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A brand is like a living being, as it grows and evolves in response to the audience and the environment. Rebranding is like the shedding of old skin in lieu of a new, improved and relevant one. Let’s look at 10 successful rebranding case studies.

1. Animal Planet

 

Animal Planet is loved world over for bringing people close to the wonders of the animal kingdom. Their universal message required a universal and fun logo that transcends all platforms. Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv recreated a new mark for Animal Planet that embodies joy and is universal.

Logo
Logo

The detailed Rebranding Case Study here

 


2. Easyday Club 

 

Rebranding a well-established company, giving it new additional values and sustaining it of its exceptional worth in the eyes of its customers is not an easy task! Elephant Design has successfully achieved this in its encounter with Easyday of the Future Group.

Rebranding
Rebranding

The complete Case study is here.

 


3. Evernote 

Sometimes reworking on just a few elements of the already existing package of multiple things and leaving the rest as they are proves to be successful. DesignStudio used a similar theory to rebrand Evernote as a brand.

Evernote

More on Case study here.

 



4. Mailchimp 

 

Mailchimp, a successful marketing company, announced a rebranding that stands out while staying true to the essence of the company.

Rebranding
Rebranding

Detailed Case study

 


5. Ogilvy 

While we know that change is an integral part of life, David Ogilvy strived to make his company, “Ogilvy”, better and prepared for the future, by seeking certain changes. COLLINS, a brand design company, stepped in and created perfect strategies for Ogilvy in the form of rebranding, and also for its fundamental work environment.

Rebranding
Rebranding

A complete Case study is here.

 


6. The Ruby Mills

Polishing century-old successful brand values to be in possession of a fresh and refined visual identity for ones’ clients and competitors is a must-do these days. ‘The Ruby Mills Ltd’ aka ‘Ruby’, rebranded in collaboration with Elephant Design, is a perfect example to follow.
Ruby Mills Magazine - Creativegaga

A detailed Case study here.

 


7. Slate

Slate, an online editorial, partnered with Gretel, a New York-based design studio to redesign the way they work and build much more than just a new look.

Rebranding

More details on Case study

 



8. Tumblr

A typeface is not just the namesake of a brand. It instead reveals the brand’s story, indicating its nature and rendering it tangible for its users. Tumblr is one such illustration, illustrated by Dinamo.

Typeface
Typeface

Find a detailed Case study here.

 


9. Uber

In a want to make the UI and the internal functionality of the brand as easy as the services the brand provides to its users through its app, Uber teamed up with Wolff Olins to create their dream brand system through rebranding process.

More Details on Case study

 


10. Dunkin

 

Dunkin’ is a now single as ‘donuts’ has officially been dropped off from its previous name. Nevertheless, the team of Jones Knowles Ritchie put their creative caps on and worked hard towards transforming the brand in such a way that the exclusivity remains pristine.

Dunkin
Dunkin

The complete Case study is here.

Related Rebranding Case Studies Articles:

• Interesting Rebranding Case Studies
• What is the Right Time for Rebranding?

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Caricature artist Paul Moyse talks about the secret behind captivating caricatures and his journey to becoming a successful artist.

Caricature
Mr. Beans

Paul Moyse, a successful artist who specializes in fine art caricatures, has an inimitable style to his art. Through his unmatched skill with his brush, he creates realistic caricatures that perfectly capture the spirit of the emotion.

Caricature
Daniel Craig

Paul always knew as a kid in the 1970’s that he would grow up to be a professional artist. It was only a matter of time for this dream to be realized, though the path wasn’t easy. In the 1980’s he became fascinated with the art of caricatures. He spent his teens emulating the caricature from the British show ‘Spitting Image’ and the cartoons of Kevin ‘KAL’ Kallaugher in the Economist.

Caricature
Einstein by Paul Moyse

But in his later years, Paul had to work several jobs to pay bills, all the while developing his skill on the side. In 2006 he finally got his break with his first magazine commission for Radio Times. And since then there has been no looking back.

