Currents in the graphic design world are constantly changing, and those trends that keep adapting, growing and switching affect the entire business world. If you want to release a product, create a new website, rebrand your business, or invest in your advertising, you need to know what is in and what is popular right now.

However, quality and popularity are two very different terms that you need to have in mind. Some trends are popular for a short time –they light up in flames as fast as they go out. So, if you’re on a serious project and you’re in need of a valuable design that won’t be forgotten quickly, then you need to do your homework and find out which trends will be left with a quality stamp. The following definitely worth your attention.


Asymmetry

Although symmetry isn’t dead, it’s clear that it’s now shadowed by a trend which enables richer options when it comes to composition – asymmetry. Because of its form, asymmetry opens more possibilities for accenting; it’s simpler to make action buttons visible this way, for example.

words

Bold Colours

Pastel and soft colours are now a thing of the past – neon as well, thankfully. During this year, many outstanding pieces of graphic design contained two strong, vibrant colours. If you decide to go with this trend, you can be positive that your brand will stand out.

5 Essential Tools of Motion Graphics

Geometric Shapes 

Those with OCD will be happy to know that there’s still some structure left. Geometric shapes have been introduced to graphic design, and it’s not at all uncommon to see them used as a minimalistic element. So, if you desire simplicity, this is a trend you should turn to.

Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
All About by Anant Kulkarni
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Phone Cover Design Applications by Anant Kulkarni

Illustrations 

When we speak about the trends that marked 2017, illustrations must be mentioned. Original artwork finally found its place in the contemporary graphic design, so you shouldn’t be surprised if your run into a website that consists only of illustrations. They give a whimsical storytelling vibe to the digital world.

While we’re on the subject, you should also pay attention to modern retro – it has very interesting elements that simultaneously breathe with urban and vintage. These two currents will give your business a spirit and make it alive.

Meroo Seth

Dynamics 

If you’re ready to go beyond limits and incorporate something completely different into your brand, then you should know that now is a perfect time. Dynamics designs that are completely chaotic and without any frames or outer lines are a new movement that’s taking over the internet. So, if you think you need something bold, daring and unexpected, this is the thing for you.

Another consequence of disorder is a mixture of photography and other elements – open composition. So now you don’t have to dwell on a decision in order to figure out whether you want to implement photos or original artwork to your business because you can go with both.


Playful Fonts 

Up until recently, graphic design was minimalistic, which also implied that the lettering needs to be neat and clean. However, these limits were also broken, and now it’s not at all uncommon to come across playful writings, scattered letters and cropped titles. It’s a trend that goes well together with reigning chaos and designs without determined restrictions.

It’s obvious that this trend can do damage to your business – it takes a real professional to develop a design like this that works well, so make sure you find the right person for the job.

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Cinemagraphs 

A wonderful addition to all trends listed above are cinemagraphs – a moving picture is the final puzzle piece that the world of graphic design needs. However, simplicity is the key here; if you want to implement a cinemagraph on your website, make sure that it doesn’t draw too much attention to what you have to offer. But, if you make the right decision, you can be positive that it will leave a wow impression on your visitors.

It’s obvious that minimalism which was extremely popular up until this year, became boring to everyone. So now, graphic designers worldwide turned to drawing and experimenting, and welcomed chaos into their work. Each of the trends listed above will linger on – it’s up to you to see which one is the most suitable for what you have in mind and need realized.

Pune-based design agency, Elephant Design, recently displayed the power of the British Bulldog, Witlinger beer’s powerful mascot, in a re-branding initiative and process for the beverage company. Here is how they did it, as we run through the process behind the whole act.

When Pune-based design agency, Elephant, was approached to bring the powerful brand mascot to life, it did so by means of an upfront, affirmative and assertive new visual representation on the bottle to communicate Witlinger’s truly British personality.

#BlodyBritish - British Bulldog

Witlinger’s Wheat Ale is India’s first wheat beer, unique because of its distinctive sweet orange and coriander flavours, much like Witlinger’s Lager that has a distinctive lemon grass finish and is brewed with British Hops. The British origins of these beverages, and so also the associated touch of the region that can be found in them, is something that cannot be ignored or concealed. It is this very quality that was chiefly used as the foundation or basis of Witlinger’s re-branding initiative, proudly declaring and proclaiming the same to the world without any sense of guilt or restraint through the ‘British Bulldog’, Witlinger’s symbol and mascot.

