1

The beauty of women is pure and refreshing; every man would agree. Spanish illustrator, Gabriel Moreno, is no different. Charmed by the raw beauty and behaviour of the female form, his artworks capture them through graphic and elegant imagery to make a mark in advertising. He talks to us to tell us more.

PREMIUM McWRAP
The Beauty of Women
San Gavino Mural

CG. Your illustrations and designs are very eye-catchy. How would you describe your style as?

Gabriel. I’d say my style is best described as based in the fine arts but with digital platforms in mind. When you grow up drawing, it just develops naturally. In some facets it’s academic and in others it’s personality. When I choose a subject, I envision whether it will go well with this style that I’ve developed, letting the style define itself.

CD Cover
COCA-COLA PACKAGING
FIAT500 CHINA

CG. What came first, the desire to work as an illustrator or as an advertising professional? How did you marry both? What were/are your inspirations?

Gabriel. The desire to be an illustrator was always first. As far as how I married them, when you desire to work as an illustrator I believe it’s like any other marriage. Sometimes you are on a high and sometimes you find the best way to stay together. Most of the time, the profession is completely fulfilling. Some days I’m more motivated to create than others. Therefore, I have my more artistic “hands-on” days and my less “hands-on” artistic days.

CITRUS AND MANDARINE

The inspirations depend on whether the work is commissioned or personal. If the work is commissioned, the inspiration comes from the subject matter provided by the agency and/or client. If the work is personal, the response is much easier.

 

The inspirations come from women. I’ve always watched women and how they move, their beauty, how they interact with the public, how they interact with themselves, and most importantly how to translate that beauty into my own work in a way that enlivens both them and the visions I have of them.

Giraffe
Hare Edition
DONKEY

CG. Spain’s a very cultural and exquisite country. What Spanish elements do you incorporate in your designs, if at all any? How do you tweak your designs and illustrations according to international brands/clients?

Gabriel. Well, I come from Spain. So, in essence, Spanish culture naturally comes out of me in many ways. I suppose I can say that many of the women that I draw are from Andalusia and others have Spanish traits. However, the main elements that I look for are the eyes and mouth.

 

Many women have beautiful features and it’s just as easy for me to be intrigued by women from India, Italy, Greece, etc. I don’t necessarily feel that any of my work portrays “Spanish” characteristics bounded in culture or a particular Spanish method of approaching art.

COVER ILLUSTRATION
EROTIC STORIES BY JUAN JOSÉ MILLÁS

Regarding the international brands and clients, I adapt to the models given to me in order to professionally carry out the commission. There are always tweaks that need to be made to my style to correctly approach the subject matter. However, the style is the style. It deals more with how I want the visual aesthetic to turn out for the commission.

VODKA CRUISER
SOLO EXHIBITION

CG. What advice would you give to budding enthusiasts out there? What are your future goals and dreams that you wish to conquer?

Gabriel. I respond to this question by stating that you have to create a lot of work, and just keep creating. However, upon presenting your work in terms of achieving professional recognition, it’s best to have those 25 works that show who you most are. They must be your best work and transmit what you’ll bring to the art world. I have no dreams of conquering, I just wish to continue working in the illustration field for as long as possible.

Series of illustrations for the brand of shoes called Vögele

Published in Issue 24

Gone are the days when Illustrations would take a back seat. Now, they are becoming more proactive and are evolving the way we communicate. This time, Creative Gaga focuses on how the advertising world is opening its doors to this exciting form of design. Featuring renowned Illustrators like Chris Beatrice, Nasheet Shadani, Vijay Kumar, Gabriel Mareno and much more, this issue promises to leave no page unturned!

 

Order Your Copy!

While creating an illustration, it’s important to carefully choose every element that goes into the work. Every aspect should add to the overarching concept. And this is what we see with the Roudra Bhangi illustration by Ibrahim Rayintakath.

 

Through this illustration, the touching story of a Guru-Shishya relationship is laid in numerous layers of colours, depth, patterns and emotions. The dizzying patterns, bold colours and layered shadows, all work together to draw the viewer deeper into the story.