Caricature
Group of Game of Thrones Sketches

His body of work includes commissions by Weekly Standard, live caricatures for Sir Paul McCartney, and paintings for several eminent private clients. A big highlight that catapulted his career forward was meeting Derren Brown, a renowned mentalist and illusionist, and painting him for the BP awards in 2012. Another memorable moment was getting a commission from Tim Jenison, the film producer, with Penn and Teller, the American magicians and entertainers.

Caricature
John Lydon by Paul Moyse

When asked, what is so captivating about caricatures, Paul said, “I think caricature taps into the part of the brain that recognizes features from memory, the part that allows us to separate one face from another in an instant, but it does so in an exaggerated way for humourous effect.”

Caricature
Neil Patrick

Paul believes observation and empathy are the most important tools required to capture the right expression. Being able to understand what is going on behind the eyes is essential to recreating it.

 

Given a choice, he prefers traditional mediums of painting over digital ones. This is because of the end result being a physical product; also the knowledge that it cannot be deleted or easily reproduced with the click of a button.

Caricature
Pope Francis by Paul Moyse

In retrospect, the journey to be an established artist wasn’t easy. For Paul, the hardest lesson was treating art as a serious profession. And the path of getting paid was filled with ups and downs. But through perseverance, stubbornness, and plenty of practice, success did come his way. Paul also attributes his success to luck, timing, and consistently ignoring the people who said it can’t be done.

Caricature
Tomhanks
Issue 44 - Creative Gaga

Published in Issue 44

Behind every successful studio, artist or designer there are stories of challenges, struggles and their unique solutions to these. With this issue, we interviewed many well-known names from the creative industry and found their different learnings and experiences behind making their own self as a brand. Though they all have a different take on this topic, still they all unanimously emphasise on focusing on their skills and quality delivery of the final outcome. So, if you are looking to establish yourself as a brand in the creative market or already in the process of it, this issue is a must read. Full of insights and inspirations from the best of the talents, this issue is waiting to reach your desks.

 

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Dunkin’ is a now single as ‘donuts’ has officially been dropped off from its previous name. Nevertheless, the team of Jones Knowles Ritchie put their creative caps on and worked hard towards transforming the brand in such a way that the exclusivity remains pristine.

Dunkin

Brief/ Challenge:

A company that is a synonym for providing the best coffees and donuts all over the world, for over 50 years, knocked at the door of Jones Knowles Ritchie for a re-establishment of its brand. While the font and the pink and orange colors make the branding unique, it was a challenge for the team to revamp the brand in a way that the distinctiveness remains intact.

Dunkin
Dunkin

Solution:

Along with tweaking the overall look of the brand, the company even dropped ‘donuts’ from its name and switched it to just “Dunkin”. Just like coffee is associated with donuts, sweet with savory, cream with sugar, Dunkin’ is associated with its signature Frankfurter font and pink and orange colors. Acknowledging the importance of these prime features, the team of Jones Knowles Ritchie struck upon an idea to update the font itself.

Dunkin
Dunkin

They developed a custom update of Frankfurter called Dunkin Sans by adding a serif inspired by Dunkin’s use of Souvenir in the 1970’s. A combination of this newly customized typography and the old colors resulted into a new presentation of the brand by giving a modern twist to the former logo. While the team wondered as to why Dunkin’ even required that bit of jolt, they were quite successful in creating something that captured the nostalgia of the brand which lies in the hearts of millions of Dunkin’s loyal fans.

Dunkin

“America runs on Dunkin” turned out to be amazingly true when over one billion impressions in the first 24 hours of the release of the amplified brand, helped Dunkin’ become a US trending topic on Twitter. Jones Knowles Ritchie was a major source that assisted Dunkin’ to get on “First Name Terms with America”  which also resulted in immense coverage that included The Late Show with Stephen Colbert on CBS, The New York Times, Esquire, The Guardian, Buzzfeed, Forbes and more.

Dunkin
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Slate, an online editorial, partnered with Gretel, a New York based design studio to redesign the way they work and buildmuch more than just a new look.

Rebranding

Brief

Launched in 1996, Slate is a general-interest online magazine offering analysis and commentary about politics, news, business, technology, and culture. It has also published podcasts since the beginning of that medium and now hosts more than fifteen different ones.

