1

Sumouli Dutta, a doodle and illustration artist, tries her hand at creating a 2018 calendar of Indian Gods set apart from the all so common representation of the theme across common calendar art found through the country.

Indian Gods
Indian Gods
Indian Gods

Challenge

Inspired by the variety and depth of India’s mythology, Sumouli wanted to create an exclusive 2018 Hindu Avatar calendar based on selective Hindu gods of the millions worshipped in the country. However, the Indian belief that it is auspicious to start a month or each day looking and praying to gods and goddesses meant that Indian Hindu gods were the most commonly used topic to design or illustrate on a calendar. So her main idea and challenge was to create an exclusive calendar distinct from the usual by depicting a series of ‘cute, lively, quirky and bright coloured reusable avatars’ to be conveniently displayed on work desks, study tables or shelves.

Indian Gods
Indian Gods
Indian Gods

Solution

Since the idea was to give a new look, feel and use altogether, this intention made her work a little more hard to break the stereotypical form of illustration and do it differently. The journey of learning and reading mythological stories before sketching was thus very insightful. She then searched and scribbled ideas and facts of each of the avatars she found to be interesting from the context of what she wished to create, hence trying to bring cute elements through facial expressions, colours and the Vahanas (vehicles). The illustrative process was mainly carried out using software such as Procreate and Autodesk Sketchbook on an iPad and laptop. Further, instead of making a normal desk calendar, she made a series of postcards that could be reused once the month got over i.e. the calendar’s dates could be cut off and the illustrated avatar could be framed and hung on the wall or displayed in other ways suitable to the user – probably offered even as a gift. She used binder clips to make a stand, hence giving it a unique look.

Indian Gods
Indian Gods
Indian Gods

The Result

The result was a fun, unique, vibrant and playful 2018 Hindu gods calendar. It prominently featured major sacred Indian avatars such as Shree Ganesha, the hugely popular god who represents satiation and security; Saraswati Mata, the goddess of knowledge; Shree Krishna, Hanuman, who stands as a symbol of strength; Brahma, referred to as the supreme creator; Vishnu, the one who maintains the balance in the universe; Shiva, destroyer of the old and a few others. What a way to count days!

Indian Gods
Indian Gods
Indian Gods
Issue-42-Cover

Published in Issue 42

Every designer wish to be independent and willing to jump into the word of freelance but most of them unaware of the fundamental challenges of the initial phase. So, we dedicated this issue to freelancers and interviewed some established and talented designers to dig deep for the expert advice. Kevin Roodhorst on the other hand, an experienced freelancer from Amsterdam, has recently shifted to be a full-timer with an Agency says “Freelancing is not all roses!” and shared the best way to survive as a freelancer! So, whether you are a freelancer or planning to be one, this issue is a must-read. Go ahead and order your copy here or subscribe to not miss any future issues!

 

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Showcasing new packaging design trends making their mark this fresh year. Check out all that’s new and all that’s found its way from the past into the present. There’s so much to discover!

Design, design everywhere! There is so much design in this world, today, considering the wide range of applications that it has. No doubt, it has become so much more relevant now than in the past. If you take a good look at it, you realise how design has changed across various mediums in time and taken new shape and perspective.

 

With that in mind, here we highlight some of the new trends that have found their way into the existing design scenario and those that have carried on through generations to come forth even in current times. Take a good look; you never know what it might strike!

01
Flat Design

Flat is in. Something that has been in vogue for a long time now, it continues to remain the ideal way of display, presentation and functionality as well. The classic flat can be seen in various shapes and patterns up to this day. Be it squares or rectangles, the flat is here to stay.

Brandiziac - Packaging
packaging design
startup

02
Minimal Design

Minimal is the new thing to do. Gone are the days of congested, over-informative and heavily loaded design with overwhelming patterns, colours and shapes. Instead, design has grown to become not only smart but so also ‘essential’. That just makes it easier to focus attention on what really matters, doesn’t it? Clear, simple minimal.

