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In a time when design and artworks surround us all, the importance of doing things differently is what counts. Illustrator, Iain Macarthur from England, discovered a unique way to marry pencil and pen to create intricate patterns and lines that result in surreal outcomes.

CG: Your designs are surreal and make use of carefully crafted patterns. What would you say is your illustration style and how did you work towards achieving it?

Iain: My surreal illustration style is very diverse, sometimes it can be a combination of elegant photo-realistic drawings or wildlife animals created in organic patterns. I began drawing in this style during my college years when I was experimenting pencil with other materials such as paint, charcoal and ink. When I introduced ink into my pencil drawings I immediately became addicted to using it into my work. The reason why I was experimenting pencil with other material is that I wanted to create a unique and unusual look to my work instead of just pencil all the time. The combination works magic.

CG: Your designs are dark and mysterious in appeal as well. What do you generally try and communicate through your designs? Is there a story involved in your illustrations or is it merely a depiction of your imagination?

Iain: Most of the pieces I make don’t necessarily have a story behind them. I get a lot of inspiration from nature, wildlife and traditional native patterns and weave them into my work. Women also inspire me, and I enjoy drawing their eyes to make them look mysterious. When I merge the patterns into my female subjects I like to create it as a decorative element like jewellery or a headdress as I think that form works really well with the pencil drawings.

CG: You seem to use simple tools while crafting your designs. Tell us about what tools and techniques you use in your designing process.

Iain: I mostly use pencils and ink, usually pigment liner pens such as Staedtler pens or Uni pens. They generate really thin and delicate lines that help me draw intricate patterns.

CG: How has illustration evolved over the years? What other potential do you see in this design form that hasn’t been discovered yet? How do you plan on using your illustrations to enhance user experience?

Iain: This illustration form can be used in many ways as it’s quite a decorative and presentable style in more ways than one. The style can be printed on products such as clothing, posters and skateboards and can also be used as tattoos, to name a few.

Published in Issue 28

This Illustration Special is best to know why and how illustration as a popular medium is taking the design world by storm! From evolution of illustrations to its place in the world today, renowned designers and illustrators like Abhishek Singh, Mukesh Singh, Archan Nair, Alicia Souza, Raj Khatri with some international talent such as Fil Dunsky from Russia, Iain Macarthur and Richard Field from UK, who live and breathe illustration, would be the right people to gain some insight from. With many more talents to explore with great insights and excellent techniques, again a fully packed issue is waiting to amaze you!

 

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Born in Swindon, England, Iain Macarthur is an Illustrator who gradated from Swindon College with a HND in Illustration in 2008. Working with pencil, and pigment pens, he has been inspired by various artists like James Jean, David Choong Lee, Sergio Toppi.


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This Illustration Special is best to know why and how illustration as a popular medium is taking the design world by storm! From evolution of illustrations to its place in the world today, renowned designers and illustrators like Abhishek Singh, Mukesh Singh, Archan Nair, Alicia Souza, Raj Khatri with some international talent such as Fil Dunsky from Russia, Iain Macarthur and Richard Field from UK, who live and breathe illustration, would be the right people to gain some insight from. With many more talents to explore with great insights and excellent techniques, again a fully packed issue is waiting to amaze you!

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In today’s international world, being a freelancer means being available to the entire world. No matter where you’re from, one needs to adapt to various clients and cultures to create a portfolio. Fil Dunsky, from Russia, with almost nothing Russian in his designs, uses humour and pun to make his illustrations work for brands all across. A little rendezvous gives more insight on how he creates what he does.

CG: Your illustrations are cartoonish in appeal. What is your style of illustrations? What would you call it? And what have been your inspirations during your design journey?

Fil Dunsky: For many designers, type of style is undefined. I don’ t know what my style is. All I know is that I put in a lot of love in my design, bake it and make it scrumptious so that the end user enjoys it. Through my design journey, my inspirations have been Oksana Grivina and Andrey Gordeev. Oksana was the first digital freelance illustrator I saw that mesmerised me. Ever since, I’ve been inspired by her work and learning her style and technique. And Andrey is my best friend who was the reason behind me leaving an office designer job to become a freelancer.

CG: From the look of it, your designs have a story. Where do you get such stories? 

Fil Dunsky: How designs manifest depends a lot on the task. Sometimes, the briefs are actually instructions that give less room for experimentation, and hence one simply has to recreate what the client imagines. No matter what the brief, the steps to arrive at an idea always remain the same. Boil the brief in your mind, sketch some ideas and then get one of them approved by the client before the chosen one is carefully finished. As for where I get my stories, well nature and creation are inspiring itself. Just look around. This world is so beautiful and full of stories, isn’t it?

CG: What would you say is ‘Russian’ about your illustrations? How has designing in Russia, enhanced your illustration style? How do you make your designs to relate to an international audience?

