1

High thought about the future is inseparable from the mind of a man. It’s the dreams that define his character. And hence, holds an important place in shaping up his expectations. Rupinder Singh attempts to interpret this relationship between a man and his expectations in a surrealist manner through his poster, Live your Dream.

Step 1

Started sketching in Illustrator. It’s best for drawing geometric shapes. Took reference from a few crystal images to understand basic shape, texture and angles of a crystal.

Step 2

Created random collage of cloud images in Photoshop. Imported the Illustrator file (crystal outline file) into this Photoshop document. Cut a cloud image into fragments with a layer mask and the Magic Wand tool (W). Used the line work/outline layer to make the selection and hide the part of the image that needs to go.

Step 3

Repeated the previous steps to get an overall image similar to this. After all the areas were filled, merged all those layers to lower the file size. Left it for a while and created a new file in Photoshop for background design.

Step 4

Created the background using few high-resolution stock images such as, green field, an old man and few clouds that gave a dramatic look to the sky.

Step 5

Arranged all those stock images in different layers and made them black and white. Deleted the extra sky on the field image using a very soft brush and replaced it with the more dramatic and textured sky.

Step 6

Imported that giant crystal and adjusted its highlights and shadows using Image>Adjustments>Curves. The design was almost done. Added some details like lights, shadows and textures.

Step 7

Made two copies of the crystal and placed them on two different sides. Added some Gaussian blur to make them look out of focus. This would create depth in the design. Also created shadows wherever required.

Step 8

Added reflection and shine using white coloured normal round brush with 0% hardness and 100% opacity.

Step 9

Created light strokes of around 50% opacity and placed them wherever required. This added details and depth to the design.

Step 10

Created one curves adjustment layer and adjusted highlights and shadows.

Step 11

Created a new layer just below the light and shine layers and added the above texture to it. Scaled it to fit the canvas and changed its layer property to ‘Soft Light’. Got that vibrant coloured texture.

Step 12

Created a new layer and filled it with blue colour. Changed its layer property to ‘Exclusion’. This gave a cold temperature to the image.

Step 13

Added text on the top. Final image

Published in Issue 09

This issue focuses on strengths and weakness of Indian creative business with cover from Archan Nair. Also, include some of the fearless creatives who had made their mark in the industry without compromising on the quality of the output and many more interesting reads.

 

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Every one of us responds to emotions in our own personal ways. But for all of us, it is an explosion. Sometimes it is expressed through an outburst, at other times, it just submerges within. Every time we explode, we lose a little bit of us. Digital Artist Fahd Hussein captures a moment in that explosion to create his piece, ‘Extraho’.

Step 1

Found a collection of stock textures on the net that would be the building blocks for the image. Found a wall texture and smoke/ ink in water shot.

Step 2

Dug out stock images of a broken egg shell and a jelly fish. These would be part of the visual elements to be used.

Step 3

Picked out an expressive face from T-gar’s stock collection on deviantart.com to create the ‘protagonist’ of the piece. Arranged the model’s face on top of the texture and erased out enough to force a seamless blend. Colour-toning the image helped in setting the mood. The green was chosen to give it a little ‘creep’ factor.

Step 4

Time to explode the face. Chopped off the eggshell and placed it to fit the contours of the face.

Step 5

Added some shading and colour to get the depth. Air-brushing helped to get the desired effect.

Step 6

Blended in some cracked earth/ peeling paint textures for stress marks where the face exploded.

Step 7

Took the smoke/ ink pic and masked it out to get the ‘hot smoke’ feel. Blended it in Screen mode to get the desired effect.

Step 8

Took a couple of the jellyfish pics, inverted, huerotated and curve-adjusted the jelly out of them till they looked adequately ominous.

Step 9

Took another one of T-Gar’s lovely face shots and placed them in line with the flow of the jellyfish body.

Step 10

Masked out the extra bits and did the usual blend-mode/ colour correction routine till it started looking natural.

Step 11

Did this for multiple jellyfish till a swarm was created.

Step 12

Placed it all together. The finished piece started taking shape a little.