 

Connect Here

 

Roudra Bhangi
Roudra Bhangi
Roudra Bhangi
Roudra Bhangi
Roudra Bhangi
Roudra Bhangi

Sri Harsha Andukuri

Born in May 1991, Sri Harsha Andukuri studied graphic design from IIT Guwahati. Specializing in UI/UX illustration and digital paintings, this architect graduate from NIT Patna, is also a keen traveler and soccer fan.


Featured In


Creative Gaga kicks off the year with an issue that asks the important questions, is it the web that’s leading the brands or the other way around? With 2014 witnessing an increase in brands investing in digital marketing, 2015 will only be bigger. We can say India has accepted the revolution, where more and more people are opening browsers to e-commerce, literally window shopping, and setting up shops online as well. The issue brings together renowned designers with digital experience, who discuss and throw light on the pros and cons of this change and where we possibly are headed with this in the future.

Related Posts


POST TAGS:

Why do we love illustrations so much? Is it because it gives us a different perspective? Or is it the yearning for something spectacular? Maybe it’s simply to make one stop and think. These 3D installations by Peter Tarka, is all this and more. Each installation in the series takes different principles of design and explores the possibilities. The tension between the various objects in each installation creates something wonderful.

 

Peter Tarka is an art director and illustrator based in London who has worked with several renowned agencies like Saatchi & Saatchi, and for eminent clients like Apple, Honda, etc.

 

Connect Here

 

Anoop V Chalil

A graduate from College of Fine Arts, Thiruvananthapuram, Anoop V Chalil is an independent brand identity specialist and design expert who is dedicated to building brands that define, inspire, support, and transform organisations. Having given form to some of India’s leading brands, he has worked with leading strategic identity firms like Idiom Design & Consulting Ltd. as well as with The Brand Union, Ray+Keshavan.


Featured In


Packaging is the first vital step towards enchanting the audience. Who doesn’t like a cute box or a trendy bottle? With this issue, Creative Gaga lets the cat out of the box to reveal the world of packaging design. Featuring various local and international designers like Petar Pavlov from Macedonia and Brandziac from Russia, Elephant Design and Impprintzfrom Pune, the issue promises to be a keepsake for many.

Related Posts


No posts were found.


Find Him Here


POST TAGS:

Carlos Cadenas is a Venezuelan art director and graphic designer, who is passionate about type and poster design. He has received several prestigious awards for this experimental typography series.

 

Here Carlos explores typography for the ’36 Days of Type’ Challenge. The result of his work brings colours, textures and 3D form so perfectly together that it almost looks too easy! Carlos decided to play with 3D and went all out with his explorations. The abstract concepts depicted for each letter is a very interesting and giving way to see a story inside a story. Through this series, one can see a myriad of ideas, colours, perspectives and so much more.

 

Connect Here

 

36 Days of Type

Creating a character is a difficult task in itself. Recreating a character is an altogether different story. Using traditional and digital techniques, Illustrator Sajid Wajid Shaikh, designs popular characters that resonate with the audience and simultaneously surprise as well with the addition of personal twists to the tale. Here, he takes us through the creation of Hunter S. Thompson.

the famous character of Hunter S. Thompson

Step 1 

Head
Like most great works of art, a raw sketch is made to get a basic idea of how the face should look like.

Step 2 

Once the basic contouring is put in place, this step involves using tools to gradually give the face its features in order to define the character.

Step 3 

After this point, both Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop are used to design perfect shapes to accessorise the character, like a hat, cigarette and smoke. This concludes the top most part of the design.

Step 4 

Body
Next step involves focusing on the lower portion of the body by drawing out the shirt, only partially.

Step 5 

The next step involves taking a hand drawn pattern on Adobe Illustrator for the shirt. This pattern is later wrapped on to the shirt to add effects and texture according to the flow of
the body.

Step 6 

During these steps, the focus is in completing the entire body. Adding characteristic detailing enhances the creation of the character design. The fly swatter is composed in Adobe Illustrator. As a designer, it’s important to make the best of both programs.

Step 7 

And like the shirt, a pattern is created for the shorts.

Step 8 

In the final stages of the composition, typography is added to give a lasting appeal to the artwork. Here, a selfcreated type face called Drifter is employed to blend with the posture of the character. This vague element adds meaning to the design and helps relate it to the viewers.