#BlodyBritish - British Bulldog

The renewed and refined design with ‘British Bulldog’ as a mascot symbolises Witlinger’s true British origins in a fun and honest way, while mainly conveying a message of being bold. In light of this transformation, referring to the brand’s renewed design, Mr. Anuj Kushwah, Managing Director and Founder said, “This is an exciting time for Witlinger as we are showcasing our true identity and characteristics of being very British and honest with what we do i.e. making sincere and honest craft beer. This definitely adds fun in drinking good craft beer with the great bold design.

While many craft beers try to keep their origins vague or unclear, Witlinger decided to be a brand that rather wanted to convey its British roots unapologetically and openly. “We decided to leave the cliched British iconography, and found a true hero in British bulldog! The idea is to bring various facets of the persona to life on align with each of the crafted brews.” said Ashwini Deshpande, Co-founder, Director of Elephant.

#BlodyBritish - British Bulldog

Operating since as long ago as 1989, Elephant is a leading strategic design agency with presence in India and Singapore, engaging clients such as Britannia, MTR, Paper Boat, and the likes. The agency recognized the emblematic power behind this concept, and decided to stick with it through the means and processes of illustration and symbolism, knowing that it would bring about the desired impact and effect on the audience.

Each illustration or work of design is a new process and a new insight. From the wide variety of design work that Creative Gaga feature each year, at the end of the year we take a moment to acknowledge all of them by highlighting top 10 featured Illustrators of 2017. Here we go.

Featured Illustrator - Nithin Rao Kumblekar

1. Nithin Rao Kumblekar

Nithin Rao Kumblekar is not only an illustrator but also an Art Director and Concept Artist who has illustrated for and brands such as OLX, Century Ply, and the likes, apart from having worked on a vast range of projects. In this assignment, conceived and executed for AVP, a pet food company catering to the likes of household dogs and cats. He represents a direct connection between these adored domestic companions and their very beloved treats, thus portraying the animals directly interacting with AVP in a fun, colourful and real-like animated setting.

More Project Illustrations are here


Featured Illustrator - Mukesh Singh

2. Mukesh Singh

Khyber Nights is a life-like and realistic story of survival, love and loss. Based on the unruly frontier surrounding the Khyber Pass during the Soviet war with Afghanistan in the late 80’s. This cover art for the intense tale was created by Marvel artist, Mukesh Singh, in an effort to summarise a gripping narrative that is about sisterhood and brotherhood winning over the politics of war. Using a strong sense of lighting and character expressions, he does indeed capture the tale in the frame.

Mukesh’s more illustrations are here


happiness-Lavanya Naidu

3. Lavanya Naidu

A graduate of the National Institute of Design, Lavanya Naidu is an Animator and Illustrator. Her style of work is a representation and expression of focusing on producing work that is personally challenging and cherished, rather than just going about creating ‘what is required as per the brief’. She uses a very fun and lively colour scheme that is both vibrant and subtle, very much like the characters, environments, settings, and characters she chooses to portray.

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Induce Happiness with Your Work!


Create Your Style

4. Bhaskar Rac

Bhaskar Rac is a self-employed Concept and 3D artist. A graduate of Delhi College of Art (Applied Art), he works extensively in character development, 3D sculpting, and the likes. As someone who trusts in honing one’s own style, instead of trying to imitate fashionable cult or style, nurturing and developing refreshing ideas is his primary intention. Here, he simply starts off with initial sketches, further gathering all the related references, structuring, line drawings and then rendering. Likewise, he finds a balance between minimalism and amplification through colours, emotions, lines, contours and the likes in order to capture the main essence of the subject.


5. Anna Dittmann

Graduating from Savannah College of Art and Design in Georgia,  Anna Dittmann is a freelance digital illustrator who tries to evoke different emotions through her portraits. Here, using subtle facets with natural fundamentals, she manages to capture the emotions of the viewer, thus mainly tapping into and drawing their attention to it. Gaining insight and motivation from movement and raw shapes by blending nonfigurative conceptual and innate elements, she created this soothing piece through an amalgamation of fictional and realistic elements. Using pastels, watercolours, and oils here, she tries to capture an impulsiveness in the artwork.