Step 13

Added appropriate shading to get depth. Some ink-splats and similar textures were added to enhance the ‘creep’ factor. A liquid spurt on the head, some spot colour and final colour-toning signed it off.

Step 14

Got the final image.

Published in Issue 11

This issue also explored the Jewellery Design & Wedding Photography with some cool techniques to learn from experts in Gyaan section.

 

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Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

Fashion photography blends commercial photography and fine arts. After you understand the communication objective, it is important to understand the role of different elements as well to fix the final frame. Fashion Photographer Omkar Chitnis shares few techniques and insights that help in getting a visually dynamic fashion frame.

Choosing the Subject

The process starts with the subject. It can be a model, a product, a service, anything. The other elements should be used to support it. Magnification of the shot comes next. For example, if you are shooting for a clothing brand, you need to take a full-length shot. If you are shooting for makeup, you have to take a close-up shot. The background is a very important aspect of any picture. It enables you to complete the image.

Fashion Photography

Planning the Frame

Unlike Landscape photography, in fashion, you design a shot and accordingly go about models, magnification, poses, lighting, etc. The kind of lights, the distance at which they are placed, the shutter speed, the aperture etc. everything makes for the final frame. Keep in mind two key factors, the amount of light and the expected temperature of the image. Also, in the post-production, temperature and tones of the picture should be adjusted accordingly to justify the picture.

Choosing the Tone

There’s a vast difference in lighting for colour and black&white images. While shooting in colour, tone and intensity of colours matter whereas in black&white, grayscale of the colours matter. Some tones may look interesting in colour but flat in black&white. So, as a photographer, understanding the grayscale of every colour is important. Thus, clothes, accessories, background and even the hair colour of the model matters in a black&white shoot. Capturing a frame in colour and then making it a black&white is a wrong technique

Setting the Context

Expression and attitude of the model is really important to make an impact. But since fashion photography is also about clothing, you need to ensure clothes are not getting blurred or losing the colours, details etc. Make up and model should compliment the clothes, the subject of the shoot. Keeping the lighting soft gives soft results, retaining the softness of the skin and expressions.

Creating the Mood

Sometimes, shooting in low shutter speed helps you create depth and mood, being helped by a little-blurred hair. Shooting men is different from shooting women. One should decide the look of the model – sexy, confident, soft or blunt. Lighting comes to play here. Generally, a bit of contrast works in men’s shoot to enhance the sharp features. It’s important to understand the anatomy, nature and character of the personality. When features are a bit blunt, bright lighting helps you enhance the features and hide the flaws. Similarly, high contrast lighting creates drama.

Shooting in the Open

Outdoor photography is a different task altogether. If you are using only sunlight, you will have to be very precise about the time, the angle of the light and the location. A study of the light source helps you a lot. Sometimes you can use sunlight as a key light and use flashlights or continuous lights to fill the excess shadows or vice verse. When you shoot in just sunlight, background matters a lot. Remember to not let it overpower the model at all. If need be, light up the natural background as well.

Adding the Elements

Many a times, the fabric on the model creates drama. Keeping the overall image dark makes it more interesting. And a blurred background creates a nice depth. Using backlight can create a nice dimension. Having a bit blurry foreground creates mood in the picture.

Presenting it Perfect

After selecting the final shot, colour correction is a very important step. Just a tinge of colour helps you create a different mood altogether. Cropping the picture is also an important part. While shooting you should know what to shoot, but you should also know what should be kept and done away with while editing.

Published in Issue 10

With this issue, we are exploring yet another discipline of design – Web and UI. With the changing times, Indian designers are increasingly opting for this new medium. But are we really prepared to take the global challenge? What’s missing and what do we strive on? We invited few leading practitioners of the industry to deliberate on this issue. So, go ahead

 

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The world is a beautiful and balanced composition of humans and animals where currently an imbalance has been created between the two. Rohan Dahotre has translated his love for animals into illustrations in an attempt to create awareness and restore this balance.

An unhindered interest to watch animal documentaries and amazed by the behaviour of animals, Rohan names Nature as his biggest inspiration in life and accredits it for where he stands today in his professional career of being an illustrator, specifically illustrating animals.

