1

Aman Khanna

A graphic artist, illustrator, sculptor and a visual storyteller, Aman Khanna has his hands full with ‘Infomen’ that he started in London in 2005 and ‘Infonauts’ in New Delhi in 2009. His latest venture goes by the brand name ‘Claymen’ which is a set of functional and dysfunctional objects as well as unique handcrafted sculptures.


Featured In


This issue has advice from many experts such as Ashwini Deshpande and Gopika Chowfla who gave the secrets of choosing the right intern for their well-known design teams. And on another hand, Rajaram Rajendran and Ranganath Krishnamani advise young designer to gain multiple skills and be the best at them.

Related Posts


No posts were found.


Find Him Here


CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48
Widget Image

 

POST TAGS:

Bored of two dimensional design, Aman Khanna started exploring the third dimension of it by getting his hands dirty, literally! He got inspired by local Indian potters who breathe magic into a simple raw material like clay. Aman started molding sculptures and day to day knick knacks from clay.

Your Hands Dirty
Gray Water
Your Hands Dirty
Seek and How
Your Hands Dirty
Colour Me White
Your Hands Dirty
Pourer
Your Hands Dirty
Conscience of a Subconscious Mind
Your Hands Dirty
Shared Burden

What People Want

In India, the design is perceived in various ways; what works about Claymen is that it caters to a wide spectrum of users. Functional objects satisfy the practical shopper; dysfunctional art-oriented pieces attract the fanatics and the clay sculptures appeal to almost anyone who looks at them. Aman clearly understands the needs and more importantly the wants of the people thereby bringing to the table a fresh take on art.

Your Hands Dirty
Man and Woman v/s Society
Your Hands Dirty
The New Mountain
Your Hands Dirty
Mess is more - Bottle
Your Hands Dirty
Planter
Your Hands Dirty
Flask
Your Hands Dirty
Crow Bottle

A Shout Out to All

The theme of his project follows the daily routine of a common man; his ups and downs are captured beautifully in objects like lamps, cups and sculptures. The choice of colours and the fact that each piece is an outcome of love and painstaking labour is what sells across stores in Mumbai, Delhi, Bangaluru and soon in Melbourne

Your Hands Dirty
The Attachment
Your Hands Dirty
Balancing Vase
Your Hands Dirty
Scream
Your Hands Dirty
Lost In The Noise
Your Hands Dirty
Loud Mouth
Your Hands Dirty
Brain Drain

Exploring Forms Through Material.

Being inspired by local Indian potters, Aman tried his hand at clay sculptures; clay as a material is quite versatile and at the same time simple. Hence the exploration of design and expression of his thought process is quite clear. The idea behind using clay was because it is commonly used and worked with; making the theme of common men and his life more relatable.

Your Hands Dirty
Hyperventilating Vase
Your Hands Dirty
Release
Your Hands Dirty
The Balancing Act
Your Hands Dirty
Distressed Planter
Your Hands Dirty
Holler Kettle

Published in Issue 32

This issue has advice from many experts such as Ashwini Deshpande and Gopika Chowfla who gave the secrets of choosing the right intern for their well-known design teams. And on another hand, Rajaram Rajendran and Ranganath Krishnamani advise young designer to gain multiple skills and be the best at them.

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48
Widget Image

 

Vivek Nag

Vivek Nag is based in Mumbai and is currently Faculty of Pre-Visualization and Comic Book Design at Whistling Woods International, School of Animation.


Featured In


This issue is dedicated to the talented design graduates who are not just looking to work but seeking experience in order to realise the greater goal of life. The issue features various designers from India and abroad. Kevin Roodhorst from The Netherlands realised his goal so early in life that propelled him to start his career as a designer as young as 13. To name a few talents we have Vivek Nag from Fine Arts from Rachna Sansad Mumbai, Simran Nanda from Pearl Academy New Delhi, Anisha Raj from MAEER MIT Institute of Design Pune, Giby Joseph from Animation and Art School Goa and many more. This issue gives a fresh perspective of talented graduates and their unique approach to design.

Related Posts


No posts were found.


