddharth’s experiments in Type, thereby, are all about finding self-expression and learning about the art of motion in graphic design.

 

As a graphic designer or a visual artist, these experiments help him understand how motion can add or alter meaning to static elements of graphic design (type, form, colour, etc.); what role motion actually plays when considering aesthetics in graphic design; how motion/kinesis can help him visually communicate ideas better, as also what subjects or messages he’d like to communicate and why.

Type Design

Introduction to software like After Effects, Illustrator and Cinema 4D helped Syddharth explore various possibilities in Type with regard to what can be done with the merger of the medium with these tools. To thus learn more about the tools/software, he started exploring class assignments through them, learning by doing along the way.

 

Most of these artworks turned out to be perfectly looped – this visual effect of continuously ongoing motion in the artworks is acquired and achieved out of Syddharth’s intrigue on the impermanence of life.

In today’s unapologetically digital world, where screens have almost replaced paper, these experiments are exploring how graphic design also evolves along with the medium. ‘If you have a medium which supports motion, what’s the point in having just a static graphic?’ he feels.

 

Through these artworks, expressing his ideas about the world around him, Syddharth just wants to intrigue the viewer or raise a question in their minds, at least, about whatever he is trying to communicate – he would like these experiments to evolve into artworks which can convey ideas better, change people’s behaviour and make this world a better place. With that perspective, he is currently focused on learning Processing, intending that it’ll help him make evolutionary interactive motion art pieces.

Type Design
Type Design

Syddharth thinks, the people wanting to communicate with people will have to be very precise about how they are doing it. “We are already starting to shift to a screen-less communication system. AR, VR will be the new standards of design in future.

 

The messages will have to be more immersive, and very attractive. I think a motion element if done right attracts more than a static element. In an AR/VR realm, since almost everything can be created from scratch, motion and interactivity could be easily implemented,” he states.

Type Design
Type Design

Likewise, apart from the technological aspect, there is also a concern about what would be communicated to the future generations. Would it be the capitalist propaganda, fancy marketing schemes, trying to sell more products to people who don’t even need them, by exploiting the advances in communication design?

 

Can we, instead, use the same advances in communication design to promote something which is far more significant, like kindness or empathy? How can we use the evolved technology and communication skills to make people more tolerant? Can we communicate the right messages in the right way, to make this world better? It’s all a huge possibility. All these are questions pointed out by Syddharth, and it is time we choose well.

Type Design
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We go through many interesting design projects each day and find them inspiring enough to be shared further. Projects which have the potential to inspire and spark multiple ideas. So, here are few selected one for this week’s poster design inspiration, enjoy!

Posters Design by Syddharth Mate

Poster Collection for Retro Brands by Xavier Esclusa Trias

Posters for Bollywood movies by Raj Khatri

Branding & Posters for George Brown College by Underline Studio

Poster Design for Designit by Supernova Design

GIG Posters by Posters BluMoo

Minimalist posters by Vinay Gowtham M

Google Fonts Posters by Abhishek Garg

Motion Posters by Kickin

Posters by Jeremy Rieger

If you have designed posters or someone else’s, which is equally inspiring for fellow creatives, then share it with us on contribute@creativegaga.com

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Art has no genre, religion or language. It makes you feel the beauty of freedom. It is a free expression of the human mind, senses, ideas and feelings. Here are works of some prominent watercolour master artists whose work is nationally/ internationally acclaimed and appreciated.

1. Amit Kapoor

Born at New Delhi in 1975, Amit is a leading master of a watercolour medium in India. He has been recognised with top international honours for his paintings. For him, art is just like Meditation. His subjects include a lot of compositional works like streets, kitchens, platforms and metropolitan cities where the lovely play of light and shadow and perspectives are the main traits. He has also travelled a lot in the hilly areas of India and has done various series capturing them in their true essence.

 

Amit is a guest lecturer in many prestigious Art colleges like College of Art, Delhi, Apeejay Institute of Design, Jamia Millia Islamia and Meerabai Polytechnic. He is the Director and Principal of Anitoons The School of Art & Animation.


