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Every designer develops a style, which can be seen through his or her work. No matter which medium you choose to work in, it is this unique point of view that gives an identity to the artwork. Shreya Gulati gives an insight about her bold and quirky work and delves deep into the process that helps her achieve this style.

Versatility
Versatility
Upstox Branding.

Deconstructing The Subject.

Shreya enjoys in fragmenting the illustration and having fun with each part as it allows her the freedom to create something different each time. Working on individual parts rather than the whole gives her the bold, clean and quirky style that is clearly visible in her illustrations. Bright colours, striking graphics and playful characteristics are synonymous with her style. She loves creating characters and building stories around them. Designing contains many permutations and combinations of applying art and problem solving methodologies. The vastness and the limitless possibilities fascinate her and this lends very unconventional and experimental expressions in her designs.

Versatility
Versatility
Still from the Video ‘Financial Management’.

Versatility is the Key.

She does not believe in any one particular style but likes to experiment with different palettes, treatments and line work according to the subject matter. Not being bound by any precondition and taking the flexibility to explore different mediums and have fun with it makes her each piece unique. Moving effortlessly through mediums her versatile style of work has taken her through illustrating a children’s book to designing an app for stock trading.

Versatility
Pseudo Sapera.
Versatility
Future is Female

Versatility
Pride

Inspiration from the Subconscious.

Inspiration is not something that is acquired but it is the objects, visuals, words or anything that influences you and seeps into your memory. She draws inspiration from memory, sometimes by referring to her Tumblr dashboard which is constantly evolving as she travels and records the inspiring things that she sees around her. Sometimes she also refers to the artworks of the artists she adores. She loves drawing human forms, especially female, mostly not clothed. Human anatomy and sex are the two subjects she enjoys exploring the most.

Versatility
Pop Stickers.
Musings

Design is Therapeutic.

She doesn’t have a defined design process but lays emphasis on research and scavenges for information. Whether it is watching a movie, reading an article or a book everything influences her in some way or the other. At times, the trigger is found right away if not then she analyses the data thoroughly and doesn’t stop till the cue is found. Solution lies in understanding the problem in depth and drawing a clear brief. It is sheer joy when your target consumer is happy with the product and you see your designs being accepted and becoming a part of your users. She enjoys designing thoroughly and finds it very healing and therapeutic.

Versatility
Obot Character.
Anamolies

Asia Map

Seeing Excellent Work Pushes.

In case of a creative burnout or when she feels creatively exhausted, she loves to surf the Internet to see some brilliant work. At times, images, visuals or powerful words that might not be directly connected but seem to have an impact, infuse great ideas. Being exposed to the great work being produced inspires and influences to push the bar further. Seeing good work inspires her but when she finds some extraordinary work it motivates her to push harder and work to achieve greater heights. The amazing and boundless world of design keeps unfolding in mysterious ways inspiring to work more and more.

Genesis
Imperator
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48

 

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Nature is blessed with a wonderful variety of things and one that captures the eyes of many are the animals. Created in various forms and having unique patterns, Richard Field, illustrates them in his own style using worldwide cultural influences. He elaborates on his nature inspired designs.

inspired
The Dark Owl.
Aiyana
inspired
The Travelling Turtle.
The Night Owl

CG: What is the story behind what you do? How did you discover your talent and how did you work towards making it more than that? What were your inspirations? What were some challenges you had to overcome?

RF: Field-inspired, a play on the words ‘feel inspired’, is my name as an Illustrator. Having been inspired by so many things, it’s nice to do some inspiring of my own. My collection started when I was trying to make a bit of extra cash selling flash sheets to tattoo parlors around South London. Tattooists are always on the look out for new artwork to display in their shops. I used to work on black and white illustrations inspired by a variety of cultures around the world. My Native American, Mãori and folk art inspired illustrations caught the eye of a few people on Facebook and I decided to start adding colours and working on a new collection inspired by some of the nature’s most iconic animals.

inspired
The Bull.
Giraffe
The Aware Wolf
inspired
The Stag Prince.

CG: Animals play a central role in your designs. Can you throw some more light as to why? How did you find inspiration in animals and their patterns?

RF: Isn’t wildlife the most wonderful thing we have on this planet? I’ve definitely chosen the best subject to illustrate. The shapes and patterns that it forms never cease to amaze me. It’s a great achievement to be able to put your own stamp on animals we see so often. I enjoy trying to add a bit of personality to them – the ‘Wise’ Lion or the ‘Truthful’ tiger. Nature is full of so much hidden beauty, the idea is to try to encourage people to take a closer look at the artwork and look beyond to read the halftones and patterns.

inspired
African Buffalo.
The Crowned Crane
The Last Black Macaque
inspired
The Mountain Ram.

