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Hej Stylus! V3 is the first global pen stabilizer application for mac. It’s capable of smoothing out position, pressure, tilt and rotational values. It also maps pressure and stabilizes line drawing with the ruler tool. We have asked the team of the Lollypop to use Hej Stylus and share its pros and cons which are as follows:

Hej Stylus
Illustration by Elena Resko

Pros:

1. A useful tool for comic artists and illustrators who want to get their strokes precise and want to have control over their lines. Basically, the ones who want to improve line quality. Since it is good for tracing sketches and converting them to digital art.

2. The app has good tools that help in creating well defined geometric shapes and lines.

3. The app also enables to achieve the smoothness of lines.

4. The app can be easily used with the stylus or mouse.

5. It is helpful in creating vector art.

Hej Stylus
Illustration by Marcelo Gallegos
Illustration by Shimon Engel

Con’s:

1. The app lacks proper guidelines or tutorials to use for beginners. Though, it has a tutorial it is very difficult to understand and get started with.

2. The user interface (UI) of the app is not user-friendly.

3. The names of the tools are not visible on the toolbar, even when you hover on it.

4. The tools and interface are very technical to understand (Physics involved). For example, the meter on the app for stabilization is not easy to control.

5. The tools load very slowly, hence, it becomes time-consuming and is very cumbersome to use

6. The tools are limited to usage in certain areas only. It is good for people who sketch but it doesn’t suit every style of digital art.

More on Hej Stylus V3 here

Illustration by Gualter Amaro
Illustration by Samuel Labaute
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 47

 

Fun. It’s what everyone wants. So why not give it to them? Incorporating this very insight in branding and packaging transforms a non-living object into a fun-filled experience, believes self-taught visual designer Sajid Wajid. More on how adding ‘fun’ can make for memorable and lasting designs.

Branding and Packaging
RAJASAURAUS (THE ROCK STAR). This humorous character design for adlabds imagica ride can make anyone smile.
Branding and Packaging
Knowmad Sounds, Gig Poster
EAT IN HOME KITCHENS ACROSS THE WORLD.

It’s all About Adding Value.

Things that look good are important for the environment; they define a particular space. Good packaging or branding can add a great deal of value to a product. It’s not just about improving the appearance but the overall product itself. Good packaging is easy to recall. That can be done by adding humour or a fun element to your design. Packaging and branding can also make a difference in the sale of the product. And that’s where the feel-good factor lies for packaging and branding designers!

Branding and Packaging
Branding and Packaging
Album Cover for Eternal December
Branding and Packaging
Lala Hardoul, The Prince of Orchha

The Trick is to be Practical and Impractical at the Same Time.

If you’re just going to play it safe, chances are you will become predictable and boring. Today, products should be fun rather than being somber. That’s what people expect. In today’s times, the audience is open to being surprised by being offered something different. Everyone wants to own something totally new. And the only way you can give them that smile on their face is by taking your designs beyond your comfort zone.

KURLA. Everyone remembers a good laugh don’t they?
Branding and Packaging
Popsplatter, Coverpage Illustration
BANDS FROM BANGALORE. The personality of the brand is very well absorbed in these illustrations for adlabs imagicas ride, I for india.
MUMBAI BHAI.
DELHI BELLY. Illustrations for adlabs imagicas ride wrath of God.

No One Wants a Car in a Car Company’s Logo.

Branding is a symbol that speaks for the company it’s made for. It’s a lot more than just a group of elements that relate to the brand. The concept of branding has evolved, where a logo is meaningful only after it’s used. Branding needs to have a story to it, an idea. It’s like problem-solving through design. Brand recall is imperative and many people miss out on that these days. It’s all about being different and standing out. How well you can tell the story and portray it in the most interesting manner makes all the difference. Absorb the brand’s personality and play a little game of Pictionary with yourself. Simply keep in mind, the person looking at the logo should be able to identify with it.