2. Bijay Biswaal

A self-taught artist, born at Pallahara in the Angul district of the Indian state of Odisha, and worked as a Chief Ticket Inspector at Indian Railways. He took premature retirement to continue his passion for paintings.

 

He uses different mediums to express his feelings; Oil Pastel, Acrylic, Pencil & Ball Pen sketches and Caricature. But he prefers watercolour the most. His artworks are mostly influenced by the beauty of Indian culture, dances and mythological stories.

 

He captures the stories of costumes, gestures, posture and scenes in everyday life in his watercolour sketches and drawings.


3. Dhritikana Nath

Dhritikana is an artist, instructor, teacher and content creator from Delhi (India). From the time she started painting landscape was the subject that she loved. Among Painting lights with vibrant colours is her favourite. Overtime she is smitten by the beauty of water, clouds, sea, animals, flowers and everything present in Nature.

Apart from watercolour, she explores different mediums like gouache, markers, soft pastels. She started her journey in 2018 and she finds it calming, meditative and focuses on improving. She enjoys conducting workshops with fellow art enthusiasts.


4. Kangkan Das

Kangkan had an interest in paintings from a very early age which was often manifested in various big and small creative outputs.

 

The time when he started realizing his inclination towards fine arts was a time when the environment and situation around him were not at all conducive towards the development of art and that too, in a small town of Tinsukia.

 

Although he works fluently with many different media, his favourite medium is watercolour. He feels that doing watercolour is just like shooting an arrow which once shot can’t be retrieved back which suits his temperament.


5. Kannan Chithralaya

A Thrissur-based, self-taught artist, Kannan has been painting with watercolours since the age of fourteen. After studying till Class X, he had to stop studies due to financial problems but he didn’t give up. He started making hoardings and flex boards.

 

Luckily, renowned artist, Asif Ali Komu saw his work and invited him to do an exhibition of his paintings. Since then he has not looked back and has carved a niche for himself in the world of art. Kannan’s watercolour paintings explore different themes. The colours he uses to give the paintings a more natural look.


6. Nanasaheb Yeole

Nanasaheb Yeole is a highly awarded and talented artist who works in all medium of art but watercolour is his favourite. He paints nature, landscapes and city scenes. The vibrant use of light and shades in his paintings make them lifelike.


7. Prakash Thombre

Sketch Artist, Prakash Thombre, describes himself as a simple, clear, honest and to the point Design entrepreneur and artist. During free time he cruises around the country on a motorcycle, travelling to remote areas, cities and urban jungles; sketching and photographing life in all it’s facets and forms. Keen on observation, his sketches are rather those of everyday people. Primarily a User Experience Design professional, his 25-year career spans, an array of media & industries, blending UX design, Visual design, Branding and technology to create compelling user experience across media and form factors.

More about Prakash Thombre here


8. Prafull Sawant

Praful is a 1979 born Indian artist who loves to paint and draw figurative artworks. Watercolour is one of his favourite colouring media.

 

Prafull has taken a keen interest in drawing from a young age. He has a unique style of painting as can be seen from his Kavi Pradeep and Subhash Chander Bose. He comes from an illustrious family of artists. His elder brother and father are both highly acclaimed artists. He learned the art from them and J J School of Art in Mumbai. He has exhibited extensively across India and his paintings have found their way across the globe. He has won many outstanding awards as an artist in India.


9. Raghunath Sahoo

Bhubaneshwar, India, based Raghunath Sahoo is an alumni from B.K Art college Bhubaneswar. He is a down to earth person and understands the woes and wishes of the common man. He paints mostly real-life scenes, people, children and still life. His use of light and shade is his forte.

 

As a young child, Raghunath often spent hours drawing in colouring books. Over the years, he has focused more on his own art and made paintings that almost come alive. It has been close to twenty years since Raghunath made his transition into a freelance artist and has very prolifically created thousands of art-pieces since then.


10. Rajkumar Sthabathy

A Pondicherry-based artist. Born in 1975, he has done Bachelor of Fine Arts with a concentration in Painting from the Govt. College of Arts & Crafts, Kumbakonam, Tamil Nadu.