CG: Your designs have a striking contrast against black, creating an illuminated look and feel. How does that enhance the design?

RF: In my current collection, I work on black using a similar colour theme across all prints. By using strong, bold colours on black I hope to encourage the user to look closer at the detail. It’s not easy working on black, sometimes the colours can get a bit lost during the printing process – but I love the end result. Hopefully, people like how the artwork jumps off the canvas.

inspired
The African Elephant.
The Last Lion
Zebra
inspired
The Truthful Tiger.

Published in Issue 28

This Illustration Special is best to know why and how illustration as a popular medium is taking the design world by storm! From evolution of illustrations to its place in the world today, renowned designers and illustrators like Abhishek Singh, Mukesh Singh, Archan Nair, Alicia Souza, Raj Khatri with some international talent such as Fil Dunsky from Russia, Iain Macarthur and Richard Field from UK, who live and breathe illustration, would be the right people to gain some insight from. With many more talents to explore with great insights and excellent techniques, again a fully packed issue is waiting to amaze you!

 

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Creative Gaga - Issue 48

 

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Conveying humour through ones individual style is an art form, not so common to be found. Diego Gómez has mastered this and gathered a modest but loyal audience in a really short span of time.

Humour in own style
Bagheera. Ink line art and watercolours

As a kid, Diego was the kind of a quiet person, making his own fun, paper toys, monsters, adventures. Drawing was just an extension of this, which he calls a Mind Printer!

Facade
90's Mindfuck

Not really knowing where his inspiration came from, but the European comics with exaggerated proportions, big hands, black, solid shadows, bold lines which made an impact on his mind. Always wanting to draw monsters, the cheap nineties music, video-games and Godzilla movies were a constant bombardment of ideas back then.

Jill, Watch Out

Not so much into realism, he is of the opinion that the techniques necessary to achieve a style are which only a few can master successfully and they should be praised for it.

For Ever. Ink line-art and watercolours
Martian Hearts

Defining the Personal Style!

With an inclination towards drawing in an exaggerated way, he looks for inspiration in the everyday world with a different perspective, like big eyes, feet, head, colours, or anything that is distinct.

Yōkais be hangin

Specialising in comic art, he uses a variety of tools to put his message across, like stories hidden in the background, messages on the wall, weird tattoos, background characters engaged in something and reference humour.

An Artwork Titled Dude
Chicken Blows

He likes to draw his characters looking at themselves, acting rude, which is a strange thing. He likes how weird people can be in terms of their appearance, their dressing sense and how they are painted by pop culture and this defines his style and concept of art.

An Artwork Titled Get Weird

Fascinated by the retro trends which are now hot again and back in fashion, he finds them funny and takes them to be layers of disguises, that end up being their own thing, something similar to Vaporwave.

An illustration of a Self Hating Base Boy

A Part of You in What You Do!

Conceptualising always involves things related to yourself, whether good, bad or ugly, the routine stuff like childhood experiences, depression and happy memories. Diego, in the future, is thinking of planting sillier concepts to farm happier thoughts.

Fight. An illustration showing the clash between real life responsibilities and entertainment
Cover art for a little song

When conveying the messages to your viewers, the use of reference humour simplifies the process for an artist. But of course, having an idea to start out with is necessary, which is then followed by the magic of illustration gripping the readers with humour.

Partners. An illustration made for a pet themed fair

Diego is the kind of a person who reads the whole thread of comments in a polemical thread, and while certainly having his opinions, he chooses not to express there.

Get Off My Head

Unique-ing Your Trademark!

The style of illustration, for some people, means drawing the same thing again and again in the same way in order to get people acquainted with ones work and also to establish ones’ trademark in the market. Diego hopes to do more than that.

Pan. An illustration made in support of a pet adoption season event

His style includes drawing weird people and weird monsters but it’s the technical aspect of doing his art which makes his work different from the rest and gets him clients.

Punks & Dinosaurs
An artwork titled Live Free

Doing the line art by hand followed by traditional or digital painting is his way of creating illustrations. With a personal liking towards the black and white layer, he wishes to have mastered the art of drawing lines and shadows when he was little.

Urban Bianca. An artwork for a Pokemon themed illustrator collective

Illuminating the Springing Talent.

Advising the young and emerging illustrators on stepping into the professional world, he suggests them to categorize their work into sections and then picking and putting the best of each together. This combined output should be treated as a piece of art in itself, giving it life by using different styles of fonts, characters, colours and ones’ personal design language to completely symbolize it with the individual.