Fil Dunsky: I don’t think I have any Russian influence in my designs. I have never felt Russian, especially when the world has colluded and boundaries have been merged due to the internet revolution. Deep down inside, we are all international and there is no division that shows up in designs. Cultural influence comes from the client side at times, I feel. When I’ve drawn for clients from the UAE or China, they have specific cultural elements that need to be included. But that does not mean a designer needs to change his or her style.

CG: Your designs have a lot of elements in play. How do you create harmony amongst so many elements? How do you add your personal signature to all your designs?

Fil Dunsky: I’m just doing what I like, there is no struggle in that and nothing serious, pure humour and fun. I’m just playing.

Published in Issue 28

This Illustration Special is best to know why and how illustration as a popular medium is taking the design world by storm! From evolution of illustrations to its place in the world today, renowned designers and illustrators like Abhishek Singh, Mukesh Singh, Archan Nair, Alicia Souza, Raj Khatri with some international talent such as Fil Dunsky from Russia, Iain Macarthur and Richard Field from UK, who live and breathe illustration, would be the right people to gain some insight from. With many more talents to explore with great insights and excellent techniques, again a fully packed issue is waiting to amaze you!

 

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Thinking of how can a logo leave a long-lasting impression on the mind? Let’s dive into the ocean of inspirational logo designs and see what’s the best to keep the brand floating successfully!

Branding is all about creating an impression to survive, and this begins with a logo which personifies the brand, conveying its values to the users. With sudden and swift transformations of design trends in no time, it is quite a challenge to keep track and incorporate them. So, here we have enlisted some of the latest inspirational and trending styles for you to have a sneak-peek and get your brand all decked-up!

01

Responsive Logos

In todays world of infinite, to access a single solution from multiple devices, it is important for the logo to re-adapt itself to its display context, without loosing its original essence.

Experiment by: Joe Harrison
Designed by: Design.Studio

02

Animated Logos

A moving entity always catches more attention and also is more informative than a still entity. Brands, wanting to carve a niche for themselves in the market, are resorting to animated logos to convey their story in a smart, impactful manner.

Designed by: The Woork Co
Designed by: Beetroot Design
Designed by: The Woork Co
Designed by: The Woork Co
Designed by: The Woork Co

03

Colourful & Fun Logos

The technique of being bright and bold with a subtle yet effective element of fun is a witty way of capturing the attention of the readers. This sends out the message in a pleasant and entertaining way.

Designed by: Vadim Carazan

04

Negative Space

Having been floating around in the design market for quite a few years, negative space doesn’t seem to be losing its charm even now! Negative space in logo design is no more a plain space, but instead is juxtaposed with boldness of colours and the magic of geometric patterns.

Designed by: Vadim Carazan
Designed by: SeisTrece Studio
Designed by: Bureau Rabensteiner
Designed by: Andrei Traistă
Designed by: SeisTrece Studio

05

Monograms

Monogram is the evergreen essential of logo design. Monograms, although, a reminiscent of the evolution of the brand and a souvenir of the brand-image, are being merged with the latest trends of bright colours, duo-tones and geometric patterns to be modernised and fit into the present day logo world.

Designed by: Andrei Traistă
Designed by: Vadim Carazan
Designed by: Ivan Nikolic
Designed by: Vadim Carazan
Designed by: Romain Billaud

06

Geometric Shapes & Patterns

Creating a brand statement is not just about words anymore, but is all about the amalgamation of words and minimal geometric patterns, thus rendering a brand its originality.

Designed by: Quim Marin
Designed by: islam biko
Designed by: Vadim Carazan
Designed by: islam biko

07

Gradients

Gradients have been trending the market of the recent times and have also made their way into the world of logo design by being subtle and bold, in and out of sync, depending on the context.

Designed by: Vadim Carazan

08

Overlaps

With the trend of duotone becoming more and more popular, overlapping – a smart modification of duotones, is the new growing love in the world of logo design.

Designed by: Iris Valle
Designed by: Fontself Team
Designed by: Rosie Manning
Designed by: CaveLantern.

Fil Dunsky

Born in Khabarovsk, Russia, Fil Dunsky is a full time freelance illustrator drawing for well-known brands and worldwide advertising agencies since 2009. With bachelors in Graphic Design and Fine Arts, he worked in a design studio for two years before going solo.


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This Illustration Special is best to know why and how illustration as a popular medium is taking the design world by storm! From evolution of illustrations to its place in the world today, renowned designers and illustrators like Abhishek Singh, Mukesh Singh, Archan Nair, Alicia Souza, Raj Khatri with some international talent such as Fil Dunsky from Russia, Iain Macarthur and Richard Field from UK, who live and breathe illustration, would be the right people to gain some insight from. With many more talents to explore with great insights and excellent techniques, again a fully packed issue is waiting to amaze you!