THE CASTLE OF FEAR.
Branding and Packaging
antiSOCIAL, Gig Calendar for May 2017
DELHI BELLY. Humor and fun is the best way to ensure branding will relate to the target audience as demonstrated here.
MERA DIL LE GAI OYE. For all those who own a Royal Enfield would know that their heart beat lies in this bike.
BRAND IDENTITY FOR TURNING HEADS PRODUCTION.

No Matter What, There is Always a Limit.

Unfortunately, when it comes to design, a line needs to be drawn at some point. You cannot ignore the client or work without understanding the target audience. Imagine a Venn diagram, where one circle is you, the other is the client and the third circle is that of the target audience. The region of overlap between all three, that little area is where you work. That’s how much room you have to show your skills and creativity. That’s the challenge, but that’s the fun too.

CHEF CUPI D. This mascot for Kitchen Treasures tells the story of falling in love with your food.
THE SPIRIT OF COMPETITION.
Branding and Packaging
Sofar Bombay, Gig Poster
LEO (SUNSIGN). These eye-catchy hand drawn zodiac characters definitely work for merchandising.
GET CARRIED AWAY. Ratability can’t get better than using symbols of what people use every day in their life - public transport in Mumbai.

Published in Issue 21

They say not to judge a book by its cover. But they also say that exceptions are always there. There’s no doubt, branding and packaging are the faces of any business and product. They decide the way people will receive the brand; whether they will accept it or reject it. To understand and gain more perspective on this much-unsolved mystery, we invited many branding and packaging experts who throw light on the topic.

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 47

 

Anil KS trusts his instinct, essentially, while designing. Observing elements in his environment, he cultivates his techniques to simplistically present depictions that effortlessly spread smiles on people’s faces and make the world a happier place through his illustrations.

Illustrations
Tea Master. A fun illustration for a magazine featuring Kerala Tea shops.

For Anil, the design is a natural way of life, such that a person’s design sense and character are innately connected. Mainly guided by his love for traditional art forms, Indian mythology, sculpting and mural art, he’s always trying to bring his own style into his work of illustration, design, animation and typography.

Illustrations
Double. Amusing characters designed for an animation project.

Choosing a colour palette is a major aspect of Anil’s work, helping his illustrations to stand out and make easily relatable. Largely influenced by the living ambience and visual art forms in his hometown, Kerala, sharp and contrasting colours always make their way into in his work.

Illustrations
Parrot Man. An evocative illustration from a series of miniatures done for society6.

Trying to keep it easily readable in a silhouette, he starts out by scribbling the simplest, basic shapes, adding extra bits only later. Understanding the story behind the character helps in deciding the nature of the character. Anil always tries putting his personal touch into his work, preferring whimsical illustrations with humorous concepts and cheerful colours that make both, viewers and him, happy. That sounds like a win-win.

Horse Man. A colourful, whimsical and funny character designed for a project in 2010.

Published in Issue 34

This is a rebranding special issue focused on finding the answers to some of the basic questions like what is the right time for re-branding? or what all needs changing and how exactly? We interviewed some of the best branding studios like Landor Mumbai, Elephant, VGC, Inchwork, and many more. If you are considering rebranding or want to learn more about the art of doing it then this issue is a must read. So, go ahead

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 47

 

Characters – you’ll find them in comics, storybooks and fairytales as manifestations of imagination. Beyond that, elements like anatomy, expressions and plot are key in making a character appear realistic and relatable, believes character designer Aditya Chari. He explains the realistic principles one must incorporate while creating a character.

Kali. Illustration for a gaming concept. Depicts a negative character.
Tamohara. Displays how the character can narrate the story when placed in the right setting.

The Story Catalyses a Character

It’s important to know the story before giving shape to a character. After all, the purpose of every character is to tell a story. The story is built around their strengths and limitations. The props help them overcome their limitation and move the story forward. Next, figure out the role of the character in the story and layer your vision on top of it.