 

According to Slate’s Design Director, Jason Santa Maria, it was clear on the first appraisal that Slate had fallen into disrepair over the years, lacked a cohesive visual voice and was in dire need of a re-design/ rebranding. There was an absence of ‘Slateyness’, a term understood only by the internal team at Slate and this needed to be expressed visually, to the viewers, in a way that lived up to the tone and quality of the journalism.

Rebranding

The challenge wasn’t about just rebranding or re-designing the website. Slate wanted to re-design the way they worked, they wanted to build a process for working together that brought everyone to the same table-editorial, design, development, product and sales.

 

For a solution, Slate’s in-house design group collaborated with the New-York based design studio, Gretel and introduced a new identity and an online presence.

Rebranding

Solution

Slate defines itself as an editorial that is reliable and filled with wit and curiosity. Wanting to use these cues in their visual expression, they have adopted a variety of styles infused cohesively.

 

Gretel helped Slate establish a unified conceptual approach to their design work, in addition to all the needed artifacts like logos, colour, type palettes and a design tool-kit.

Rebranding
Rebranding

The Multi-faceted Existence 

Slate exists in various places like their website, on social platform, as a podcast app and also at public spaces hosting live events.

 

The redesign process started from a small but an important part, a corner of their online journal. They rolled-out of a new article design unlike a typical Slate story. It had an airy layout that gave clarity to the text, with new typefaces and colours, and it was published entirely outside of their CMS.

Rebranding
Rebranding

The Re-thought Features 

The rebranding/ re-design was based on the idea of layering and revealing, a visual strategy applied to the identity and website.

Rebranding
Rebranding

Logo 

The new logo was designed as a bold, uppercase wordmark with the distinguishing mark of a cut-off “A”, a nod to the idea of discovery. This gesture of revealing and uncovering expands to the language of the family of Slate products.

Rebranding
Rebranding

Article-Layout 

A technique of layered ‘slates’ was devised bring structure to article layouts and reveal the story for the viewer as they scroll the page. Their visual research led to the creation of layers such as noise, microfiche, zoom-ins and handwritten scribbles.

Rebranding
Rebranding

Illustrations 

To inject the wit and whimsy that’s so true to the voice, a photo-illustration style was created to replace stock photography and instantly bring ‘slateyness’ to an article.

Rebranding

Typography 

New typographic styles were introduced that sought to represent different textures of news and piles of press clippings with fonts that could be both illustrative and functional assets. This was achieved by paring a Serif, Register, for headlines and a Sans-serif, Retina, for body text.

Rebranding
Rebranding
Rebranding

Colour Palette 

The only thing retained from the old Slate was the tone-of-voice and the maroon colour with a sight tweak. An additional palette of bright colours served as an aid to navigating sections.

Rebranding
Rebranding
Rebranding

Conclusion 

The redesigned slate features elements that overlap and pile on top of one another, the editors’ hand scribbles emphasizing a point or creating marginalia and a stylised illustration method.

 

Slate’s story-making process was visualized with a language that feels like sifting through the news, looking for hidden clues and cracking the code that blows open the case, thus providing the viewers with the missing‘slateyness’.

Rebranding
Rebranding
Rebranding

Client: Slate
Agency: Gretel Design Studio
Solution/Expertise: Rebranding

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Starting from scratch isn’t that big a deal. Putting in your hundred percent, grabbing the right opportunities and administering patience go a long way in the evolutionary development of an idea. Gopika Chowfla shares her insight about the same.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Gopika Chowfla Design
Brand Identity for Veeba

After her graduation, choosing to work between 2 design studios and an ad agency to practice her learnings, Gopika joined the ad industry to do what she loved- illustration, logos, typography, poster making, packaging design and photography, and was mentored by amazing creative people at work like Frank Simoes and Mohammed Khan.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Gopika Chowfla Design
Logo and Packaging Design for Organica