Dating Cages. An illustration representing long distance relationships of today

Published in Issue 43

With the changing weather comes the season of Interns, with fresh new energy everywhere and your talented creatives wanting to test their skills and knowledge in the real world of live creative briefs and super creative professional environment.
This issue is a must-read for internees and fresh talents. Go ahead and order your copy here or subscribe to not miss any future issues!

 

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Creative Gaga - Issue 48

 

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Finding the modern in the ancient is a matter of vision and desire, to renew the old in such a way that is thoroughly transformed in not only its form and look, but its very fibre and perception. That is what illustrator Omar Gilani prefers to do through his rather fascinating interpretations.

Ancient Future
Desert Warrior Aunty.
Ancient Future

CG. Your range of work bears contemporariness as a trend that seemingly defines or represents your style. What inspired this concept and what is your idea behind it?

OG. I wanted to show what I want to see (more like giving a perspective into one’s outlook, interpretations, and perceptions). Science fiction or fantasy typically falls into very western tropes, and the subcontinent is usually ignored in those regards. That was frustrating, for me – that no one was depicting how this region may look in the future, and so I decided to give it a shot in my spare time just for fun.

Ancient Future
Pindi Boyz.

CG. What impact or effect do you intend this ‘contemporary’ or ‘modern’ element to have upon your audience?

OG. I just wanted to show that it is possible to create such kind of visuals and interpretations through such representations of everyday objects, many-a-times easily taken for granted. If anyone can look at my work and feel motivated to do something outside the box for themselves, I’d consider that a huge win for myself.

Ancient Future
Sitaar Player.

CG. What inspires you as subjects for your depictions?

OG. Just everyday things I see around me inspires me as subjects, and I easily find them worthy enough to take shape as depictions. We have a pretty rich culture and ancient history, and to wonder, visualise, interpret and finally depict how that would evolve – or not – in the next hundred to two hundred years is a rather interesting and exciting task.

Ancient Future
The Bounty Hunter.

Ancient Future

CG. What role does lighting have in your illustrations, and how do you approach and apply it?

OG. Lighting has a rather significant role in any realistic illustration. I use lighting to determine the initial composition of a piece. Dividing the canvas into simple black and white shapes to see if all the various aspects are harmonious, helps me do that. The lighting in the shot helps guide at this step, and it does go on further to play a huge role throughout the development of the piece as a whole.

Ancient Future
Smog City.

CG. How do you conceptualise what you depict?

OG. I have a fair bit of back-story for the world I’m depicting, and so it is a matter of combining a certain scenario with that back-story. Artistic elements like colours and lighting play a role in conceptualising, composing and finally executing a shot to create the final image. I approach it as thinking I’m creating a screenshot from a movie.

Ancient Future
Inner City Tourists.

CG. What kind of improvisations or changes would you like to intend to bring about in your style?

OG. I’m learning to work with 3D these days, and it’s already hugely improving my flow of work. An essential change that I would like to make is to just get better at showing what’s in my head i.e. depict more clearly and precisely the image that is conceived in the mind, such that it is represented effectively on canvas. Although, it must be noted, that is a lifelong, constantly ongoing and evolving journey.

Ancient Future
Panorama1.
Ancient Future
Departure.

Published in Issue 38

With this issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

 

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Illustrator, Siddhi Ranade, takes us through his thought process and the key aspects that goes into the tale-telling through his illustrations/art. He, thereby, goes on to illuminate the various facets, such as geometry, colour and the nature of the subject; how they contribute to his work, and also why design needs to be time relevant in constantly modifying times.

Siddhi Ranade - tale-telling
STILL A DEBT TO PAY.
Siddhi Ranade - tale-telling
HIDING THE OTHER HALF. COLOURS.

Every Tool has a Crucial Role.

Geometry, patterns, and symmetry are assets that enhance a certain piece of work. They add to the simplicity and alignment of the illustration. It enables one with various combinations during the execution, Siddhi feels. ‘Line’, though, is the dominating factor for him to get to that exact line that expresses the true meaning of the illustration/art. The ‘Colours’ are next which help him add a mood to it in a more dramatic way that further dominates the existence of the artwork produced.

THE WAIT – THE EXPRESSION. STROKES.

Siddhi Ranade - tale-telling
SURYATRI.

Colour Speaks More Than Words.