 

When you get content describing a character, you actually narrow down the choices and attain a more focused approach. This makes it easier to plan your character. However, when you work on your own conceptual art, there is no fixed direction. And you have to take the idea in your mind and put it down as a building block for the design. After that, let your intuition take over.

Character Design

It’s All in The Face

Facial expressions are most important when it comes to character designing. The eyes best convey the expressions, especially when in a close-up. The hands and the spine dictate the posture of the body, magnifying the emotion you try to convey through the facial expression. The expression is a window into the character’s mindset. Therefore, if you want people to relate and accept your characters, you need to design them to be expressive.

Character Design
Devi. The soft curves, posture and the facial expression keeps the feminine essence intact.
Character Design
Zoravar. The massive overgrown character has exaggeration that in no way disrupts the rules of anatomy.

Exaggerate What Anatomy Allows

When you are trying to draw from life or memory, your knowledge of anatomy is your main tool. You learn to look out for the landmarks on the body which help you put down your figure faster. Moreover, it helps you foreshorten the figure and also dress it up where the underlying body is not visible. Anatomy helps you understand mobility and the function of muscles. Muscles look different when they are relaxed and when they are contracted.

 

Exaggeration is just an adaptation of muscle and bone structure to the characteristics of the concept you wish to develop. This depends on what you expect the character to do when playing its role in the story. Characters like Popeye with huge forearms, Hulk with massive overgrown muscles or disfigured creatures from visual effects films, all fit into the same skeletal and musculature structure.

Character Design
Devi Comic. A very determined facial expression lends it the power that muscle lends to man.

Know the Difference Between Muscle and Mental Strength

While working with characters that are either male or female, it’s important to be aware of the differences between the two. Apart from the obvious physical differences, you need to bring forth the emotional difference too. Imagine combining the physical frailty of a woman with a very determined look when facing a larger than life scenario.

 

You have to make her look strong but at the same time maintain her feminine side. It’s about her mental strength. On the contrary, a male character would be more about robust physical posing and an exaggerated angry expression with throbbing veins and a muscular built. Even the design of clothing has a different approach for each type just as in real life.

Sea Creature. Irregular and bizarre. Follows the anatomy of sea life like the fins, the flippers and the claws.
Gorg. Complex, surreal and mechanical creature. Manages to get living feel because of its fierce facial expression.
Snake Woman. Body postures and facial expressions bring out the character’s personality.
Character Design
Character Sketch. Reveals many characters need props to help them overcome their limitation.

Published in Issue 14

We dedicated this issue to Digital Art where we explored the connection between our dreams and imagination and how the flexibility of technology can be used to document that. In his exclusive article, Android Jones explains the broader perspective of digital art. Featuring Ankur Singh Patar, Aditya Chari, Archan Nair Harshvardhan Kadam and Aamina Shazi Arora, every article discusses how each of them has an individual way of working and yet they all look at life beyond the obvious to appreciate it’s beauty.

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 47

 

Aditya Chari

A graduate from Sir JJ Institute of Applied Arts, Aditya Chari is an illustrator, a concept artist, a caricature artist and also a character designer. Having worked with big names like Virgin Comics, Prana Animations etc. he also has written two books, held few exhibitions and currently working on concepts for ‘HIRANYAKASHIPA’ (Indian Movie Director Gunashekhar).


Featured In


We dedicated this issue to Digital Art where we explored the connection between our dreams and imagination and how the flexibility of technology can be used to document that. In his exclusive article, Android Jones explains the broader perspective of digital art. Featuring Ankur Singh Patar, Aditya Chari, Archan Nair Harshvardhan Kadam and Aamina Shazi Arora, every article discusses how each of them has an individual way of working and yet they all look at life beyond the obvious to appreciate it’s beauty.

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 47

 

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Job

CEO and Founding Director of Lopez Design, Anthony Lopez, provides a good look into what employers look for while looking for the new generation of designers, creators, innovators.

How do you land up with a job, and more importantly, how do you find the right job? The two are distinctly different. The right job must ideally balance what you are capable of doing and your future ambitions. It all comes down to how you approach job-seeking.