An animal lover by nature, Rohan studies and observes animals in terms of their form, characteristics, behaviour, colour, patterns, texture and habitat. With an aim to make people aware about the existence of these creatures and the beauty that lies within them, he took to drawing animal portraits.

Inspired by tribal art in general and African doodles lately, Rohan began experimenting with doodles of tribal patterns on photographs of animals in the wild. An extremely positive response to his first doodled-Rhino on social media motivated him to the extent that he created an entire series based on tribal art doodle on animals.

Living for Animals!

Describing himself as a versatile artist, Rohan tries out different kinds of styles. He is of the opinion that using the tools of pen and ink help him in strengthening the foundations of his of artworks and keeping his basics in place.

 

The excellency of his skills earned him an opportunity to doodle for Google and work with WWF, the World Wildlife Fund.

Full of an undying love and an undiminished devotion towards the protection for animals, he loves working on projects involving nature and animal conservation. Rohan is presently working on a few personal illustrations on the endangered species while also illustrating for children’s books.

Challenge Yourself, Go Beyond!

Not such a big fan of type art, he still took up the challenge of ’36 days of type’ only for his love towards animals and came up with a series called “Owlfabets”, owls in alphabets, drawing owls, keeping the style clean and minimal and yet not losing the identity.

 

Rohan recommends the budding artists to carry a sketchbook everywhere they go as inspiration can be found in the bizarrest of the places and then comes the need to have a place to pour that thought onto.

The future is full of endless possibilities. Create your own.

Issue 44 - Creative Gaga

Published in Issue 44

Who doesn’t want to become famous, when everyone knows your name and especially for us designer, it is the basic dream every design student or young artist dream. But behind every successful studio, artist or designer there are stories of challenges, struggles and their unique solutions to these. With this issue, we interviewed many well-known names from the creative industry and found their different learnings and experiences behind making their own self as a brand. Though they all have a different take on this topic, still they all unanimously emphasise on focusing on their skills and quality delivery of the final outcome. So, if you are looking to establish yourself as a brand in the creative market or already in the process of it, this issue is a must read. Full of insights and inspirations from the best of the talents, this issue is waiting to reach your desks.

 

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Charuvi Agarwal

Founded Charuvi Design Labs in 2009, a leading animation studio and design lab based in New Delhi. Plunging deep into animations, interactive and innovative media installations, applications and games. CDL’s spirit of transforming challenges into opportunities has helped them achieve numerous prestigious awards at various festivals.


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Who doesn’t want to become famous, when everyone knows your name and especially for us designer, it is the basic dream every design student or young artist dream. But behind every successful studio, artist or designer there are stories of challenges, struggles and their unique solutions to these. With this issue, we interviewed many well-known names from the creative industry and found their different learnings and experiences behind making their own self as a brand. Though they all have a different take on this topic, still they all unanimously emphasise on focusing on their skills and quality delivery of the final outcome. So, if you are looking to establish yourself as a brand in the creative market or already in the process of it, this issue is a must read. Full of insights and inspirations from the best of the talents, this issue is waiting to reach your desks.
Portfolios ready and design graduate all set to grab their first dream job in the studio and agency they admire. And on the other side, the industry is always on the look for the fresh talent to acquire. The issue is full of advice on, what to expect from your first job, how to be prepared to get the best opportunities and much more. We have also featured some of the exceptionally talented graduates from some of the design colleges and institutes. So if you are a recent graduate or looking to hire fresh talent, this is a must-have for you. So go ahead and order your copy now!

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A mechanical engineer by qualification, artist by passion, and a digital marketer & content writer by profession, Varun Rao is a self-taught artist and has been channelising his energy by drawing since he was a kid. From drawing and modifying his favourite cars and bikes seen on the streets of Mumbai to sketching portraits of celebrities, Varun constantly found sources to feed his creative appetite.