The Genesis

In 1996 when the market was changing, print media took a back seat and film was reigning supreme. Being driven by the desire to be innovative and creative, she was not inspired by what she was doing and wanted to get into the realm of design. This gave birth to Gopika Chowfla Design.   Gopika Chowfla Design has evolved organically without much of a business plan or charting of a growth curve. The two driving forces for Gopika were enjoying the work she does and working with people who have the same motivation.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Packaging Design for Chelsea Teas

The Work-Culture 

A studio with the approach of making the clients’ job as own and this has helped establish long-term relationships with clients. Believing in a work ethic that is cooperative and in creating an environment that enables people to work and create in an engaging and supportive way, Gopika has always treated the workspace as a place of learning design as well as life skills.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Gopika Chowfla Design
Brand Identity for Spicejet Airlines

Her workspace is her life with her own children growing up around here and her colleague’s kids as well. Here, personal issues become shared events and everyone is welcome to bring their lives into this work space.   Gopika is proud of having created a space that has welcomed and nurtured as well as been enriched by some of the most talented and wonderful people. The result of this is evident in the output of the studio and the fact that people who have worked here never really leave.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Gopika Chowfla Design
Brand Identity for Spicejet Airlines

Growth and Expansion 

Gopika Chowfla Design was started as a dominantly print design studio but soon branding was their core strength. Getting into the digital space became essential and started extending their design services to web interfaces, primarily as an integral part of developing the total brand architecture as they like to approach brand development in as holistic a manner that they can.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Gopika Chowfla Design
Brand graphics and complete retail experience for Oxford Bookstore and Cha bar

Finding something exciting that challenges creatively, works as a starting point and is then executed in a manner that is fresh, logically thought out and beautifully designed.   When Gopika Chowfla Design was setup, clients typically engaged their advertising agencies for their brand and design-related jobs and these were done at very low fees by the agencies. So convincing a client to actually pay a proper fee to an independent design studio came with its own challenges. But soon enough a client recognized the value of engaging a designer for design specific projects as they got better, more specialized inputs. Seek clients who respect your work and give room to do what you do well.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Coaster design for Apsara

A Positive Outlook

Taking the challenges in a positive light as something new to tackle, it has never been a struggle to move forward. It rather is an enjoyable journey with plenty of interesting co-travelers and many important milestones.   With a young and agile team, we try and keep pace with changes that happen around us and respond accordingly. With social media being such an important part of communication and marketing, are into that area too.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Anya Hotels branding and design

Hidden Treasures

Loving what we do and letting the designers at Gopika Chowfla Design take charge of the assignments they are working on is Gopika Chowfla Design’s secret to achieve everything that they wish for. Making tow of her designers as partners. Gopika wishes to transform it into a cooperative where everyone is an owner, contributes to the earnings and takes a share of the profits.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Gopika Chowfla Design
Anya Hotels branding and design

Clients respect your work only if you respect it yourself. Figure out what you want your brand to stand for, be true to it. Don’t chase the money, go after the ideas and do great work and the money chases you! Surround yourself with talent and feed off it, so that it keeps you going when you feel like you’re drying up. Enjoy yourself, there couldn’t be a more fun job in the world – than as a designer.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Gopika Chowfla Design
Brand development for Apeejay Arts
Issue 44 - Creative Gaga

Published in Issue 44

Behind every successful studio, artist or designer there are stories of challenges, struggles and their unique solutions to these. With this issue, we interviewed many well-known names from the creative industry and found their different learnings and experiences behind making their own self as a brand. Though they all have a different take on this topic, still they all unanimously emphasise on focusing on their skills and quality delivery of the final outcome. So, if you are looking to establish yourself as a brand in the creative market or already in the process of it, this issue is a must read. Full of insights and inspirations from the best of the talents, this issue is waiting to reach your desks.

Order Your Copy!

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While we know that change is an integral part of life, David Ogilvy strived to make his company, “Ogilvy”, better and prepared for the future, by seeking certain changes. COLLINS, a brand design company, stepped in and created perfect strategies for Ogilvy in the form of rebranding, and also for its fundamental work environment.