Packaging

Designed by
– Łobzowska Studio and Marysia Markowska

Inspiring Packaging

03
The Colors

Bold Colors

“Colour, colour, which colour do you want?” Remember the game? Well, when it comes to current design, the answer is pretty clear and simple – Bold colours. They strike the eye well and stand out in a space filled with so many different shades without much effort. Bold is the new gold, indeed. It does the job and in a striking fashion, that’s hard to miss.

successful packaging
Packaging

Designed by Marco Serena

Packaging

Pastel Colors

Pastel colours are quite contrary to the widespread trend of bold tones and shades. That is one of the reasons they go so well with subtle messages that need to find their way through the clutter of loud designing. It is one way to be heard and seen without creating an unnecessary fuss in a space that is filled with noisy and flashy features.

Packaging

Designed by Creatsy Official

Packaging

Designed by ChocoToy cute


04
Bold Typography

Bold is big and bold is beautiful. It speaks loud and clear, without room for doubt, thus putting across the message in a way that leaves no scope for any kind of distortion or dilution. It has, for this very reason, become so much of a trend to find big and bold typo in bold shades and backgrounds. Look around, it’s everywhere.

packaging design
packaging design
Packaging
Bombay Brasserie - The Indian Culinary Expert

05
Patterns & Shapes

Geometric

Geometry is present in everything. Right from a needle to the very solar system, everything is geometric in nature – something worth considering when it comes to design too. After all, geometry is perfection and can never feel wrong if all is in sync. So also with the design elements, the right geometry never fails.

Packaging

Designed by oraviva! designers

Packaging

Designed by IWANT design

Custom Shapes and Elements

Made to fulfill the need of the hour based on the relevant context of communication, custom shapes and elements such as hand-drawn illustrations give an unmimicable touch to branding. They need not necessarily be symmetric or “perfect” in size and proportion but more a trademark style. What better than an un-mimicable touch, isn’t it!
Inspiring Packaging
Packaging

Designed by Lucas Wakamatsu

Vintage

The term “Vintage” speaks for itself and needs no real explanation. It is synonymous of a strong level of integrity and effect that has lasted the test of time without compromising on its originality. “Vintage” will never be old; it is here to stay for a long time to come if not forever.

Inspiring Packaging
Packaging

Designed by
– Auge Design and Giovanni Stillittano

Packaging

Doodles/ Illustrative

Doodle-doodle on the wall, haven’t we all?  Well, this is a trend that had lasted generations and seems to never get old—’cause doodles are always fun, spontaneous and hence unique, never exactly the same as another. That is why they’ve found their way well in the design culture too and are highly impactful especially with the youth.

Packaging

Designed by Backbone Branding

NH1 - Vada Pav

06
Unusual Materials & Shapes

The unusual never fails to be noticed and make an impression. So also it is when it comes to design – everything from weird shapes to all kinds of materials, the sky is the limit. With the kind of tools available today, it is not difficult to execute that which is not so common. No shape is odd and no material is wrong.

Packaging

Designed by Backbone Branding


07
Holographic Effects

The holographic effect used to be ‘the’ thing to do at one point in time due to its shiny, glittery nature. It is here to stay, though, as it finds it s way into the current design scene. The lure of the vintage never fails to shine even in new times. Holographs would catch our eye on any given day, including today apparently.

Packaging

Designed by Anagrama Studio


08
Gradients in Packaging

Now, here’s something new and definitely worthwhile. One shade just doesn’t seem enough sometimes, so there’s a whole range of it. Just a tone lighter or a shade darker can create and put together a whole series of gradient design. Isn’t that amazing, the entire rainbow is available to put on display!

Inspiring Packaging
Packaging

Designed by Marco Serena

Packaging

Designed by Backbone Branding

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Reaching out to the Indian society for social issues is not everyone’s cup of tea. But some master this art and show us how this can be done by being bold yet sensitive. Browse through Geeta Parulekar’s work to get an idea!

social issues

With creativity running in her blood, Geeta always wanted to create something unique apart from the regular college assignments. This got her illustrating on social issues like rape, LGBT and racism to name a few, believing in the fact that this was the right way to present her thoughts to the public.

While researching on the social issue of the time, LGBT, Geeta came to the realisation that ‘Love has no gender’. Playing cards are something that is seen and used by everyone in our society. The face cards portray two same-gender beings on a single card and this became Geeta’s inspiration for her LGBT project illustrations.