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Who doesn’t want to become famous, when everyone knows your name and especially for us designer, it is the basic dream every design student or young artist dream. But behind every successful studio, artist or designer there are stories of challenges, struggles and their unique solutions to these. With this issue, we interviewed many well-known names from the creative industry and found their different learnings and experiences behind making their own self as a brand. Though they all have a different take on this topic, still they all unanimously emphasise on focusing on their skills and quality delivery of the final outcome. So, if you are looking to establish yourself as a brand in the creative market or already in the process of it, this issue is a must read. Full of insights and inspirations from the best of the talents, this issue is waiting to reach your desks.

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A BFA and MFA from College of Art, New Delhi, he is a full-time artist and a graffiti maker, currently working as the Creative Brand Manager at R K Swamy BBDO. Advertising is his forte but he also creates installations in his own unconventional style. He focuses on quality delivery, makes an extra effort to exceed expectations and loves exploring various genres of creativity.


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Who doesn’t want to become famous, when everyone knows your name and especially for us designer, it is the basic dream every design student or young artist dream. But behind every successful studio, artist or designer there are stories of challenges, struggles and their unique solutions to these. With this issue, we interviewed many well-known names from the creative industry and found their different learnings and experiences behind making their own self as a brand. Though they all have a different take on this topic, still they all unanimously emphasise on focusing on their skills and quality delivery of the final outcome. So, if you are looking to establish yourself as a brand in the creative market or already in the process of it, this issue is a must read. Full of insights and inspirations from the best of the talents, this issue is waiting to reach your desks.

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Paul Moyse is a UK-based artist who is known for his caricatures and portraitures. His work includes paintings for Darren Brown, Sir Paul McCartney, and many more eminent personalities. He has also got commissions from the Weekly Standard and Radio Times. His stubbornness to keep going on this difficult journey has brought him to the doors of success.


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Who doesn’t want to become famous, when everyone knows your name and especially for us designer, it is the basic dream every design student or young artist dream. But behind every successful studio, artist or designer there are stories of challenges, struggles and their unique solutions to these. With this issue, we interviewed many well-known names from the creative industry and found their different learnings and experiences behind making their own self as a brand. Though they all have a different take on this topic, still they all unanimously emphasise on focusing on their skills and quality delivery of the final outcome. So, if you are looking to establish yourself as a brand in the creative market or already in the process of it, this issue is a must read. Full of insights and inspirations from the best of the talents, this issue is waiting to reach your desks.

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From being a simple guy with a passion for drawing to a self-taught professional artist, Danny Jose has gone through a lot of downs in life to reach the up-point at which he is now. Currently working as an illustrator and a storyboard artist for a Bangalore based studio, he does the pre-production work for 3d-animated TV commercials. He has also worked on print ads, books and games while balancing between freelancing and studio work.


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Who doesn’t want to become famous, when everyone knows your name and especially for us designer, it is the basic dream every design student or young artist dream. But behind every successful studio, artist or designer there are stories of challenges, struggles and their unique solutions to these. With this issue, we interviewed many well-known names from the creative industry and found their different learnings and experiences behind making their own self as a brand. Though they all have a different take on this topic, still they all unanimously emphasise on focusing on their skills and quality delivery of the final outcome. So, if you are looking to establish yourself as a brand in the creative market or already in the process of it, this issue is a must read. Full of insights and inspirations from the best of the talents, this issue is waiting to reach your desks.

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Born and brought up in Abu Dhabi, UAE, Alicia has lived, studied and worked in many different cities across various continents. After graduating from Melbourne and having lived there for about 5 years, Alicia moved to Bangalore 8 years back to work as an illustrator and has been drawing for a living ever since!


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Who doesn’t want to become famous, when everyone knows your name and especially for us designer, it is the basic dream every design student or young artist dream. But behind every successful studio, artist or designer there are stories of challenges, struggles and their unique solutions to these. With this issue, we interviewed many well-known names from the creative industry and found their different learnings and experiences behind making their own self as a brand. Though they all have a different take on this topic, still they all unanimously emphasise on focusing on their skills and quality delivery of the final outcome. So, if you are looking to establish yourself as a brand in the creative market or already in the process of it, this issue is a must read. Full of insights and inspirations from the best of the talents, this issue is waiting to reach your desks.

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