Find Him Here


CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48
Widget Image

 

POST TAGS:

Gone are the days of drawing a portrait using pencils and brushes. Digital is the new canvas and Photoshop is the new tool. Digital Illustrator, Vivek Nag is fascinated by ‘Sadhus’ and here he takes us through the making of a portrait using Photoshop.

Portrait

Step 01

The first step is to make a rough patchy sketch of the character. It’s best to do this using a chalk brush or special Photoshop brushes which are meant to replicate a traditional look on the digital canvas. The lines mostly trace the shadows and/or contours of the face as seen in the image.

Portrait

Step 02

Taking the rough sketch as the base, the next step is to start making line art. This is made using the pressure sensitive round hard brush to create thin and to the point lines. Detailing is important in this step. Building upon the rough chalky sketch is beneficial. When satisfied, hide the sketch layer to proceed.

Portrait

Step 03

The next step is to start with the colours. Irrespective of the colours being used in the portrait, it’s best to dim down the background. This offers contrast and a better understanding of how bright the colours that are being used in the painting actually are. The next step is to make a palette of colours using the original image. Depending on the intricacy of colors in a photograph, it’s advisable to make a palette of 5 to 8 colors. In this case, a palette of six colours was used. It’s best to select colours in such a way that for any other shade or tint you require, one’s ability to create that using a combination of the set colours in the palette. As seen above, start filling the composition with patchwork. Using flats helps launch into the fray of the painting.

Portrait

Step 04

Taking the previous step forward, it’s now all about concentrating on detailing. Smaller brush strokes are employed as well as the colours being used are more varied. Notice how the freedoms of the strokes have become a little more restricted here. The line art acts as guiding points and this is the stage where it is put to most use.

Portrait

Step 05

Minute details start from here. The eyes are the most important part of a portrait. A lot can be conveyed from the eyes. For the most natural look, one needs to make the eyes detailed and relatable. The blending of the strokes also starts from this step. As is evident in the image, a certain level of ‘rawness’ is maintained with every stroke rather than applying a smooth blend. Keeping hints of patches provides a natural feel, especially on the skin. Also, one needs to keep the sheen of the eye in mind that is executed with a simple brush stroke, keeping minimal blending. The more striking the sheen, the better the eye tends to look.

Depending on the intricacy of colours in a photograph, it’s advisable to make a palette of 5 to 8 colours while performing a digital sketch.

Portrait

Step 06

The next step is replicating the previous steps with the lips and beard. Here, treat lips the same way skin near the eyes was treated. The beard however forms a rather tricky part of the portrait. The beard is mainly just brushed strokes with hardly any blending at all. The direction and the thickness of each stroke matters. For example, the brushes below the lip and at the origin of the beard are thick, whereas the strokes in the beard are rather fine.

Portrait

Step 07

The prior two steps are repeated on the remaining parts of face. The sides of the face are left undone because it will add on to the next steps. There are still many strokes on the face which are strongly patchy and look undone. However, this adds to the composition. The parts of any illustration with the most amount of detail and/or contrast attracts attention first; in this case, the eyes.

Portrait

Step 08

Once the face is done, this is where one needs to start working on the background. Against the already set dull gray background, start putting horizontal strokes with fine art brushes. The colours used are part of the portrait itself – reds, yellows and whites. This enables the background to compliment the main subject of the painting and establishes a flow to the composition. But also remember not to steal the focus from the subject by using colors that are too vibrant.

Portrait

Step 09

This step is called ‘The Haze’. This is where the focal points and edges are merged into the background. For example, the yellow ochre on the forehead is transformed into a form of smoke (haze) which drifts away from the head. This is still done using fine art brushes. Along with that, more horizontal strokes have been pulled around the beard and hair. These strokes are pulled in about 30% opacity and serve to blend the edges till the background looks like a part of the subject itself.

Portrait

Step 10

The last and final step is to add a layer mask. This is where curves are applied to the artwork. This is where contrast is also added to the painting. This helps the shades to pop out and there is a lot more depth than there was before.