Her style of illustrations is delicate and subtle, aimed at addressing extremely bold topics or social issues without hurting anyone. A fan of the vintage look and the Indian traditional miniature style of art, her artwork has a reflection of the same. To make LGBT more acceptable in the society, Geeta not only restricted herself to creating illustrations for publications but also designed motifs for t-shirts and coasters to support the movement.

The LGBT project illustrates all the three sexual orientations on three types of playing cards i.e. gay, lesbians and heterosexuals. The fourth card reveals the message of the campaign – ‘Love has no gender’

Issue-42-Cover

Published in Issue 42

Every designer wish to be independent and willing to jump into the word of freelance but most of them unaware of the fundamental challenges of the initial phase. So, we dedicated this issue to freelancers and interviewed some established and talented designers to dig deep for the expert advice. Kevin Roodhorst on the other hand, an experienced freelancer from Amsterdam, has recently shifted to be a full-timer with an Agency says “Freelancing is not all roses!” and shared the best way to survive as a freelancer! So, whether you are a freelancer or planning to be one, this issue is a must-read. Go ahead and order your copy here or subscribe to not miss any future issues!

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
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Ankur Patar

Ankur Patar has won many national and international awards during his journey. With over 13 years of advertising experience, Ankur has worked with agencies such as DDB, JWT, Goodby Silverstein & Partners, McCan, Adobe, Femina, Puma, Lenovo and many more.


Featured In


We dedicated this issue to Digital Art where we explored the connection between our dreams and imagination and how the flexibility of technology can be used to document that. In his exclusive article, Android Jones explains the broader perspective of digital art. Featuring Ankur Singh Patar, Archan Nair, Harshvardhan Kadam and Aamina Shazi Arora, every article discusses how each of them has an individual way of working and yet they all look at life beyond the obvious to appreciate it’s beauty. So, go ahead

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Real is believable. But abstract teases the imagination. You don’t have to choose one of the two while creating. Mixing reality with abstract is the way to go according to digital artist Ankur Singh Patar. Whether it’s creating a portrait or manipulating a photograph, the digital art is capable of going as far as your imagination can take it. He shares what to keep in mind when working on the digital medium.

Digital Art
Digital Art
University of Queensland
Digital Art
University of Queensland

Let your artwork play the guessing game.

Realism, disguised with abstraction, makes for an interesting artwork. Abstract art has no boundaries, no set of protocols and no clear message. The fun part is that even though you’ve created the piece with a certain subject in mind, every viewer will comprehend it according to their thinking and imagination and arrive at different conclusions. Realism is important because it helps to connect with the viewers.

Digital Art
Harp and Rabaab
Digital Art
Pandit Ji
Digital Art
Campaign for Adobe

The challenge is to re-create the already-created.

When a famous personality is your subject, it’s important to think beyond how others have portrayed him/her. It gives you the chance to surprise not only yourself as an artist but also the audience. Doing some research, like going through some of the best creative works on the subject, is always recommended. You’ll notice that most portraits are hand-drawn sketches or paintings. That’s why exploring the digital medium can work wonders as it gives you limitless scope and opportunities to experiment.

Digital Art
Anom
Digital Art
God of Small Things
Digital Art
Femina Illustration
Digital Art
Festival of Colours

Creating digital portraits makes your work stand out. It also allows for the beautiful creation and merging of abstract elements along with unique colours. Now that’s different!

Digital Art
M.S. Dhoni
Digital Art
Rafael Nadal
Digital Art
Roger

Colours are the protagonists.

Our subconscious mind is capable of communicating with colours. After all, they are the expressions of our emotions, feelings, thoughts and moods. That’s why, most of the time, you’ll find that the colours you chose were done without a thought. Sometimes it’s better not to plan them and let them be spontaneous. However, sometimes they need to be monitored with respect to the design. A primary colour is an important ingredient as it sets the mood. Including a splash of contrasting colours supports and emphasizes the message and feeling which are embedded in the design.

Digital Art
Scent of a Woman
Digital Art
Udda
Digital Art
Ghagga

A colour on its own is incomplete.

Colours are like a language. Like certain words hold different meanings when used in different contexts, so do colours. You can use the same colour to represent smile in one artwork and laughter in another. It’s how you combine it with other colours and look at a painting as a whole to tell the complete story.

