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User experience is embracing a widespread implementation of trending technologies like voice user interface, smart home devices, and much more. The basics of designing these experiences might have remained unchanged, but the birth of these technologies have definitely brought changes in user behavioral patterns. Thus, it demands new user experiences and solutions.

2018 has been a year when UX has been at the inside stage. Despite the fact that this sign will proceed in 2019, there are sure-shot trends that are probably going to rule the scene. Along these lines, we have listed 3 most important UX design trends that are going to redefine this domain.

01
The Paradigm Shift from Flat to Material Design

The ‘Flat Design’ focuses mostly upon minimalism — open, clean, and crisp edges, usability, and the addition of bright colors with the help of 2D illustrations. When compared to flat design, ‘Material Design’ took birth in the year 2014 and since then the UX design has drifted more towards grid-based layouts, engaging responsive animations, light and shading features, 3D icons, and much more.

UX Design
Source: https://appinventiv.com/blog/flat-design-or-material-design-which-one-to-prefer

In the year 2019, it’s time to say goodbye to bland minimalism of flat design — it doesn’t work perfectly anymore. Embrace the increased liveliness, interactivity, and detailing that comes along with the material design – the need of the hour.


02
Voice-Command will Continue to Evolve

The revolution of voice-command technology has paved the way for various voice assistants like Siri, Alexa, Google Home, Echo, and much more. Its bombardment has caused ripples in the UX design industry, which will continue to be caused even in the year 2019. It is expected that this industry is going to be worth the US $21.5 billion by 2024.

UX Design
Source: www.marketsandmarkets.com/Market-Reports/speech-voice-recognition-market-202401714

In the year 2019, designers will have to invest their focus on coming up with the designs, focused on voice-command technology. Designs for multimodal interfaces — a perfect amalgamation of voice and visuals may also rule in the year 2019.


03
Content-Focused Experiences

No doubt in the fact that content is king, but remember, the design is the queen and together they can attract user base across any genre or segment. In today’s fast-paced, highly digitized society, the attention span of a human has dropped down to 8 seconds from 12 seconds.

Thus, the designer’s role has expanded from understanding a user’s customer journey to telling compelling stories around digital experience in a limited time span. And this trend will completely rule in the year 2019.

UX Design
Source: www.marketsandmarkets.com/Market-Reports/speech-voice-recognition-market-202401714

Design, in 2019, will be much more informed and will revolve around customer wants, user data, their preferences, and journeys. This will be the year of live videos and increased personalization.

UX Design and Success goes hand-in-hand

Whether it is 2018 or 2019, the basic rule of UX design is that it has to deliver a flawless digital experience on all devices and interfaces. Planning in light of user experience will keep on being a top priority in 2019 as we continue to deliver cutting edge and consistent products to customers through the UX industry.

Rocklets, a popular brand in the category of chocolate and confectionary in Argentina, wanted to give away headphones as a present with the purchase of Rocklets Easter Eggs. Morphine Motion Graphics created two fun and cool 3D illustrations for the packaging design of the giveaway.

 

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Packaging Design
Packaging Design
Packaging Design
Packaging Design
Packaging Design
Packaging Design

Here is an interesting portrait series created on the phone by Miten Lapsiya. This series is a collection of celebrity portraits like Amitabh Bachchan, Sachin Tendulkar, Barrack Obama, and more. Miten uses very realistic paint styles like watercolor for this series. Thus the portraits beautifully capture the essence of each personality.

 

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Celebrity Portraits
Celebrity Portraits
Celebrity Portraits
Celebrity Portraits
Celebrity Portraits
Celebrity Portraits

One of the most popular and commonly used typeface/ font ‘Helvetica’ has been redrawn by the designers at Monotype to suit the needs of a modern day contemporary artist, reader or writer.

Font Helvetica

Used by numerous students for their projects to be used by brands like Apple and Nestlé in their logo designs, Helvetica is one of the most widespread and universal typefaces utilized around the world, thanks to its simple and crisp design. Originally created by Max Miedinger and Edward Hoffman in 1957, this Swiss typeface has been used by countless brands and has managed to remain quite popular even today. To keep up with the modern standards of this decade, Monotype has reintroduced Helvetica as “Helvetica Now”, which is simpler, clearer and more sophisticated than its predecessors. “The design introduces a new chapter in the Helvetica story- expanding its look and utility while reinvigorating its heritage”, says Charles Nix, type director of Monotype.