Rebranding

Brief/ Challenge: 

The world is rapidly propelling towards change, with an influx of new technologies, machine intelligence, prominent channels, and empowered consumers. Realizing the need for a creative shift in his advertising company, “Ogilvy”, Mr. David Ogilvy asserted that “Change is their lifeblood.”

Rebranding
Rebranding

Since even the advertising industry is growing and transforming swiftly, COLLINS took up the challenge of developing a new, future-facing version of Ogilvy. By putting their artistic ideas into action, COLLINS initiated a transformation and created a fresh way of working and a brand new vision for the future of the company.

Rebranding
Rebranding

While Ogilvy was already in a process of streamlining the company, COLLINS decided to provide its own spin to Ogilvy’s old style and design an innovative rebranding for their future. Coincidently, both the companies shared a relationship prior to working on this project, which strengthened their association.

Rebranding
Rebranding

Solution: 

While Ogilvy has a creative network of offices around the globe, they realized that change is inevitable to meet the prerequisites of the future ahead. To bring a shift in the company, they removed internal divisions and obstructions so as to provide a clear path for adopting new measures.

Rebranding
Rebranding

COLLINS developed an interesting strategy of removing all barriers and making the objectives of the employees to unite as a single workforce for the company. Regardless of the individual’s particular skill set, they would perform in order to increase the overall creativity and productivity of the company.

Rebranding
Rebranding

The uniqueness of a company comes through its visual appeal and the overall vibe it emits. The previous logo of Ogilvy had a connection to its history, which COLLINS revamped and presented as new in the form of rebranding. As their strategy depicts, they modified the new logo from David Ogilvy’s signature, which was his trademark, to Baskerville, which represented the mark of many people.

Rebranding

Adapting this approach in their new set of developments, they chose two custom typefaces – an updated Baskerville and a modern sans serif for their logos and other readable modules. This improved the legibility in both fronts – digital and analog. Along with these considerable changes, a dynamic colour palette created a noteworthy impact of all Ogilvy materials, while an update in the linguistic standard brought about accurate developments in the company’s voice.

Rebranding
Rebranding

David Ogilvy vouched for change and made his company thrive higher with the inputs that COLLINS provided. A perfect blend of the past with the present and also its future aspirations, gave Ogilvy a transformation in all aspects and prepare itself for their further growth as a creative and advertising company.

Rebranding

Client: Ogilvy
Agency: COLLINS


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A typeface is not just the namesake of a brand. It instead reveals the brand’s story, indicating its nature and rendering it tangible for its users. Tumblr is one such illustration, illustrated by Dinamo.

Typeface

Brief

Doug Richard, Tumblr’s Creative Director, was on the look-out for a change in their typeface that could work for their app as well as account for all of their brand and product design needs to universalize the brand collateral. The need was for a typeface that would be purely functional for UI, with a flexible personality across brand materials.

Typeface

The requirement was for the kind of a typeface that was neutral enough to represent a diverse mix of communities, individuals and interests, would compliment the logo and also differentiate them from competitor products and brands.

Typeface

Solution

Looking at the typefaces matching the requirement list, Tumblr decided on using the typeface Favorit offered by Dinamo and customising it to their specific needs.

 

Favorit has a friendly yet commanding presence that successfully balances foundational sans serif attributes with assertive, contemporary geometry.

Typeface
Typeface

The Favorit-Tumblr 

Dinamo, a swiss type design agency, in collaboration with Tumblr, worked on Favorit, cut new characters, interpolated new weights, introduced new punctuation and scaled its overall appearance to successfully create Favorit-Tumblr, a 4-weight, 16-style typeface that was functional yet expressive and matching the requirement criteria.

 

The Favorit Tumblr family offers screen optimized weights in both the Standard and Lining versions with corresponding italics ensuring flawless legibility.

Typeface
Typeface

The Favorit-Tumblr Lining

The lining weight interacts with the font’s descenders in a playful but methodical fashion, which has been particularly useful across product explorations; allowing to differentiate usernames, hashtags and links from other words.

Typeface
Typeface
Typeface

Favorit-Tumblr’s Lining style contextually merges characters with an integrated underline to create new shapes. By default, it’s ideal for simple text highlighting, while with the “Rock’n’Roll” feature enabled it merges all initial and final word characters with the underline in a more exaggerated way.