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The barriers have broken and the people unified, all thanks to the World Wide Web. This, for designers is nothing less than a revolution. British freelance graphic designer, Chloe Galea, who now lives in Berlin, has made the most of this invention to provide modern designs for clients situated worldwide. Here, in a conversation with Creative Gaga, she tells us more about how she reaches out to the wider audience with her design and technology.

CG: Your designs seem very systematic, columned and well-organised. Is this your style? How do you and your design sense and techniques change when designing for the web, as compared to other canvases?

Chloë: Order and space are vital components in digital designing. I think it is aesthetics that I appreciate in many aspects of my life. As my flat is certainly bright, airy and decorated in a fairly limited palette. Plus, I think that my continued interest in print and editorial design has meant that I am always working with grids and looking at how best to structure the content I am given. The basics don’t change much when it comes to designing for digital or web either. The style still employs a grid, where careful attention is paid to typography and its hierarchy. At the same time, it is vital to strike a visual balance that makes the design look right. There are obviously different restraints that must be taken into account when working on print or digital design, but other than these technicalities, nothing much changes.

CG: Being European, where art and design are culturally embedded and dates back to memorable artists and evergreen creations; how are brands, clients and audience taking to the present web activity?

Chloë: It’s like homogeneous mixture, where it’s hard to separate both. There are certainly a few established brands I have worked with in London that have struggled to keep up with all the new technological and social developments. But I think everyone knows just how important it is now to have an intelligent curated presence online, to actively engage with the audience and stay up-to-date with the latest digital and web trends. That all said, the print isn’t going anywhere; it is ever evolving and finding new ways to remain relevant.

CG: As a designer, how do you stay abreast of latest design happenings and creations? How do you reach out to the world? How much do you depend on the web and how much does the web depend on you?

Chloë: There is no rocket science involved. Reading is important, spending time online is important. I lose hours to Pinterest as well as get out of the house, walk around the city, meet up with like-minded people and make a point of attending industry talks and events. While it would be a mistake to rely on the internet for all creative inspiration, I think no one would deny just what an amazing resource it is. It’s also a boon for freelancers out there as it facilitates promotion and communication with clients regardless of where they are in the world.

CG: What would be some traits and qualities that you feel should be present in a designer to be ready to create for the times of today? Have you had the opportunity to visit or work with any Indian clients?

Chloë: I went to a talk recently at Betahaus, Berlin and the speaker said there are three things a designer needs to be: talented, punctual and likeable. In terms of Indian clients, no I haven’t worked with any. However, I have spent some time in India and would love the opportunity to go back!

Published in Issue 25

Creative Gaga kicks off the year with an issue that asks the important questions, is it the web that’s leading the brands or the other way around? With 2014 witnessing an increase in brands investing in digital marketing, 2015 will only be bigger. We can say India has accepted the revolution, where more and more people are opening browsers to e-commerce, literally window shopping, and setting up shops online as well. The issue brings together renowned designers with digital experience, who discuss and throw light on the pros and cons of this change and where we possibly are headed with this in the future.

 

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Seerow Unni, a keen animator, takes us through his approach and process. He sheds light on how he arrives at improvising in the course of designing, and why it is so vital to enjoy each and every aspect of the progression.

The core intention is to convey the message.

For that, it is essential that one enjoys each and every moment of the process of creation, no matter how small or big the work. For example, rather than just as a simple image or illustration, one may perceive everything as a scene, like in a movie. This leads to adding details, emotions, fun and more to a scene. Similarly, when we get it right, fun or wit and humor are the easiest ways to make people fall in love with what we create. Improvisation, likewise, is a part and parcel of the experience. From the very beginning, one may sustain the habit of keeping a close eye on the developments that are happening in the world of creative designing. For instance, I had started with the traditional canvas and then with time, shift to the digital medium.

One may continue to keep familiar and updated with the works of renowned digital artists. This automatically teaches to adapt to the needs of the changing times.

Diversity is a boon in the form of a challenge.

Dealing with different clients from diverse fields means they all have different requirements. They all demand a new approach, something that’s entirely path-breaking in the making of their animated film. This gives the freedom to keep the entire setting as well as characters so different from previous work. One must look at this as an opportunity instead of as a challenge and, no matter how big or small the work is, enjoy it to the fullest. Even if you are good in it, keep practicing and never stop sketching. It is equally important that you follow the famous artists and be updated about the trends and changes in design. There is no shortcut to success; as hard work always pays off in the end.

Changing with the times involves observing the direction.

The trend this year is shifting towards clean and minimal design from the complex, elaborated ones. Flat designs are going to be in the limelight. The idea is to keep things simple and minimal. In fact, minimalism is probably going to be a huge trend this year, not just in design, but in all walks of life. The challenge to come up with new ideas would be of galactic proportion. But simplicity is the way to go forth, and it has got a lot of untapped potentials. We will be able to see these elements everywhere from movie titles to logos and other mediums. As far as perception goes, our audiences have always been game for positive changes. They will embrace the change with open arms.