 

Rajkumar works solely with watercolours and considers watercolours his language of expression, voice and signature. He paints everyday subjects like rickshaw wallahs and balloon sellers, families, fruit vendors and children. His truly life-like paintings and particular use of colours and tone produce a unique effect on the viewers.

More about Rajkumar Sthabathy here


11. Samir Mondal

Renowned and awarded watercolourist Samir Mondal was born in Balti, North 24 Parganas district, West Bengal. Mondal graduated in fine arts from the Government College of Art & Craft, Kolkata in 1975 and went to Germany for higher studies.

 

After a brief stay in Bangalore, Mondal settled in Mumbai. He illustrated political cartoons in watercolour for Illustrated Weekly of India. Over the past four decades, he has exhibited in India and abroad. He painted two watercolour paintings depicting characters “Ishaan” and “Nikumbh” for Hindi the film, Taare Zameen Par.


12. Sikander Singh

Hailing from Chandigarh, Sikander Singh was interested in Colours, Drawings, Paintings, Photography since early childhood. By and by as time passed his favourite hobby of painting turned into a profession which he loves and adores.

 

Around 15 years back he took up painting with passion and worked hard to fulfil what he considers his duty towards people to provide the best possible paintings. He has made several water-based, oil-based and acrylic paintings. He endeavours to capture the essence of a character through portraiture and to bring forth the nuances of the colours of nature in landscapes.


13. Uday Bhan

Uday is a self-taught artist whose portraits and figurative watercolour paintings have earned international recognition. His work has been exhibited and collected internationally and has received awards in many international shows. A resident of Kanpur (U.P.), India Uday garners much of his inspiration from old people, children, and nature. Although Uday has an unequalled passion for watercolour, his creative energy has not been limited to paper. Uday is one of today’s most versatile and visible watercolourists. Whether his subject is landscape, cityscape, portrait, still life, figurative Uday captivates his audience with genuine emotion, intensity and finesse that energize each of his creations.

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Forget technology for a while and try lifting that fountain pen or a paint brush. Dip it into the world and paint that stroke. It feels different. The magic that hands creates can never be matched by technology. Calligraphy is one such area of design where the old way rules. Graphic Designer Anup Shah does wonders with delicate letterforms to depict stories and create an aura. He tells us more about his meditative designs and his gratitude for the guidance from his father, Kiran Shah and calligraphy mentor Achyut Palav.

Calligraphy - Anup Shah
Calligraphy - Anup Shah

You are the World You are in.

In most instances, the environment we grow up in determines the likelihood of what one chooses to pursue in life. If the ambience around you since childhood has been papers, ink, books on the design they become your muse and instil a sense of curiosity that soon gives wings to your talent and sets you on a path of a lifetime – the path of a designer.

 

Such exposure is beneficial and offers a great platform to learn from experienced people. A creative environment is important for any designer and for those growing up to become one.

Calligraphy - Anup Shah

If you Think You’re Right, You are Right.

This should be the attitude of any designer in today’s world. Self-doubt is your biggest critique and is unnecessary. The process of design can be described to be consisting of the following key words – See, Think, Imbibe, Explore and Execute.

Calligraphy - Anup Shah
Calligraphy - Anup Shah

These five simple words can easily be the constitution that dictates the actions and behaviours of any artist. If one is sensitive to things happening around and make a conscious effort to capture the essence by reflecting them in their work, then one can say that half the battle is won.

 

And what this philosophy translates into is the fact that one need not convince anybody about what one’s work says because people will automatically understand and know.

Calligraphy - Anup Shah

Do Away with Technological Dependence.

For today’s tech and net-savvy youth, it’s imperative to understand how this may be hampering their design growth at times. Because what technology is doing is only killing creative strength by preventing thought and only allowing you to polish, modify and execute things which are already there.

Originality is losing its charm. Back in the days, designers would create 50 different options not variations to create a single logo. Today, it’s rare to see such an instinct. It’s all about speed now, it’s all about being the fastest. What this is doing is making them less designer and more operator.

Calligraphy is Relative.

Every single alphabet has its own sound and characteristic. For example, ‘L’ relating to famous singer Lata Mangeshkar paints imagery of something soothing, soft and silky whereas if ‘L’ was depicting Laden, it would be read as something bold, rough and wrong.

