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Kevin Roodhorst shows us through the process he adopted to transforming a stock image of the Buddha into one that represents the mysticism and divinity the being represents.

Classic Image to Supernatural!

The stock photos that were used were bought on shutterstock.com. Working step by step on the image, aspects of mystical dimensions were slowly developed by adding external elements, colour balance, textures and the likes, thereby providing a supernatural quality to the overall imagery of the enlightened being.

Transforming

Step 1

This was used as the input image for the project. The main idea was to bring forth the underlying aura or vibe of holiness and divinity to the otherwise straightforward imagery that can be seen over here.

Transforming

Step 2

Started with masking the Buddha statue with the brush tool in quick mask mode. Once masked, a hole was created in the middle of the concrete pieces that had to be placed on top. This served as a base for the process that was to follow.

Transforming

Step 3

Here, the concrete pieces were integrated together and some shade was added to it, as well. The shade was made with curves. In the same way, the colour of the concrete was also adjusted with the colour balance and curve layers.

Transforming

Step 4

On top, a nice water stock photo was placed with some rocks on the side. It was then adjusted to tone with a curve layer, further adjusting the colour with a colour balance layer. The layer itself was set to screen mode while, for the central portion, an underwater cave stock photo that had been set to screen mode was used.

Transforming

Step 5

A nice looking coral stock photo was further picked up. For the basic underwater look, a solid colour blue adjustment was used on soft- light. The same solid colour was used for integration of the diver’s layer on soft-light along with some curves for the highlights and shadows.

Transforming

Final

A boat and some fishes were also used around the coral. The most important part was to make it look underwater, which can only be done by making it hazy i.e. brushing soft paint strokes of blue around the Buddha and lowering the opacity by quite a bit. Also, the particles around the Buddha brought a lot of realism. These are just tiny white dots with a lowered opacity and some gaussian blur applied. To make the Buddha look old, a lot of textures was added on top of it. Used cracked ground stock photos, likewise, were set to multiply or darken.

Issue-42-Cover

Published in Issue 42

Every designer wish to be independent and willing to jump into the word of freelance but most of them unaware of the fundamental challenges of the initial phase. So, we dedicated this issue to freelancers and interviewed some established and talented designers to dig deep for the expert advice. Kevin Roodhorst on the other hand, an experienced freelancer from Amsterdam, has recently shifted to be a full-timer with an Agency says “Freelancing is not all roses!” and shared the best way to survive as a freelancer! So, whether you are a freelancer or planning to be one, this issue is a must-read. Go ahead and order your copy here or subscribe to not miss any future issues!

 

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Tapping into a world that’s wonderfully chaotic, digital artist Satish Gangaiah integrates new-age technology with traditional art to bring out the central and common pursuit of his core project – people.

Wonderfully Chaotic
Light Me a Dream
Wonderfully Chaotic

For the series, Urban Contours, Satish steps into the shoes of the personalities, transforming each chosen subject to more approachable characters. Wonderfully Enigmatic people with endless emotions feature in every artwork.

Wonderfully Chaotic

Wonderfully Chaotic

All characters enjoy their own space, their own perspectives in this world. They all stand alone with their own different stories and perceptions.

Wonderfully Chaotic

The urban influenced illustration style paints interpretations of the world while the colours bring honesty to the frame. Gaining inspiration from various imbalanced, irregular environments, the protagonist is always put amidst the middle of this pandemonium.

Stranger

Journey

All characters are made to be expressions of their strong personalities, displaying what they believe in and what they are. With a look and feel that gives credit to the world around us, the common story running through every creation fluctuates between freedom and just being ourselves.

LSD Smile

Published in Issue 13

Coming from a country of stories and storytellers, Indian animation professionals are sitting on a gold reserve. Yet, we are miles behind the Western world. We spoke to few leading names to find out the reason and understand the Indian animator’s sensibilities and practices The house unanimously opined that we need to develop more original ideas and also create exclusive stories for animation, rather than going the other way round…

 

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Extravagance can be deceptive. Three art forms – photography, styling & illustration – are thus merged to create The Bizarreness Called Beauty by Lucky Dubz Trifonas, a visual portrait of the unfavourable side of contemporary fashion industry.

Uncovering Realities

The attempt was to break the veil that exists between the fact and fiction of fashion business. Sexualising and objectifying models are practices that are sustained casually off and through the ramp. Shaking away this indifference, these realities are openly brought to the forefront.

Saying the Truth

Bad dreams, sinful desires and strange fashion statements have been constantly represented throughout the series. Precise photography and loud hairstyles provide a conducive environment to depict these representations.

The Disillusioning

What resulted was a not-so-pretty picture of what is otherwise posed as charming. Pronouncing loudly the uncharismatic in a brave tone, this depiction is a pointed stare into the ugly traditions and practices thriving within the fashion world.

 

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Fashion
Fashion

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Changing jobs and switching fields never let Zigor Samaniego’s love for art die. It instead inspired him and gave him the strength to follow his passion and go ahead with what he really wanted to pursue in his life.

Just be Inspired to Work and Happy at Heart

Being successful and achieving what he has today has not been an easy ride for Zigor Samaniego. Experienced much, from having tasted editing of videos in a post-production company and working in the stream of info architecture to designing websites and being employed by a video game company, Zigor was neither inspired to work nor was happy at heart.