Font Helvetica

Helvetica Now has been upgraded to provide more alternatives for graphic designers and creative professionals, like having size – specific drawings with size – specific spacing and a wide range of fonts and sizes to choose from. Completed over a span of 4 years, the designers have carefully redrawn all the existing characters and produced a new family of fonts: 48 fonts with 3 optical sizes to be precise; which include micro, text and display. Overcoming the limitations of the previous typeface’s spacing and legibility, the three new optical sizes have broadened the scope of Helvetica.

Font Helvetica

Helvetica Now Micro has alterations like a larger x-height with wider forms and open apertures making it highly comprehensible even at smaller sizes (4-7 points). On the other hand, Helvetica Now Display has been enhanced to be more eloquent when it comes to big and bold messages as it eliminates the need to make physical adjustments to the spacing. The size which is ideal for reading and information-rich domains, Helvetica Now Text has weights ranging from Thin to Black, alongside adequate spacing and kernel, which makes is pleasing to read.

Font Helvetica

Apart from these sizes, the designers have worked meticulously to also create brand new alternate glyphs in this advanced Helvetica family. A single story ‘a’ and a straight legged capital ‘R’ with their own alternates of each weight and optical style has also been included. The designers have gone all way to provide a wide range of alternates for different purposes and have also included a suite Helvetica arrows.

Font Helvetica

Monotype has successfully modified and redrawn 40,000 letters of the older version of Helvetica and produced a font that is more applicable in modern times and provides more scope for designers. Helvetica Now is now available for people and can found on Monotype’s cloud-based font discovery system ‘Mosaic’. It can be bought as single weights or the complete typeface families at different prices.

Font Helvetica

Shaivalini Kumar

Always Start with a Sketch

Even though a lot of our work happens digitally, It’s important to establish a basic structure of what you wish to create! Physically sketching out the illustration is always a good practice.


Ideate

While ideating, create mood-boards, mind maps and write down everything that seems enticing. Narrow down on what you wish to create gradually and you’ll get your core idea.


Get Inspiration

Gathering inspiration is an important part of the process. Inspiration can also come from the smallest of things be it a conversation, a person, a place or a thought.


Build a Story

A trick can be used while illustrating characters is writing a short story around them, that entails details about the character’s personality traits. It makes the process of illustrating the character much more engaging.

Be Informed

Reading about areas outside of design is important for gathering content and making your illustration relatable to a larger number of people.


Experiment

Sometimes spontaneous decision to experiment with colours, textures, shapes and forms, can lead to unpredictable outcome, which can be interesting and unique.


Trial Runs

It’s okay to start from scratch, even multiple times. You may often end- up starting all over – but that contributes to making the final illustration much more refined and closer to what your core idea.

Render and Detail

Once you establish your base illustration, adding hints of details that are complementary to the forms will bring more life to what you have drawn.


Get Feedback

It’s always good to see what people feel about your creation and process, by getting feedback on your work you may be able to identify points that you might have missed out.


Practice

A lot! As you know, practice can make you perfect!

Published in Issue 30

We interviewed the branding experts, who are behind some of the very successful brands. Lopez Design, have shared the story behind the recently developed branding of ‘Bihar Museum‘ and also shared the basics of brand creation in the ‘Gyaan’ section. Young visual communication designer like Shaivalini Kumar shared her love for the letter design while experienced graphic designer Anup Shah dwelled upon his passion for calligraphy. In brief, this issue is packed with branding and typography design experts who can help you solve the mystery of the brand creation!

 

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Pippa Dyrlaga is a paper cutting artist and print maker based in England. Her work is a perfect example of patience and precision. One gets drawn into the dizzying lines of her paper cut art. She spends hours on each piece as she first hand draws on the reverse of the paper and then meticulously cuts out the shapes using a scalpel.