 

The Favorit-Tumblr styles feature distinct glyph amendments like: custom cut characters, two sets of circled numbers optimized for in-app use, in-line logos, expressive alternative quotation marks and redesigned ligatures.

Typeface
Typeface
Typeface
Typeface

The Tumblr Logo

For the logo, the “t” and “r” characters were re-cut to stylistically align with defining attributes of the custom typeface. Other letters received more subtle updates; cleaning up overly nuanced attributes and bringing a more architectural feel to the mark.

 

Optimizations such as the elimination of curved intersections, helped to optimize the logo for small screens without losing its essence. A strategical step to remove the logo’s period allowed the logo and typeface to seamlessly integrate across all naming conventions.

Typeface
Typeface
Typeface
Typeface

Conclusion 

Tumblr began quietly implementing first cuts of the font in June of 2017, while its evolution was still in process over the following year, allowing it to mature alongside their visual language.

 

In June of 2018, Tumblr rolled out the new logo, soon to be followed by the full-scale implementation of Favorit-Tumblr across all their web and app products.

Typeface
Typeface

Client: Tumblr
Agency: Dinamo
Creative Director: Doug Richard
Art Directors: Erik Blad, Alessandra Bautista
Designer: Julianne Waber
Typeface Design: Johannes Breyer, Fabian Harb, Robert Janes
Mastering: Chi-Long Trieu


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Started by Hardik Gandhi, a graduate in Interior Architecture and a post graduate from NID, Ahmedabad, Design Gandhi is a multi-disciplinary design studio with a modern and futuristic approach.


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The first interactive issue of Creative Gaga with Augmented Reality features. This issue focuses on the transition of Advertising from real to virtual and blurring the boundaries of both at the same time. Also bundled with lots of interesting articles and interviews.

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Mailchimp, a successful marketing company, announced a rebranding that stands out while staying true to the essence of the company.

Rebranding
Rebranding
Rebranding

Brief/ Challenge: 

The marketing company, Mailchimp has grown exponentially over the past 17 years of their existence. After all the success they wanted a complete rebranding that caught everyone’s attention and stayed true to their identity.

Rebranding
Rebranding
Rebranding
Rebranding

Solution: 

When young companies grow over years and succeed, they tend to go for a rebranding that reflects their new found maturity and expertise in the field. The general trend is to shed their old skin of unpolished branding, to embrace a more sophisticated, cutting edge appearance.

Rebranding
Rebranding
Rebranding

Collins, a New-York based strategy and design company, did the exact opposite with the rebranding for Mailchimp, and that’s what makes it interesting. Instead of reflecting the 17 years of success and experience the company has seen, the rebranding demonstrates a child-like personality, with rough and sketchy illustrations and a 1920’s typeface. Even Freddie, the logo-cum-mascot was slightly modified but retained. The overall feel of the branding is something of a kindergarten scrapbook, but in doing so the brand comes across as friendly. The rebranding dispels the unapproachable vibe that we generally see with technology companies. Only time can tell if this strategy will work. But it is definitely a bold and unique approach.

Rebranding
Rebranding
Rebranding

Client: Mailchimp
Design Studio: Collins
Solution/Expertise: Branding Strategy, Communication Design


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The illustrator Ruchi Shah reflects on how illustration changes or retains form as it travels from one medium to another.

Illustration
Cover for the children’s book Grimms Fairy Tales.
Illustration
The making of the cover for the children’s book Grimms Fairy Tales.

While the Canvas becomes the message, Illustration becomes the medium

The job of a canvas is to effectively communicate the purpose of illustration. At the same time, illustration is a fitting medium that communicates the purpose of design. Together, they allow a designer to look at things from unlikely angles, allowing one to economise resources and break distinctions. This makes illustration a hybrid of different disciplines like art, craft, architecture and photography. Thus, narrating pictorial stories of the constantly evolving world.

Illustration
Front and back cover for the children’s book Grimms Fairy Tales.