Ancient Future

6. Omar Gilani

From Peshawar, Pakistan, Omar Gilani is a Double-Masters in Robotics from Washington DC and has an eye for discovering the modern in the ancient, something that is purely a matter of enhanced or evolved vision. And, so, his desire to renew the old and transform what is considered obsolete or irrelevant into the opposition stems from his work, ‘Desret Warrior Aunty’. He predominantly uses lighting to determine the initial composition of a piece. Importantly, dividing the canvas into simple black and white shapes to see if all the various aspects are harmonious helps him achieve the final piece which is full of colour and life-like vibrancy.


Siddhi Ranade - tale-telling

7. Siddhi Ranade

With a Commercial Arts from L. S. Raheja School of Arts, Mumbai, Siddhi Ranade trusts that geometry, colour and the subject are crucial features. As someone who feels that design needs to be time relevant in constantly modifying times, he pays attention to every tool that he uses in the making of his work. Over here, for example, geometry, pattern, and proportion in symmetry are not just advantageous but the very fundamentals. ‘Line’, for example, is the primary factor to achieve without any compromise. Colours finally add a mood to it in a more theatrical and impressive way that further dictates or overpowers the final piece.


8. Juan Casini

Juan Casini is a designer of multiple disciplines who experiments and works through various mediums. He trusts that ‘nature is art in its purest form’, and thus takes a lot of inspiration from it, thereby representing elements of nature through a lot of his designs. For example, over here, he tries to create a powerful and stimulating experience for the audience. In an effort to keep the level of expression rather intense, he goes on to add multiple layers of detail while experimenting with the colour palette. What that helps him achieve is that, no matter what the product is about, the eyes of the viewer can be positively held by the artwork.

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9. Rohan Dahotre

Rohan Dahotre is an illustrator who feels strongly about nature and gains inspiration from the beauty of it. The core of his work lies in making the complexities of nature simple – for example, turning complex organic forms into simple shapes. Experimenting with pictures from the wild – mainly animals – and giving them a new visual representation and overall look, he tries to display the real beauty that resides within the amazing bounty of forest animals, all so that people learn to appreciate and better treat and respect them and their habitat.


Indian thelas

10. Ranganath Krishnamani

Ranganath Krishnamani is a designer specialising in Illustration, User Experience and Art Direction. This piece of artwork is a personal or self-initiated project through which he finds connection with his own origin in the south Indian city of Bangalore in Karnataka, India. Through the means of this series, he intends to portray some of the most interesting and intriguing selling-carts from across the Indian subcontinent. The basic idea stems from his nostalgic memories of him running out onto the street upon recognising the arrival of assorted carts and their bearings, something commonly found through most of India.

Kolkata based Sagnik Sengupta, a designer and music lover, narrates how he executed an exciting yet challenging idea for a football promo, and the tools it took him to transmit it onto the screen.

The Football Promo
The Football Promo

References keep you on track

The brief was to show the essence of football and to justify what really makes football fans believe so much in the game. A reference by the promo team showed a man forming while running with the ball. I wanted to take that idea further and add more edge to it. So I decided to experiment with Motion Capture.

The Football Promo
The Football Promo

Carry your concept all the way

The concept was to show the players in an alternate world, each representing some of the teams taking part in the Champions League, and performing specific moves that bring dynamism and intensity to the game. I chose to lay the focus on the players and their actions, then on the environment. With the entire sequence mapped mentally, I found the specific actions in MoCap and tweaked them. I used an X-Particles, a third party particle simulation plugin, for the ball to have some kind of a particle-trail to it.

The Football Promo
The Football Promo

A good designer is in sync with one’s tools

It was easy to play with MoCap data in Cinema 4D, with its inbuilt Mograph module. The Mass and the ‘Force’ tab of the dynamic tag really helped. Same goes for the ribbon. A lot of tweaking was involved. The ‘Shader Effector’ came in really handy in specifying colours to the particles, and giving them the jersey look of each team. For lighting, I used GreyscaleGorilla’s Lighting Kit and HRDI Studio Pack to achieve the overall goal!