When Siddhi does portraits, he usually chooses to derive the colours from the life and experiences of his subjects. Through a brief exchange with the individual, he gets a tone of the colours from the way they talk and behave. “It’s all an entire palette performing in front of me,” he says, “All I have to do is just adjust it a little, and give justice to what I produce with respect to the subject. The colour gives individuality to the expression and the forms, narrating the best message of it.

THE DAY BEFORE YESTERDAY. DUO.
Siddhi Ranade - tale-telling
KNOWING–UNKNOWING. TALK TO ME.

Each Subject Varies as a Personality.

We all are made of nature. Every person is made of his own grid of life and experiences, embedded with thoughts. These various moods inspire Siddhi. As an illustrator, he likes to access this inner core and explore more of it. At times, he finds it hard, as the thoughts are a lot different than portraying the person; it is challenging to reflect him or her in the same way. While graphically redesigning the individual, the aspects of reality and the second nature he/she plays as an illustration/art need to be balanced with care. Tackling this becomes more of what he loves to do. That can be done in colours and textures, which add more to the subject.

Siddhi Ranade - tale-telling
BELLADONNA – NEVER BETRAY A BEAUTIFUL LADY.

Siddhi Ranade - tale-telling
ABHINAYA – THE EXPRESSION. STROKES.

Time Renews the Visual Tale.

Almost everything can be graphically illustrated and redesigned, but there is a need to reach to all those complex and tangled up expressions of real life that can be solved and enhanced in a minimalistic way. With a healthy visual bank, so as to find reference to the various aspects of life, as also to innovate, it is an integral part of a designer’s life to modify and update as the industry needs. Hence, changing the visual output is the need of time. The content remains the same, though the expression and the visual impact changes, which is the exciting and beautiful part of tale-telling.

Siddhi Ranade - tale-telling
A CLOSED DOOR, AN OPEN WINDOW. MIDNIGHT

Published in Issue 38

With this issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48

 

Prasun Mazumdar - Brand
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Experience definitely counts. Prasun Mazumdar is here to share tips with the young, aspiring designers and to guide them in setting-up their own little studio and coverting it in a brand.

Prasun has a mixed take on the new-age designers of the current generation! Some would like to be independent designers and fit into the requirements as they come, some would want to use their remarkable skill to generate a style that is their very own and work as an independent design supplier, with social media helping them get the applause they want and also it would extend to real profits and then there are some who have long-term thinking and plans who wish to and will set up their own studios (brand).

Prasun is a supreme believer of the fact that everyone is different and has different life experiences. Hence the way of approaching a challenge and delivering it varies tremendously from person to person.



Having said this, he still feels that there are certain common aspects needed to be kept in mind to run an independent design studio.

01. Setting-up

The first challenge for setting up a studio is the space, as it has a major role to play in the initial years of a design studio. It considerably influences the evolution of thought process and allows designers to think with a free mind.

 

As for Prasun, personally, the new concepts of co-working space, is not a very ‘design studio’ thing as designers are a crazy breed, they need to talk but they also need to be in complete isolation at times.


02. The Driving Force

The urge and the push to work is the next most important thing. Post setting up the studio, the idea of just doing minimum work should not be the sole or pivotal idea. The project loads go up & down with market trends and requirements but to have the eagerness to do more is always good for a design studio as it keeps the spirit going.



03. Time Management

Managing time is quite a challenge during the days of establishment. Balancing between client and self-projects, allotting a good 20% to 30% of your total time to personal projects proves to be of great help.

04. Client Relationships

Building good and healthy relationship with your clients is always a plus as it helps in carrying the project further even after the defined work is finished. With the designer thinking in depth about the project and the client being ready to accept the suggestions, provided they are practical and propose a profitable angle to their business, it is a win-win situation for both parties, solely built on the established relationship between the two.



05. Eclectic Mix of Skills

For a stronger team and the studio’s organic growth, it is of much value to have a versatile group of designers, rather than having all good at one or similar skills.

Issue 44 - Creative Gaga

Published in Issue 44

Yourself as a Brand! Who doesn’t want to become famous, when everyone knows your name and especially for us designer, it is the basic dream every design student or young artist dream. But behind every successful studio, artist or designer there are stories of challenges, struggles and their unique solutions to these. With this issue, we interviewed many well-known names from the creative industry and found their different learnings and experiences behind making their own self as a brand. Though they all have a different take on this topic, still they all unanimously emphasise on focusing on their skills and quality delivery of the final outcome. So, if you are looking to establish yourself as a brand in the creative market or already in the process of it, this issue is a must-read.