Published in Issue 26

Packaging is the first vital step towards enchanting the audience. Who doesn’t like a cute box or a trendy bottle? With this issue, Creative Gaga lets the cat out of the box to reveal the world of packaging design. Featuring various local and international designers like Petar Pavlov from Macedonia and Brandziac from Russia, Elephant Design and Impprintz from Pune, the issue promises to be a keepsake for many.

 

Order Your Copy!

Go back to when you were a child. Do you remember noticing something that couldn’t be explained and made your own interpretations and stories? Illustrator Vijyakumar Arumugam works with that strategy. “Breaking down real elements and combining them to create imaginary characters and stories is what’s exciting”, he says. He talks more on his style and how it fits into his real life illustrating profession with imagination.

Real Life Inspires the Imagination
Ganesha
Real Life Inspires the Imagination
MS Dhoni
YAZHI

Imagination is Inspired By Reality

In actual, the imaginary characters are derived from the real ones. So the more one draws and observes from real life, it becomes that much easier to execute the imaginary ones. It’s an amalgamation of animals, birds, reptiles, and characters you know of in the world we live in.

 

You can spread the wings of your imagination, travel wherever you want to, meet the wizards, speak to the fairies, fight with the giant eagles, eat with the deadliest predators of an unknown planet. The best technique to execute a character always is to sketch, doodle and passionately explore what you really want to create. As the wise men say, ‘when you seek for it, it seeks for you!’

RATI
MADANAA.
KAAMDEV

It’s a One Man Story

One character is good enough to tell a story. The pose is in, the emotions on the face, what is it wearing or carrying and its environment. And the composition and all these would bring about a story in everyone’s mind when they look at a character.

 

It is special because perception is subjective and everyone will perceive the same character differently and would also have a different story in their mind.

THE AWAKENING
URSULA
MAHISHASURAMADHINI

Versatility is Attractive

This stands true for a designer and his/her artwork as well. Because commercial work is based mostly on what a client wants, which varies every time, versatility is an attribute a designer should try and possess. And of course, when you’re working for yourself, you can wish to be and achieve anything.

 

It’s important to use your talent and skill, like a fortune-teller who can read a hand, to present to the world what they do not know or have not seen. Being intuitive, mythical and intricate for example are some elements that a designer might work with through his artwork. The goal is to connect with the audience and have them resonate with your thoughts and imagination.

THE ZEN WAY
RAVICHANDRAN ASHWIN

For Every ‘Ying’ There is a ‘Yang’

Most illustrators would claim in having a professional and a personal side. Some might like to create real-life characters whereas some might find their pencil sketching mythological characters. Every artist has an evolutionary arch that is very unique based on his work and life experiences and which ultimately swings the illustrator towards versatility. Though most prefer to work in a particular style, it’s always advisable to keep an open mind to explore other styles.

HILFY.
MS Dhoni

Do Whatever it Takes to Create Good Work

Illustrators should keep building their personal projects and exercise their freedom. Many illustrators are unhappy even after getting much work and adequate money. The reason could be the kind of work that they do actually contradicts the kind of work they want to do.

 

We have to find time for our own personal space and projects. Working for hours day and night might make it tough. In such situations, be straightforward and ask for the time it takes to deliver good quality work. We have to realize that every time we put out a work, we are setting a standard and people are going to be introduced to new aesthetics and it better be a good one.

Amitabh Bachchan
A CELEBRATION

Published in Issue 24

Gone are the days when Illustrations would take a back seat. Now, they are becoming more proactive and are evolving the way we communicate. This time, Creative Gaga focuses on how the advertising world is opening its doors to this exciting form of design. Featuring renowned Illustrators like Chris Beatrice, Nasheet Shadani, Vijay Kumar, Gabriel Mareno and much more, this issue promises to leave no page unturned!

 

Order Your Copy!

Gabriel Moreno

Based in Madrid, Gabriel Moreno is best known for his work in advertising and whose illustrations have been frequently featured in leading publications. A BFA graduate from the Universidad de Sevilla, he has worked with international clients like Coca-Cola, Nike USA, Rolex and Victoria’s Secret in addition to developing his personal line of art.