Paper Cut Art
Foraging in the Tree Tops
Paper Cut Art
Heron
Paper Cut Art
Between the Willow
Paper Cut Art
Paper Cut Art
Paper Cut Art
Collaboration with Impression Originale
Paper Cut Art
Crow
Paper Cut Art
Riverside II
Paper Cut Art
The Garden
Paper Cut Art
Sinking
Paper Cut Art
Sinking III
Paper Cut Art
Hummingbird Flight
Paper Cut Art
Symbiosis
Paper Cut Art
Biophilia I
Paper Cut Art
Thread
Paper Cut Art
The Bear
Paper Cut Art
Stag Beetle
Paper Cut Art
A Peace Offering From the Land Dwellers
Paper Cut Art
Kraken
The Lepidopterist
The Ornithologist
Forest Spirit
Paper Cut Art
The White Wolf
Totoro
Let's make an Agreement
Martini - Langleys Gin Collaboration
Geometric
Paper Lace
Durham Cathedral

In an exclusive interview with Creative Gaga, storyboard artist Sachin Tiwari has given tips and shared his insights about creating a storyboard.

Storyboarding
Storyboarding

CG. What was your inspiration to choose the field of animation as your career?

Sachin. Growing up watching animated series like He-man, Barba-papa and many others. Seeing the characters perform various actions like talk, laugh move and dance always fascinated me. I wondered how it all works. Loving to draw, I would copy those characters in my sketchbook or even on any surface where I could draw, and eventually it took-up as a profession by undergoing a formal training from a reputed animation production house. This marked the start of my professional journey as an Animation artist.

Storyboarding
Storyboarding
Storyboarding

CG. What is a storyboard and what is it’s importance in a project? What are the different fields where story boards are essential?

Sachin. Storyboard is a shot by shot sequence of any written script represented visually using graphics or illustrations. It explains how the video will unfold shot by shot or look like on screen just like a comic book. It is very important for a video/visual-based project to have a proper storyboard of the script being produced.

Storyboarding
Storyboarding

In our everyday lives, sometime we have to draw a rough sketch to explain our point of view to make it easy to understand. Similarly storybord is like a road-map to visualise something which otherwise is not easily understood only through written words of the script.

Visuals make people understand the whole thing better. Thus, a storyboard undoubtedly plays a significant role in video production when a director needs to make the production staff understand his vision and show how exactly the product is going to be mapped out.

Storyboarding

These days many industries, apart from the animation sector, such as advertisement, live-action films, business explainers, television production etc., use storyboarding for their productions. The art of storyboarding is a powerful tool to help communicate ideas, and when used properly it helps to avoid common mistakes like a broken storyline, mis-matched dialogue and playback timing issues and keeps the whole team aware of what is to be done.

CG. As stories are integral part of storyboarding. But how critical are the characters of the story?

Sachin. Our sense of curiosity engages us to see what will happen next. Stories capture attention and we are hardwired to respond to that. An artist while drawing the storyboard, aims at creating visuals that convey the right message and the storyline and are relatable too, by the people. For this, a character is must to imbue the emotions. A story/plot is always designed or said to give a message, but without a character or protagonist, it is not possible to create any storyboard.

CG. What are the different kinds of projects that you take up and how do you decide upon the concept of creating a storyline for your projects?

Sachin. Majority of the projects I work on are story-driven cartoon film productions which are either episodic or full-length films. To start a project, one needs to understand about a few things like references, layout, framing, layering and lastly finishing. Although boarding is a team-based activity and anyone can contribute, but in today’s scenario storyboarding artists have to create and complete a storyboard, more or less, individually and have it approved by the directors.

CG. What are the different mediums that you use for creating story-boards?

Sachin. I personally don’t find myself dependent on any particular medium to create a storyboard. Choosing the medium should be result oriented, whether you use pencil paper, or any kind of computer-based software. In general, I use a paper and a pencil to create rough basic thumbnails. They’re pretty much scribbled for my reference. When satisfied with my scribbled drawings, I start creating them digitally with Adobe Flash. After translating the thumbnails into fine drawings, I then add the sound to set the storyline and timings for the final output.

CG. Time frames are an essential requirement for any creative project. How does time framing make a difference to the final outcome? And how do you balance?

Sachin. Yes, time frames are always there, and I try to adhere to them as much as possible but not at the cost of compromising the quality of work. I pass on the final work to the client only after being satisfied with the desired quality. I don’t prefer taking up projects with unrealistic time frames or where it is difficult to provide satisfactory results.

CG. What are the important factors to be kept in mind while storyboarding for a project?

Sachin. I work as a freelance boarding artist. Freelance means that you don’t always have work but the upside of working freelance is that no two projects are the same. There is ample variety and it is exciting to work on animation projects of different styles.