Calligraphy - Anup Shah

Hence, the letters never communicate on their own but always in conjunction with a central element or subject. Also, for those taking up calligraphy and typography, it’s important to make such hints as subtly as possible. In other words, create a story by animating letterforms to depict the theme so that when simplified forms mixed, creates an expression. Understand that every stroke should have a meaning.

Published in Issue 30

Since stone age when individuals were identified with certain marks, branding has always been an integral part of our life. It has evolved so much that now every success can be connected to great branding behind it, but still brand creation has always been a mystery. We interviewed the branding experts, who are behind some of the very successful brands. In brief, this issue is packed with branding and typography design experts who can help you solve the mystery of the brand creation! Order your copy here!

 

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In a want to make the UI and the internal functionality of the brand as easy as the services the brand provides to its users through its app, Uber teamed up with Wolff Olins to create their dream brand system through rebranding process.

Brief

Uber is a tech start-up connecting riders and drivers that turned into a global mobility platform in a short and quick span of only eight years.

 

Having embraced new and future modes of transportation—from bikes, to tuk-tuks, to flying cars, it needed a holistic brand system that was instantly recognizable, works around the world and was efficient to execute, accommodating all of its needs and services within.

Brand System

Solution 

Wolff Olins partnered with Uber to reimagine how the world moves, creating a system that connects with all modes of transportation, in all places, for all people—including internal Uber teams. The project was an intensely collaborative effort between Wolff Olins, the Uber Brand Experience Team, and MCKL Type Foundry.

Brand System

For All Places

With Uber operating in 660+ cities and having its highest growth areas in regions outside of the US, such as Latin America and India, the brand had to have a system to be able to work globally.

 

Keeping this in mind, Wolff Olins adapted a universal ‘beyond-simple’ global brand instead of pursuing a complex identity system, localized through colour and pattern. This universal system gave teams the freedom to make it relevant to their audiences with culturally specific content.

For All People

With a new wave of leadership at Uber came a renewed commitment to safety which until now was product-driven. But safety was a much larger context. It was the brand’s need and requirement to speak equally to riders, drivers, and employees, which led to answering the question, “What does safety mean for different people at different times?”

 

This resulted in the introduction of Safety Blue to the colour palette. It’s unique to Uber and meant to be used sparingly to indicate important moments of support, care or connection between the user and the brand.

Brand System

For All Teams 

The decentralized nature of Uber’s operations meant the company needed a system that could be easily implemented by a wide range of practitioners around the world in a broad spectrum of digital and physical applications. The system isn’t just for marketing designers, but for product teams, customer service, and beyond. Its success depends on how useful teams find it.

 

This required brand system of Uber is made up of nine elements, each one explained below.

Logo 

A wordmark instead of a symbol, the logo is approachable, easy to read, and takes full advantage of the name recognition. Optical kerning, refined weight, and defined clear space, as well as well-delineated placement in relation to other content, all help to make it as instantly recognizable as possible.

Brand System

Composition

The composition system is elegant in its sheer simplicity of use —  it creates a subtle “U” wherever it appears.

 

By defining the grid based on the logo, the system stays flexible and beyond easy to apply. The U-frame optimized for content is used for hoardings, billboards and other advertising formats.

Typography

The typography is as unique and easy to use as Uber is.

 

Inspired by the world’s best used transportation examples, it was designed to maximize its impact across all applications while keeping it easy to read, own-able, and highly recognizable.

Iconography

The icons are inspired by global transportation iconography and drawn from the same shapes as their typeface, creating a seamless system from text to icon.

 

The arrow is part of the iconography but can be used in copy as a shorthand between destinations, whether geographic or states of mind.

Brand System

Colour

A tight colour palette, dominated by black and white, draws on the colours used in global navigation.

The high contrast of black and white, the primary colours of Uber’s palette, make the text as legible as possible.

The use of a set of bright secondary colours makes the UI interesting.

 

The Safety blue, unique to Uber is used sparingly to call out moments of support, assurance and other important interactions between a user and the brand.

Motion

The motion system expresses the simple and easy movement that Uber makes possible. In an attempt to create a completely own-able motion system, the broadcast packages and the key motion states within the product are aligned in a manner to have just one set of motion principles and base motion states.