Just be Inspired to Work and Happy at Heart

He then took to freelancing as an artist and an illustrator which got him illustrating for some of the highly reputed brands like American Express, Nestle, Wired and their likes.

Though some of these opportunities gave him the chance to explore the world of 3D design and drawing, he still wanted his artistic freedom to let his creative mind and thoughts pour out of his imaginative brain in the way he wanted them to.

Inspired

Transforming Imagination to Impressions!

Zigor has always had multiple crazy ideas occupying his mind and conveying the same to his viewers’ works as his biggest motivation and inspiration. For this, he found 3D as the best possible way to express his thoughts and to give life to his imagination.

Though he plots the drawing from his mind, his artwork, from scratch to finish, is entirely digital inspired. Gone are those days when he would use the traditional tools of pen, paper and ink to unleash his creativity.

Inspired

Follow Your Own Style!

Comfortable and confident about his own style of working, he accepts requests and designs characters only which have the possibility to be designed in his way. It is a moment of pride for him when clients, amazed by his portfolio, call to hire him for their work to be delivered in his style. His style is defined by the cute appearance of his characters, merged with a slight amount of humour and fun, aimed at bringing a smile to the viewer’s face. Sometimes not knowing what to draw works best for him as the ideas develop alongside his doodling.

Nature, a Trigger For Art!

He credits his inspiration, innovativeness and ingenuity partly to nature and partly to his crazy thoughts. A nature-lover and enthusiastic about outdoor activities, he is influenced by the things he sees around him and sometimes draws inspirations for his characters and art work while trekking up a mountain.

Tips From the Master!

Enlightening the young ones with certain tips and tricks, he emphasises on the fact that having ones’ own style is a very important thing. In addition to this, the quality of the portfolio plays a very crucial and significant role in a creative’s life.

It is essential that the artist should remain faithful to his tastes and be very careful with the toxic customers wanting to change their style.

Inspired

Published in Issue 43

With the changing weather comes the season of Interns, with fresh new energy everywhere and your talented creatives wanting to test their skills and knowledge in the real world of live creative briefs and super creative professional environment.
This issue is a must-read for internees and fresh talents. Go ahead and order your copy here or subscribe to not miss any future issues!

 

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Visual Design

Here Sonia Tiwari explains the importance of Visual Design in Children’s Education and how every successful learning tool has been created using strong visual design aesthetics.

“Let’s make learning fun for children!” has almost become a cliche for our generation of educators, children’s book authors, toy and game designers, children’s TV producers and anyone remotely related to children’s education. We cannot ignore the role of a strong visual design in creating any of the modern day learning tools, whether they are early learning apps like abcmouse.com, khanacademy.org/kids or educational toy robots like Cubetto, Dash & Dot, Botley or BeeBot.

From baby years, children are exposed to educational toys and games that heavily rely on cute characters, stimulating colours, patterns and textures for tactile learning. As children grow older, their learning expands to more mediums besides toys and into educational board games, puzzles, video games, television, online streaming services and many more. At school, they come across interactive learning games, or good old charts and posters on the walls of the classrooms.

They’re surrounded by beautifully illustrated educational children’s books at home and school. They belong to a generation where several startups and established companies are trying to design new and more effective educational products for children and several Learning Scientists are attempting to understand how learning occurs in different settings.

Guidelines for Visual Designers in the Children’s Education Space:

• Understand Curriculum and Context

Are your designs representing a topic in isolation or in a broader context of a curriculum? You might want to maintain a common design language for the entire curriculum around a topic, to support continuity/correlation visually.


• Understand Visual Memory

In an educational environment, Visual Memory consists of pictures, symbols, numbers, letters, and words. As designers, the more we rely on design elements that can be “memorable” for the target audience, the better it can support the subsequent educational content to be recalled later.

• Consider what counts as Developmentally Appropriate

The Age-range of the audience, their developmental milestones, complexity of visual information they can easily comprehend.


• Consider Situativity

Where will your educational designs be situated? What are the surrounding cultures, trends, locations, demographics etc. Are there certain design styles that may appeal to this audience?


• Consider the Gestalt Principles

Make sure the visuals are clear and denote the meanings you wish to communicate as an educator. Gestalt principles are a nice, quick way to review instructional art/educational illustrations for any “applied” meanings.

Creative Gaga - Issue 46 - Cover

Published in Issue 46

Designing for Kids! We all design for different audiences and always keep trying to figure out what they would need and how will they react to our designs? But, one audience who is the youngest of all and most difficult to predict is ‘Kids’. So, to get more clarity, we focused on animation design, an extensively used medium to influence these young ones. We interviewed and feature experts opinion from the industry leaders such as Suresh Eriyat, Dhimant Vyas and Vaibhav Kumaresh to ponder on the use of animation for early education. Our cover designer, Sonia Tiwari, an animator, and visual designer, shared her thoughts on ‘How to make learning fun again’. While Suresh Eriyat emphasises on using animation as an effective medium for education, on the other hand, Dhimant Vyas and Vaibhav gave advice on how to make content for the young ones. This issue is full of veterans advice and a lot of inspirations throughout for every creative soul.

 

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