Digital Art
The Catwoman
Digital Art
Djokovic
Digital Art
Surjit Patar

Photo manipulation is not an easy way out.

Using real photographs in your artwork and building around it is equally challenging. You need the right photographs to begin with. Once you’ve got it, you start planning what effect or things you want to do with it. The best way is to work along the way and alter your design a numerous times before you finish. You add an element and then may be tomorrow when you look at it again, you replace it with something better. That’s how your design grows and a photograph evolves from a subject into a story and finally becomes a piece of art.

Digital Art
Stairs to Heaven
Digital Art
Mad Scientist - Lenovo
Digital Art
Prison Break Fan Art

Published in Issue 14

We dedicated this issue to Digital Art where we explored the connection between our dreams and imagination and how the flexibility of technology can be used to document that. In his exclusive article, Android Jones explains the broader perspective of digital art. Featuring Ankur Singh Patar, Archan Nair, Harshvardhan Kadam and Aamina Shazi Arora, every article discusses how each of them has an individual way of working and yet they all look at life beyond the obvious to appreciate it’s beauty. So, go ahead

 

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To meet the ever-changing demands of the Indian urban homes to be in-sync with the contemporary trends and lifestyles, Godrej is launching its new design brand Script outlined by Codesign.

The Challenge

The script is a new brand by Godrej & Boyce, offering contemporary furniture & decor accessories across mass-premium, urban markets in India.

 

Urban home living today throws up a new set of challenges via changing social behaviour, space availability, family structures, aspirations and global exposure to design and lifestyle. This necessitated a re-imagination of furniture—from lifestyles that adapt to established forms of furniture, to furniture that responds and adapts to activities & behaviour. Urban India as we know it, is changing—with people trying to find more meaning and relevance in everything they do, from food to fashion, work & mobility, it’s the time of new living.

The Script Project
The Script Project

The Solution

Contemporary India’s active pursuit of an openness to change formed the premise of design thinking for Script products & services. Codesign was commissioned in the early days of product development, to work in close collaboration with the internal project team, to identify & articulate the core brand idea and create a visual identity system through audios and visuals for the new brand.

The Script Project
The Script Project

Framing the Brand Narrative

‘Design for New Living’ is the soul of the Script brand, capturing the urban zeitgeist and acting as the north star for brand content—embedding a clear point-of-view within all communication.. ‘Design’ denotes the design-led approach of the brand, cueing both the purpose-built capability and higher aesthetic quotient and craftsmanship of the brand. ‘New Living’ denotes new practices or ways of living, that answer to challenges and aspirations of contemporary living.

The Script Project
The Script Project

Creating a Visual Vocabulary

The visual vocabulary for Script establishes an instantly recognizable and distinct aesthetic for the brand using fresh playful design elements in a cohesive and graphical play, evoking the core sense of newness & change.

 

The brand logo is a simple, sophisticated mark, that exudes warmth while standing out with its geometric construction. Derived from the logo, four Graphic Elements (the bar, bend, ring & half ring) open up a whole ecosystem of activity and play for the design language—cueing the smart agility & adaptability of the products.

The Script Project
The Script Project

The primary palette of Script, black & white provides a simple, yet bold canvas, to allow a variable colour play that is theme/product focussed and allows diverse storytelling about products and experience ecosystems.

 

Generously paced layouts and flexible grids allow for a simple but striking display of content. Photography guidelines set the framework for a distinct staging of product & settings that allow clear emphasis on functionality & form, and through consistency also build stronger brand recall.

Identity in Motion

On-screen, the visual vocabulary of the Script comes alive through audio-visual expressions with a characteristic motion—the Shift. Rhythmic & bold, the Shift moves with consistent pace and ease, to unveil new content and settings. The Shift moves on a simple grid across screens, allowing for greater consistency, while varying in orientation and scale.

The Script Project

The Logo signature uses only the characteristic Shift behaviour to decisively mark the beginning or end of branded content. While other elements in on-screen communication also use the Shift behaviour to move, its use in the logo signature reiterates brand presence through its starkness and simplicity.