But still there are some important factors or a checklist, which remain same for every project and should be kept in mind, like:

 

+ Have I read the whole script?


+ Do I know the storyline?


+ How am I going to execute the scene?


+ Do I know the essence of the scene?


+ Do I have the proper material such as character sheets, prop sheets, backgrounds, audio etc.?


+ Do I have proper references?


+ Is my scene in-sync with the style of the animation required and flow of the episode?


+ Are characters matching with the layouts’ perspective?


+ Do I know where to minimize my efforts without affecting the quality?


+ Am I doing something to make the simple scenes better?


+ Am I planning according to the time deadline?

Issue 45

Published in Issue 45

When celebrations are all around for the new year, everyone is curious about what this new year will bring. So, the rounds of looking back to the past year and trying to predict the new one starts. We started the same exploration through this issue by reaching various experts for their take on the trends for their respective fields. So, go ahead.

 

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Advertising is one such arena where one can achieve as much as they’d like; provided, that they’ve got the skills, talent and of course the courage. Nasheet Shadani, believes it’s for every illustrator to make the most of this opportunity and create magical pieces that can manifest themselves as memorable communications.

Advertising
Poster for Vodafone India
Advertising
Poster for Vodafone India
Advertising
Poster for Vodafone India

If the Idea is the Soul of Any Work Then Illustration is the Body.

It is common belief that it’s tough for a fresh college graduate to walk in with a portfolio and land into advertising directly. Common notions are that one needs ‘contacts’ and ‘references’. That’s not true. A good portfolio is the key into this exciting world, provided that the work contains not only cool designs and illustrations, but strong and unique ideas behind them as well. Once you make your way in, the world is yours. And for an illustrator, it’s a very exciting place. There is a bit of illustration in everything you create, whether it’s a logo design, typography, calligraphy or even a photo shoot.

Advertising
Poster for Vodafone India
Advertising
Poster for Vodafone India
Advertising
Poster for Vodafone India
Advertising

Love Problems More Than Solutions.

Pablo Picasso once said, “God is really only another artist. He invented the giraffe, the elephant and the cat. He has no real style, He just goes on trying other things”. Once a new style is cracked, the job is done. Then it’s all about moving on to explore something new. It’s important to go for the best style that suits the brief rather than retro fitting what you are good at. It also depends on the brief, if the best solution is a minimal vector graphic then why waste energy and time in creating intricate miniature art?

Poster for Vodafone India
Poster for Vodafone India
Dancer Meets Potter, Dancer Meets Puppet. Surajkund Mela theme is used to invite people on behalf of Vodafone using vivid and vibrant illustrations.

Do the Doodle.

Whatever is the result, it all starts with a doodle. Never sit on the computer directly. It is always better to think, let your subconscious work on the problem then transfer your thoughts into paper and use that doodle as a building block. Remember that even though we’ve got incredible programs and software at our disposal, they can’t do the thinking; they cannot generate ideas. Surrounding yourself with interesting and creative things can help inspire. Whether it’s things you collect from your travels or simply dig deep into the rich Indian culture, design and artistic forms are all around us.

The Elves and the Shoemaker, Santa’s Gift and Wicked Harry.

What’s Stopping You?

Short deadlines, overnight work, client’s not so friendly feedback and budget issues are few things that, sometimes, stop us in doing great work. But it ultimately depends on the kind of brand you’re working with. There are clients like Vodafone who love illustrations and there are other clients who are more focused on photo shoots or stock images. Can you imagine Amul advertising without those funny illustrative ads? Once you figure out that illustration is the best answer to this brief then the real job starts to convince the client on the benefit of using illustration in that particular case. Illustration in advertising is very different from illustrations elsewhere. Here, every single line must serve a purpose and should add to that overall message.

Advertising
ORIYA, URDU, MALAYALAM. A campaign to promote the dying art of calligraphy.
Advertising
COUPLE. A print ad to show the ill effects of bad breath in a funny way.
Advertising
Illustration for Taxi Fabric

Published in Issue 24

Gone are the days when Illustrations would take a back seat. Now, they are becoming more proactive and are evolving the way we communicate. This time, Creative Gaga focuses on how the advertising world is opening its doors to this exciting form of design. Featuring renowned Illustrators like Chris Beatrice, Nasheet Shadani, Vijay Kumar, Gabriel Mareno and much more, this issue promises to leave no page unturned!

 

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