The Football Promo
The Football Promo
The Football Promo
Issue 40-Motion Graphics Special

Published in Issue 40

We all have favourite TV shows and we passionately discuss the stories and characters of it. But sometimes, we tend to ignore the channel and its branding. Now with many different channels to choose from, we are experiencing many new branding overhauls to grab the audience’s attention. In this issue, we focused on Motion Graphics design and people behind some awesome channel rebrandings. This issue features interviews with some of the well-known studios and teams of Motion Graphics from India and overseas, including FutureDeluxe Studio from London, Dynamite Design, Adaar and RocketScience Lab from India. It also includes digital artist, Renju MV, highlighting his exceptional control over the medium. If you are interested in moving design or animated content then this issue is a must-read for you!

 

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Passionate about sculpting human forms, Japanese artist, Nagato Iwasaki uses driftwood to create life-size human sculptures that are slightly creepy, yet beautiful.

Beauty of Human Sculptures

Imagine yourself in a horror movie, face-to-face with a zombie. Scary, isn’t it?

 

This nightmarish experience is probably what the humanoid sculptures by Nagato Iwasaki’s ‘Torso’ evoke at a glance.

Beauty of Human Sculptures
Beauty of Human Sculptures

However, slowly, a sense of mystery sets in as you begin to look at each of these sculptures, standing tall with a distinct personality. It is then, that you start observing the details and begin to see the beauty in these life-like human figures made completely out of driftwood.

Beauty of Human Sculptures
Beauty of Human Sculptures
Beauty of Human Sculptures

The warped wooden pieces are not bent, shaved or processed in any way. The talented artist uses wooden stakes to put the pieces together to create these stunning installations. Although faceless, these sculptures have indiscernible realism as individual pieces of wood, of varying shapes and sizes, fill the parts of the body naturally.

Beauty of Human Sculptures
Beauty of Human Sculptures

Every piece is built to stand on its own without support.

Placed in real-world environments, these sculptures appear to have a purpose of their own, silently still, yet being significant.

Beauty of Human Sculptures
Beauty of Human Sculptures
Beauty of Human Sculptures
Beauty of Human Sculptures

“Much like our own bodies will all one day rot away and return to the earth, so too will my pieces likely suffer a similar fate. Wood has that sort of "organic" appeal to it, and I believe that is why I was drawn to the concept of using driftwood to begin with,” explains Nagato Iwasaki.

Beauty of Human Sculptures
Beauty of Human Sculptures
Beauty of Human Sculptures
Beauty of Human Sculptures
Beauty of Human Sculptures

Sachin Puthran was there when it all happened. It was 1995; the time of hand-drawn illustrations, airbrushed finished images and cut-paste typesetting. Digital was slowly coming in, bringing with it a generation gap. There was an air of fear in the older Art Directors as the younger generation, fascinated by Mac user interface, was already learning software. Below, he takes us on the journey of an Artist, from then to now.

Art From Pencil to Stylus
The Yakshangana Performer

The Analog Age

The earlier generation was blessed with the passion and experience of using the tactile medium. It gave the true satisfaction of working on various surfaces using different media and styles. Everybody knows art back then was a luxury, a rich passion. “It was larger than life,” says Sachin “where expressions were a physical manifestation of the artist’s vision. People travelled to view art in public spaces. Getting to see and meet the artist was truly an experience of joy and inspiration. Nothing came easy.”

Art From Pencil to Stylus
The Coconut Tree

Art for Art’s Sake

According to Sachin, traditional artists still swear by the smell, the touch and the feel of the traditional medium. That’s because they seemed to have understood the sensitivity and developed a purist approach to Art. They were the ones who stuck to the medium and rejected the so-called ‘digital medium’ that was going to take them by surprise in a few years. But the fear had set in.

Art From Pencil to Stylus
Waiting

 The Advent of Computers

The arrival of first generation computers in the early 90s opened a Pandora’s box for visual artists to explore the slow but responsive medium. Reminiscing about those days. Softwares were slowly heading towards capturing the artist’s imagination. Suddenly the advantages and disadvantages of painting digitally were getting clearer. The needs and demands of clients started changing fast. For the first time, the clock was ticking digitally. Everything that was wanted tomorrow was being delivered today.

Art From Pencil to Stylus
Ramanuj

The Magic of Cinema

This was the time when technology was ahead of its users. Hollywood started using high-end Visual Effects or VFX and changed the art of storytelling. “There was only a thin line of difference between science fiction and realism. Software and hardware could now do magic. The Internet made downloading a popular new phenomenon. Suddenly there was a paradigm shift.” During that period, the world was changing and not everybody was able to keep up with it.