Featured In


Gone are the days when Illustrations would take a back seat. Now, they are becoming more proactive and are evolving the way we communicate. This time, Creative Gaga focuses on how the advertising world is opening its doors to this exciting form of design. Featuring renowned Illustrators like Chris Beatrice, Nasheet Shadani, Vijay Kumar, Gabriel Mareno and much more, this issue promises to leave no page unturned!

Related Posts



Find Him Here


POST TAGS:

We all look for it. From a product to a person, quality is what stands out. It’s what is most desirable. “Design without quality is like mathematics without the number zero”, believes Creative Director, Avi Sehmi. And its importance multiplies when you’re starting up a design business. Here, he tells us how quality and other factors contribute to calculated growth of your business and you as a designer.

Reemerge - Digital Art Creativegaga
Shivinity - Digital Art Creativegaga

Achieve Quality And You Can Achieve Anything

For a design business, quality work always comes first and foremost followed by networking events and the word of mouth. To hook a new client, the best way to move forward is to sit with your team and whip together a solution based pitch deck, with a simple and consistent follow-up schedule. The rule is to not push too hard or you will push them off.

King Brach Kaiju - Digital Art Creativegaga
Spuddle - Digital Art Creativegaga

Practice Makes A Master

We’re born with talent within us and inspirations around us. These vary from designer to designer. One may wish to portray an abstract world and the other might want to tell a story through accentuated body language and a surreal setting. But the question is, ‘How do you do it?’.

 

Well, learning is a step by step journey. It’s a constant dance of finessing the basics’ the composition, the tone, the quality of light, the story etc. From Wacom & Adobe to Autodesk & Pixologic, digital design software and programs is where the magic lies. Master the magic, and there’s no stopping you.

 

And of course, it’s not just what’s within the measures of your screen but also the giant world around you. Travel. Experience various cultures. Discover different designs and art forms. Whether it’s African tribal art or the Bauhaus of Germany, notice the distinction, notice the similarities.

 

Remember, your mind makes connections that are unique to you and then you get to integrate that understanding and express that in a way that’s true to you. The process is nowhere near complete as it’s a lifelong mission to patiently work away at your craft.

Mechsplorer - Digital Art Creativegaga
Asia Borg - Digital Art Creativegaga

Every Creative Mind Needs To Be A Technology Mind As Well

The design is solution based and with modern day analytics and AB testing, there are ways to measure engagement and success rates. Keeping up to date with the trends in technology and working on the way you see the world around you is not an option, but absolutely necessary. Art is open to opinion and one will always feel that there are better, worse, stranger, even cooler artists out there. In that space its better to see how others are applying the principles and techniques and apply that understanding on improving the expression of your vision. Remember, it’s not a rat race but a lifelong process. Thinking otherwise will end up exhausting you too soon.

Trod - Digital Art Creativegaga
Puppetite - Digital Art Creativegaga

Never Forget To Work For Yourself Too

Over time, you will realize that it’s not all about you and your ideas but rather about facilitating the thinking of the team, making them work cohesively and passionately, to come to the best solution. That is actual growth. With such growth comes pressure and responsibility; not only to handle a team but to also manage a client. To stay in touch with creativity and innovation, always present an alternate route to the client if you believe it adds value to them. That’s another thing that often times, the client will stay bull headed in the pitch meeting. Some may appreciate the extra mile you walked, some may totally disregard the idea. Hence, it’s always beneficial to have an outlet, like digital painting or music. It keeps you sane and creatively active. That’s your space for unleashing ideas and experimenting.

Turtleopolis - Digital Art Creativegaga
Issue-23- Digital Art Creativegaga

Published in Issue 23

The issue explores a topic which is close to every designer, the Business of Design. We try to understand from the experienced ones that when is the right time to open own studio and what more you should get in your toolbox before taking the plunge! We had interactions with many talented studio founders like Rajesh Dahiya, Archan Nair, Ishan Khosla, Prasun Mazumdar and Anupam Tomer. Also featuring some of the best talents around the world such as Martin Grohs from Germany and Avi Sehmi from Canada, this issue not only provide answers to many questions but also initiate many new ones to explore further! We hope you will enjoy exploring the possibility of your studio with this issue.

 

Order Your Copy!

Pin It on Pinterest