Photography 

The photography inspires Uber’s audience of young and old, partners and customers, local and global. It builds on how it feels to move from motivation at point A to the emotional payoff of arriving at point B.

Illustration

The illustration draws from Uber’s logo and the transportation language inspiration of the typeface. Simple shapes, clean lines, limited colour and heightened reality give the illustrations a branded feel and make it easy to understand at a glance.

Tone of Voice 

Uber’s global tone of voice focuses on the mindset they share with their users: they see the world as it could be and work to make it a reality. Beyond word choice and style choices, Uber’s tone of voice focuses their belief in putting their audience first.

Conclusion

Built from stakeholder input from around the world and tested on the ground with creative teams, Uber’s brand system is simple, flexible, and globally recognizable.

 

The learnings of what the business needed globally during a period of transition were used to drive their work of creating a brand that both served their business and engaged the audience.

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In the times where the number of users and their data decide the success of a brand or product, Lollypop, a UX-UI studio from Bangaluru, helping create engaging digital products for their clients. Here we have underlined a few of them.

User Experience - Lollypop Design

Client: Cricket.com
Platform: Mobile, Web

The Challenge

Cricket in India is more than just the sport, so it was a great challenge to meet the expectations of cricket fans while correctly identifying their pain points. Also, cutting through the strong competition and shifting a larger user base to cricket.com became another challenge.

User Experience - Lollypop Design
User Experience - Lollypop Design

Being information and data-heavy site with modules such as news, media, match stats and prediction engine; it was critical to creating a logical information structure and data grouping for the ease of understanding.

Define

After research, the team came up with a logical grouping based on the interests of users. Research also highlighted that users had a higher player eccentricity. Also to capture the attention of every user group within the first five seconds, the relevant information was provided in the first scroll of the app.

User Experience - Lollypop Design

Design

A card-based layout has been selected to provide a clear understanding of different types of information. Since it was a data-heavy website with different stats and matches, it became easier to guide users with a card-based layout.

User Experience - Lollypop Design

Also, strict grid lines were maintained across the mobile and web app version to help reduce the development time while maintaining design consistency. Used Oswald, a google font for its greater readability for numbers. And Montserrat has been used for the text as its geometric curve, it compliments Oswald well.

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Published in Issue 49

The Design in 2020 Special! Each year starts with many predictions, anticipations and a lot of hope for bad things to go out and good things to come in our life. The year 2020 has already started with eventful initial months and may hold more surprises in coming times. To understand what’s coming from the design perspective, we featured some of the best design projects from last year. Also discussed a few broad questions like how minimalism will affect our designs or what all an illustrator to keep in mind to be successful and much more.

 

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Delightful animation and stories with a good sense of humour is what describes Sonia Tiwari’s art the best! Be it visual design, coding or working towards improving the system of early education, she has done it all.

A Visual Designer with abundant experience gathered from places all over the world, Sonia Tiwari, creates animation and stories that attract the audience and makes them ponder. Adding a touch of humour, a pop of colour and loads of detail to her creation, gives her work an edge, as she always strives to create enjoyable and relative content for her audience. Combining her creativity with sectors of early education, Sonia is currently working towards designing products for children to boost their learning experience.

CG. How would you describe yourself or your work in one sentence? Tell us how this journey began for you.

Sonia. I’m a creative storyteller with a sense of humour who likes to draw cute things. I’ve always been a maker and as a kid, I collected ‘potentially craft-able’ broken stuff to paint over them. I’m from Rajasthan, so I have a cultural connection with bold colours but I owe my sense of humour to Indore, whereas Happy Valley has given my art the opportunity to become a part of Learning Sciences Research.

CG. How do you start developing a character or a design? Please tell us about your thought process.

Sonia. Before designing I try to interview the characters and the more details I know, the better an image shows up in my mind. Like for the cover of Creative Gaga, our theme was ‘Designing for kid’s education’ – I was thinking about how kids draw with their heart, so I drew a pencil with a heart carved out, that serves as a library, and letters and numbers growing from the trees representing increasing knowledge.