Getting a job is an anxious business, let alone getting the right one. The first and foremost step is to do a self-strengths and capabilities analysis, giving yourself marks for both tangible skills and non-tangible abilities. Aside of looking at your skills, strengths and conceptual abilities, an interview panel will evaluate your portfolio based on how you showcase your work. Never try to mislead the interviewer. Title your entries, and present only your best, avoiding elementary work. Your portfolio should clearly demonstrate your strengths.

Based on your self-assessment and portfolio, start to evaluate the type of job you would be interested in, and which you’d be fit for. Start short-listing firms, and study them carefully. In the case of Graphic Design or Visual Communication, there are many types of firms you can join: advertising, design studios or corporates. Every one of these will open up different roles requiring different strengths.

Decide your path, based on what will be the right for both you and the firm. Start writing individual mails to each firm. The best way is to draft a master letter, which you can modify to suit your pitch to each firm.

Here are a few tips that summarise the key points to finding the right job:

1. Believe in yourself.

Be confident about who you are and what you are capable of.

 


2. Present who you are honest, and be yourself.

Show positivity, and ensure it is demonstrated in every attempt throughout the process.

 


3. Every firm has its own personality and character; See if there is a match, and write them individual emails.

It is not very different from locating your desired home and the right landlord! I often tell my future clients that we need to check each other out to see if we are the right match. This is a good step to maintain.

 


4. Your portfolio showcases not only your capabilities, but your personality

Craft it well, and ensure you clearly communicate exactly what it is you are showcasing.

 


5. Connect the project to your role, contribution and impact it had.

Most importantly, let your hiring panel know the context and the purpose.

 


6. Never try to fit into a job you are not made for.

It is best to be in a position of adding value and being an asset to your firm and team. Any false attempt will take you down the snake instead of up the ladder.

Published in Issue 38

This issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 47

 

Imagining a story in your mind about something like playing cards that you have seen since you were a kid and making illustrations on paper with ink can be very interesting! Anup Kokate’s work is one such example to look out for.

Playing Cards Character Illustration
KING OF HEARTS.

A cartoon lover since childhood, Anup was always inquisitive to know about those characters, illustrations and other artsy things attached with cartoons. Growing up with these thoughts locked up in his mind, he decided to take up professional training in fine arts as this was the key for him to open up doors to graphic design and illustrations, now a part of his heart.

Playing Cards Character Illustration
KING OF CLUBS.

Playing cards as a kid got him wondering and curious about what would happen if the playing card characters actually could come out from the cards and fight with each other! This was his inspiration to illustrate the playing cards series.

Playing Cards Character Illustration
QUEEN OF DIAMONDS.

Influenced much by the key rules of designing learned at the beginning of his career, Anup believes in simplicity rather than multi-coloured and jazzy stuff. Which can be seen in his illustrative card series where the monsters are created using line drawings in monochromatic tones and varying thicknesses.

KING OF SPADES.

Believing in competition with oneself, Anup is of the opinion that one should work purely for the satisfaction of the inner self and improve self-abilities and skills to be a part of the race being run by many.

Playing Cards Character Illustration
KING OF DIAMONDS.

Published in Issue 43

With the changing weather comes the season of Interns, with fresh new energy everywhere and your talented creatives wanting to test their skills and knowledge in the real world of live creative briefs and super creative professional environment. With this comes many dilemmas like where to intern and how to get selected in your favourite studio. So to bring little more clarity on current market trends of selecting the right interns, we interview some of the well-known studios to find their ‘Secret Process’ of selection. Where Visakh Viswambharan, founder of Appiness Interactive said that they only ‘hire attitude, and train skills’. For him, hunger to learn and go-getter attitude wins the real race in his team. Also, the founder of Wallcano, Arshad Sayyad, seconds the opinion of keeping the right attitude of learning and keeping up with the current trends & social media works for his interns. We also, gathered insights from freelancers, independent designers and seniors creative on the importance of an internship.

 

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