Published in Issue 41

Every year brings many opportunities and hopes along with celebrations. For this issue, we reached many visual artists and designers to know their expectations from the year 2018. This issue’s cover designer, Shreya Gulati is exceptionally impressed by the advancement of technology in design, especially how VR & AR has impacted new ways of creating. Honing and sharpening one’s skills is always a quest for every creative. So, whether you have many or none expectations for the year, this issue is a must-read. Go ahead and order your copy here or subscribe to not miss any future issues!

 

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Chloë Galea is a British graphic designer, currently living and working in Berlin, Germany. After a number of years working at Pencil Agency in London, she now works as a freelancer. Her skills encompass both print and digital, with the majority of clients coming from the fashion, luxury and lifestyle industries.


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Creative Gaga kicks off the year with an issue that asks the important questions, is it the web that’s leading the brands or the other way around? With 2014 witnessing an increase in brands investing in digital marketing, 2015 will only be bigger. We can say India has accepted the revolution, where more and more people are opening browsers to e-commerce, literally window shopping, and setting up shops online as well. The issue brings together renowned designers with digital experience, who discuss and throw light on the pros and cons of this change and where we possibly are headed with this in the future.

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From a back bench doodler to a fine-arts graduate from JNAFAU Hyderabad, Sri Priyatham specialised in the art of caricature, to work with a clientele like Microsoft India, Redmond, Deloitte to name a few and to be published in The Hindu, Deccan Chronicle,etc. He is soon launching his pet project, “The Art Factory” in Hyderabad to conduct art classes.


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Sri Priyatham takes us through his beautiful journey of establishing himself as a freelance illustrator in the digitalised world of today. Here, he also highlights the merits and demerits of being a freelancer.

Earning his very first commission from his bedroom turned studio, Priyatham took to freelancing by metamorphosing his passion into profession, without having to leave the comfort of his home. An ardent believer of a conventional lifestyle without weekends, he feels not working under someone allows a free-flowing lifestyle and an individuals’ diversified growth.

Starting is Important

Facebook as a medium has worked wonders for Priyatham since his very start as an art student and a budding freelancer, for his communications, promotions and commissions. The outburst of other social platforms like Instagram, Reddit and Imgur helped him extend his reach to the continents of America, Europe and Australia to earn his clientele.

It is up to you!

Preferring freelancing over a day-job, Priyatham feels that freelancing is an individuals’ choice to make. An efficiently flexible working method, freelancing lets a professional explore and expand his horizon, to develop and revamp his personal skill-set, much-needed for survival.

Having its own positives and negatives, freelancing can be quite challenging. Time flexibility and absence of a pressure factor, unlike day-jobs, calls for a lot of self-motivation and commitment to deliver within the self-created deadline. Freelancing gets one working throughout the week, devoid of weekends and a social-life, unlike the conventional lifestyle. Inconsistent income and unrealistic price negotiations are some short-comings of this profession.

Also, a lot of fake freelancer-artist profiles in the market lead to a generalization of genuine and false artists in the same category, leading to a region-specific freelance deficiency.

The Freelancer Way!

To enter into the freelance market, one needs to befriend and fellow freelancers through collaborations and social media. Acquainting to existing standards, price charts and market likes and dislikes. To be in the limelight and attract future-potential clients, a freelancer needs to promote himself and his work by nominalising prices and offering discounts, creating promotional content and upgrading the portfolio with new-refreshing content, besides delivering ongoing projects in time!

Illustrating by blending creativity with trends and expressing it by #hash-tagging and wordplay is a smart tool to grow the followers list. But to translate the ‘following’ into ‘buying’, (or convert the followers into clients,) a freelancer needs to maintain high-quality standards.

Apart from being an illustrator, Priyatham is a movie-buff and a trendy reader. The variety of reads on Reddit and Quora serve as an inspiration for him to illustrate and sketching his favorite actors and film-makers motivates him. He is happy that his passion for art is an obsession!

Reaching out to the budding freelancers, Priyatham says that this is a slow process and requires consistency to be successful. One should be inspired and draw every day, just how you breathe, in-order to be better than yesterday. Making social profiles public and communicating and presenting yourself in the best way to mark your presence in the digital world is most needed in todays’ era.

Published in Issue 34

This is a rebranding special issue focused on finding the answers to some of the basic questions like what is the right time for re-branding? or what all needs changing and how exactly? We interviewed some of the best branding studios like Landor Mumbai, Elephant, VGC, Inchwork, and many more. If you are considering rebranding or want to learn more about the art of doing it then this issue is a must read. So, go ahead

 

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