Published in Issue 22

This issue is dedicated to the talented design graduates who are not just looking to work but seeking experience in order to realise the greater goal of life. The issue features various designers from India and abroad. Kevin Roodhorst from The Netherlands realised his goal so early in life that propelled him to start his career as a designer as young as 13. To name a few talents we have Vivek Nag from Fine Arts from Rachna Sansad Mumbai, Simran Nanda from Pearl Academy New Delhi, Anisha Raj from MAEER MIT Institute of Design Pune, Giby Joseph from Animation and Art School Goa and many more. This issue gives a fresh perspective of talented graduates and their unique approach to design.

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48
Widget Image

 

What happens when a brand like Nirlep, that has been a pioneer in non-stick cookware since 1960, approaches you to revamp its identity after 27 years? Well, they win the first ever Designomics Award for Strategic Brand Identity Programme. They are also able to bring in 50% more revenues. Here’s how Elephant Design did it for them.

Brand Identity

Step 01

The brief was simple. Nirlep has been actively developing products for the modern lifestyle of young couples who look for convenience and style at affordable prices. The objective was to update the brand identity to reflect this new dynamism. Through a series of workshops and interactions with the leadership team at Nirlep, an idea web was articulated to outline what the brand stood for. The sessions helped in understanding and revealing the company’s strengths, product attributes, user requirements and their aspirations.

Brand Identity

Step 02

The design process began with numerous quick pencil sketches to bring ideas to life. These were then discussed internally and whetted based on contemporary appeal, differentiation against competition, building product attributes and highlighting company legacy.

Brand Identity
Brand Identity

Step 03

The shortlisted ideas were then taken forward to the next stage which involved creating digital sketches in black and white to gauge visual balance and relation with typeface. Some ideas developed further into newer interpretations while some were visually enhanced.

Brand Identity

Step 04

The concept that emerged as a winner was the one inspired by a pan-shaped form which also symbolized a leadership badge. Various explorations were tried out at this stage within the selected option. The colour red was retained to portray warmth and passion with which Nirlep products are conceived and created. The old American typewriter font was discarded for a custom designed set of letters, but the ‘all caps’ treatment was retained to reiterate the brand’s
leadership, confidence and trust.

Brand Identity
Brand Identity

Step 05

The new logo was compared to the old one. It is flexible and playful, just like their products. It signals the transformation of Nirlep from a userfriendly cookware brand to a comprehensive Kitchen solutions brand with global standards. The specially developed Logotype, Nulep, enhances the modern character of the identity. And the black badge, red wing, silver rim and logotype, come together to portray leadership, dynamism, sensitivity and stability of the company; everything the brief demanded.

Brand Identity

Step 06

Over the years, Nirlep has created several product brands that have become popular with diverse audience types. It was important that the new brand identity facilitated customization and flexibility for sub-brand extensions while retaining the presence of a strong mother brand.

 

The colorful renditions of the identity stand for innovation to delight young progressive consumers and connect with the sub-brand propositions – Aspa for partnering progress, Selec+ for lifestyle improvements and Acilis for eco-friendly materials and finishes.

Brand Identity

Step 07

Finally, logo variants were created for various printing and size limitations. These included simple gradient, flat colour, black & white and reverse versions.

Brand Identity

Step 08

An Arabic version of the identity was also created for their export business. The typeface was custom made to match its English version.

Brand Identity

Step 09

The new Nirlep identity was showcased through the brand book that detailed the brands journey to fit the lifestyle of young Indian couples.

Brand Identity

Step 10

The new brand identity was made widely visible by launching through various media both outdoor and in-shop.

Brand Identity
Brand Identity

Step 11

The old Nirlep logo was replaced by the new one on every product, completing the journey from paper to metal.

Published in Issue 19

A typography special, made up of not only Indian type designers or designers whose first love is type, but also few very talented international designers who open a totally new playground with sharing their insights and inspirations. This issue has exclusive interviews with Lucky Dubz Trifonas from Netherlands, Indian UI & type designer Sabareesh Ravi and Shiva Nallaperumal, who believes, type designers are the material providers to all the creative professionals. Also, includes a special making of Nirlep rebranding done by Elephant Design and an interaction with the ace product designer Aman Sadana.

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48
Widget Image