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48

 

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The Netherlands might be below sea level, but it’s pretty high up when it comes to design. Inspired by the 20th-century movements, the designs of graphic designer and illustrator Lucky Dubz Trifonas, combine future elements to revolutionise the design world today. He offers us a sneak peek into his world of design.

LuckyTrifonas, 20th-century
Real Tone Records
LuckyTrifonas, 20th-century
Benji B.

CG: Most of your designs are built around a ‘face’. Any reason why the face is the centre of your design?

LD: Yes, The human face and body (in combination with typography) is one of the biggest challenges for me to work on. It works for me because it enables me to impart my soul into my design. The face in my work represents the human soul. I try to create the face as though staring you in the eye so that a strong connection can be established with the viewer.

LuckyTrifonas, 20th-century
Donuts

LuckyTrifonas, 20th-century
Tribe

CG: Your designs seem to be very loud and expressive. Is that your design style? What do you always try and communicate through your designs?

LD: I used to do a lot of graffiti back in the days and the colours I use, especially the complimentary ones, descend from that era. Call it an old habit. It helps me fuse a bit of myself even in my commercial projects where I am always telling the story of the client, or the story I want him to tell. In my free work, for example, Donutboy, I like to visualise social criticism, dark humor, and rebellious yet justified views. But I also like to work with darker colours, depending on what mood I want to communicate.

LuckyTrifonas, 20th-century
Black & White
LuckyTrifonas, 20th-century
Nouvelle Donuts

CG: What local inspirations do you incorporate in your designs? Any foreign inspirations involved?

LD: My designs are inspired by the early 20th-century movements such as Art Nouveau, Art Deco, Bauhaus, futurism, and pop art. As I mentioned above, I used to observe graffiti and street art when I was younger. I always tried not to look very deep at every work as I wanted to avoid possible unconscious rip offs. It’s important to constantly develop and evolve style with every project.

LuckyTrifonas, 20th-century
Dance Release

LuckyTrifonas, 20th-century
Strange Fruit

CG: You seem to make extensive use of bright colours and patterns. Would your designs mean something different in black and white?

LD: Well, the concept and meaning would remain the same. However, if you remove the colour then you are removing the emotional response from it. Not to say that black and white don’t evoke any emotions. Design in black and white enables one to see the pure form without any colourful tricks or deceptions. I have recently started an illustrated black and white type project called AlphaBetty where I illustrate all 26 letters as representing a girl’s name.

LuckyTrifonas, 20th-century
Bumpeez
LuckyTrifonas, 20th-century
Got Me Puzzled

CG: How would you describe design culture in Netherlands as compared to the rest of the world?

LD: Holland has a very high design standard. Especially when it comes to typography and graphic design. Nowadays, old fashion and the traditional forms (i.e. 20th-century) are being pushed back to make room for modern beautiful forms and shapes. You could say it’s a design revolution that’s taking place due to the multi cultural society and its diversity. Especially in Rotterdam where my studio is based.

LuckyTrifonas, 20th-century
Donutboy Worldwide. Ain’t no half steppin’

LuckyTrifonas, 20th-century
Footstool for crazy feet

CG: As a designer, are you motivated by the past or inspired by the future? How much study goes into your designs before it actually arrives at a final stage?

LD: I always try to mix my 20th-century inspired designs with future elements to bring an eclectic mix. When creating a design, I always start at the drawing board and sketch for many hours till I find the right shape and form. This is followed by outlining the artwork and scanning it so that I can colour and trace the design on the computer. It’s a good feeling to see a handmade design with a powerful outline, especially with faces and typography.

LuckyTrifonas, 20th-century
Heartbreak

The colouring of the artwork is the most time consuming and on an average, it takes 2 to 4 days to complete a design. For example, the cover design for this issue took me 4 days. I experimented with syrup on paper to find the right form and shape for the letter ‘g’ and redesigned it in Illustrator. The letter rests on mud and grass, accentuating its shape and representing the floating world. The letter ‘g’, which was coloured using Photoshop and Illustrator, represents the river Ganga, that is a lifeline for millions of Indians who live along its course and depend on it for their daily needs.

LuckyTrifonas, 20th-century
Colour the World

Published in Issue 19

A typography special, made up of not only Indian type designers or designers whose first love is type, but also few very talented international designers who open a totally new playground with sharing their insights and inspirations. This issue has exclusive interviews with Lucky Dubz Trifonas from Netherlands, Indian UI & type designer Sabareesh Ravi and Shiva Nallaperumal, who believes, type designers are the material providers to all the creative professionals. Also, includes a special making of Nirlep rebranding done by Elephant Design and an interaction with the ace product designer Aman Sadana.

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48