Stories happen through Connections

Whether literal, physical or humorous, it is the connection that makes the style complement the idea. Space-agnostic illustrations are more skill-driven than conceptually steered. Thereby making the style of illustration following the idea. In such cases, the key is to know what can and what can’t be achieved through your form. The possibilities and limitations often declare the idea. Once you know your style well, it becomes easy to explore your idea further.

Illustration
The world through my window. Poster for an annual competition held by Association of Illustrators.

In the artwork, ‘The World through my Window’, the idea is a jumble of what has caught the illustrator’s fancy while travelling, expressed through a pop-art-ish route. The messy, clean and cozy windows that she observed kicked off the visual approach in her mind. The approach took inspiration from her cluttered workspace that is always scattered with curios, boxes, containers and papers. All these objects rearranged themselves to create the visual. With small niches and spaces it worked perfectly as big or small windows and buildings. The artwork is buzzing during the day, but actually comes alive at night. Being created with a mixture of coloured semi-transparent papers, it can be lit up during the night.

Illustration
The Rainmaker. Illustration for a children’s book.

The medium tells you what to do

An illustrator should let the form of illustration take shape according to what the medium allows it to do. This essentially means one needs to know the medium well. Does it bend? Does it fold? Where does it want to go? What does it refuse to do? The answers to these questions determine how one should go about the form, using the chosen medium. Keep exploring, make mistakes, characterise these errors and finally, build on some of them. The enhancement of the imperfections sometimes becomes the key to making a perfect visual.

Illustration
Illustration
Purestone. Entrance graphics for a London based agency.

The brief was to design the entrance of ‘Purestone’ – a London-based digital marketing agency’s office. Part of a rebranding project, it was done in collaboration with Kyle Henderson. The 25ft x 10ft long space, had to be attention grabbing for potential clients, giving the office a strong identity. The style of both the designers on the project had a lot of detailed and bold line work, making it possible for occasional overlapping. Incorporating the window with a view of urban London that sat exactly in between the space, a visual was created that complemented style of both the illustrators on the project. As the space had a lot of geometrical niches and corners, a seamless graphic was preferred to run across it. The style nicely adjusted to the scale of the space and was received enthusiastically by the onlookers.

Illustration
The Rainmaker. Illustration for a children’s book.

Expertise is to know how to give context to everything

Of course, knowledge and skill remain irreplaceable. But expertise also comes with awareness that anything and everything can be used to express yourself. Either by essence or by form, if materials are captured and framed with singular or multiple contexts, brilliant results can be achieved. Turning snags into starting points for constructing the visual and keeping a balance between pausing and exaggeration define it. Unlearning trumps learning and knowledge of that facilitates expertise.

Illustration
The making of the Umbrella, the Rainmaker.

For the project, ‘The Rainmaker’, different skills were combined into one installation, where everything remained substituted. The fabric turned into rain, plastic pipes poured out paper puddles and real people became mere props. The idea was a transition between a sense of reality to conceptual and stylized depictions. The archetypal British summer was the inspiration behind creating the visual around rain, which the designer literally attempted to ‘make’. This was justified with a screen-printed fabric on which it was raining cats, dogs, fish, alligators etc., giant paper-cut ‘water’ and an intricately hand crafted umbrella, creating an image of the urban world above it, using mundane materials such as black strings and wires and things found in everyday life. This carefully arranged scene was a full-blown installation, letting people take the centre stage.

Illustration
The making of the Umbrella, the Rainmaker.

Sum up to your talent everyday, every moment

Learning and exploring are the two essential ways by which you can keep moving forward. Achieve that through travelling, developing new habits, observing anything and everything, miscellaneous conversations, following the trends in nature and the haphazardness of our responses to those trends. A culmination of all of these will be exemplified in your work.

Illustration
Umbrella for the Rainmaker Illustration.

Published in Issue 13

Coming from a country of stories and storytellers, Indian animation professionals are sitting on a gold reserve. Yet, we are miles behind the Western world. We spoke to few leading names to find out the reason and understand the Indian animator’s sensibilities and practices The house unanimously opined that we need to develop more original ideas and also create exclusive stories for animation, rather than going the other way round…

 

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