The Script Project

The Graphic Elements inherit the Shift as the characteristic transition device and are designed for use both as single units and gridded patterns. A secondary expression of the Graphic Elements was designed to mark occasional communication, like a new season, range etc and uses 3-dimensional avatars of the elements with relevant surface treatments, suspended with gentle motion in space.

The Script Project

The Sound of New Living

The sonic identity of the brand celebrates the decisive motion of the Shift motion behaviour. Global, contemporary and agile—the master soundscape has multiple layers grounded in a base staccato string that complement the pace of motion. The instrumental character of the soundscape is balanced with an electronic undertone and harp-like sounds to infuse lightness and fluidity. The combination of diverse sounds within the composition evokes the diversity and adaptability of the brand products and appeals to a contemporary, global sensibility. The sound logo is a distilled essence of the soundscape and emphasises the bold pace of the logo signature animation as a stand-alone marker of a brand.

The Script Project
The Script Project

And The Result

Script marks the entry of the Godrej group into a new segment that is sharply differentiated from their established budget furniture brand Interio. It addresses emerging needs of contemporary lifestyle & home spaces and delivers solutions backed by Godrej’s intrinsic culture of design & manufacturing innovation. The freshness of the solution strategically enables a brand name as established as Godrej to reconnect with newer urban audiences and stand apart from its existing offering in the budget segment.

The Script Project

Client: Godrej & Boyce
Branding & Identity Design: Codesign
Moton & Sonic Design Partner: Addikt
Image Credits: All brand images & footage, courtesy Script.

The Script Project
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The magic of Indian mythology and its epic tales takes people by awe and surprise all throughout the world. They are intrigued by it in a way which makes them believers and followers of the same.

Indian Mythology

Considering Indian mythology as an ontological cosmological model, Giampaolo feels that it describes human sense in a poetic manner expressible by art.

 

Kamala Subramaniam’s colourful version of the Mahabharata, explaining the tragic attempt of humanity to elevate themselves from lower individual consciousness to a universal spiritual liberated condition, inspired Giampaolo to create his illustrative versions of the Mahabharata.

Indian Mythology

Before illustrating characters, Giampaolo does an intense research and study about them. He combines the understandings of the characters and the scenes from the explanations of the Mahabharat, descriptions from Bhaktivedanta and Srimad Bhagavatam’s texts and also the interpretations of a sanyasi as some of the information is purely from oral traditions.

Indian Mythology

To have a better understanding of the Indian culture and mythology, he even visited India in 2011. He spent some time at the School of Drama, New Delhi where he had the opportunity to go through the texts about history of Indian costumes. He returned back to Italy with his mind impregnated with details from the past.

Indian Mythology

Hand-Art: An Exclusivity

The difference between hand-made art and digital art is extremely similar to meeting people in actuality and meeting people over social networking sites. The coming in of digital art has not washed away the other forms of art. In the past, there has been a wide variety of expressions using various techniques and these pieces of art have been more dominant than the present day art pieces, barring a few. The beauty of the hand-made art lies in the human touch it has, which is missing from the digital art. It is exclusive in the way that one can feel the surface and texture of the hand-made painting by touching it and also feel the gestures and the strokes used by the artist to create the master piece.

Indian Mythology
Indian Mythology

The Emotional Attachment With the Illustration

Choosing the scene to illustrate is an emotional process for Giampaolo. When reading the book, he reads it rationally while understanding the plot, the tales, the intricate relations and the feelings that the scene expresses. This helps him visualise the story in his mind simultaneously while reading. He illustrates the scene that moves him the most on an emotional front. For instance, the end of Bhishmadev Pitamah on the bed of arrows was something that Giampaolo did not wish to illustrate, but the emotional sentiment that the incident has, which explains the characteristic of a great warrior that Bhishma was, is what moved the artist and got him visualising this scene.

Indian Mythology

Art is Self-Rewarding

He is immensely submerged in a continuous cycle of art production to create works to be exhibited at the end of a cycle. At present, he is working around the idea of “order and chaos”, which starts from a chaotic distribution of colors, followed by carving figures of women, animals etc to re-establish the lost consciousness on known models to overcome the terror of the unknown. A big fan of Indian mythology, he is soon going to start illustrations on the epic story of Ramayana.

 

He believes that one always learns from their mistakes and that practice is the best teacher!

Indian Mythology
Indian Mythology