Art From Pencil to Stylus
Work in progress Mumbai

The New Millennium Generation

A creative visualising power was not enough to survive in this era. Art Directors were required to know paint and design software as well. That’s how visual grammar changed over the years, as designers incorporated photo manipulation techniques and digital retouching to create surreal imagery. “Every software upgrade brought in more features and capabilities,” says Sachin, “so much so that one day, artists were lost and filters were in.”

Art From Pencil to Stylus
JijamataUdyan Mumbai

More Clutter

The designer was engulfed by the software in the next few years, as they relied more on software and less on their skills. “Ideas were driven by styles that were possible quickly on digital. Tactile sensitivity was lost and the rat race had truly begun.” Sachin tells us. “Social media added to the confusion, as it allowed designs to be circulated and critiqued by everybody.”

Art From Pencil to Stylus
Indian Wedding

Art gets Interactive

Slowly, design in digital was opening out and was exploring new ways of touching people. The design didn’t just involve the designer, but his audience as well. New media and installation art were new storytelling techniques. Tagging and annotating gave new dimensions to Art. “Suddenly so much more could be done.” He adds.

Art From Pencil to Stylus
Waiting

The Birth of the New Artist

“Equipped now with the latest gadgets, the artist was truly getting the best.” says Sachin. iPads and ‘apps’ for almost anything you wanted to do; from calligraphy to typography, were a finger click away. Everything was on the ‘cloud’ and the artist was now ‘virtual’.

Art From Pencil to Stylus
Daily Hard Work

So, Where Next?

Now is the time to think beyond. If you can imagine it, you can create it. There are endless possibilities and that should keep us all busy for a long time. But the trick today is to be open to the world and yet always do your own thing.

Published in Issue 20

Pencil or stylus? Paper or touch screen? This is just a start to the long list of questions that are swimming in every designer’s mind today. They say change is the only constant but has digitalisation really taken over the traditional methods? Would there be a time when the pencil will be forgotten forever like writers have forgotten a fountain pen?


We discuss the issue with famous Indian designers and try to understand what they think. This issue also has some very talented and unique designer like Sachin Puthran, Raghava KK, Ramanjeet Kaur and Pavan Rajurkar got featured along with much more. Mr. Xerty and Amrei Hofstatter came with unique interpretation in our MadeIn section.

 

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The enchanting portraits of Anna Dittmann evoke different emotions. It is a right blend of real emotions showcased in a dreamy, whimsical setting using delicate detailing with natural elements. Here, she gives us an insight into her creative process and discusses how one’s passion can be moulded to create striking designs.

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Oil
Enchanting Natural Portraits
Chalice

CG: Your illustrations are mystical portraits with delicate detailing which is heavily influenced by natural elements. What fascinates you to utilise these elements in your illustrations?

AD: I love the beauty and unpredictability of nature – it perfectly complements the human face. Most of my work consists of portraits because I enjoy depicting characters and emotions. I often draw inspiration from movement and organic shapes by fusing abstract natural elements. Environment evokes a sense of mystery which is very appealing. Therefore, I tend to create soft pieces with a combination of graphics and realistic elements.

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Spore
Enchanting Natural Portraits
Ink

CG: As a digital artist, what aspects of the tool attract you the most? Do you like to work in the traditional mediums as well?

AD: Digital art gives you the freedom to make as many studies/mistakes/finished pieces without wasting materials. When it comes to working with traditional mediums, I have recently enjoyed using pastels, watercolours, and oils for personal studies and I try to incorporate the textures of these to bring a spontaneous effect in my art created digitally too.

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Petal
Enchanting Natural Portraits
Camouflage

CG: What are the key points that you take into consideration when developing an idea into a design?

AD: With the portrait as the central aspect of my work, rendering and detailing facial features is the key. I love observing unique features and painting beauty that might not be traditional, but still striking. Through my art, I hope to inspire a sense of otherworldly beauty and mystery. The balance of a realistic figure within decorative surroundings is an aesthetic that I love and often try to apply to my work.

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Myriad
Enchanting Natural Portraits
Orb

CG: Your portraits illustrations are realistic and evoke emotions. How do you manage to do so? Are there any specific tools/ elements that you incorporate?

AD: Many of my portraits deal with liberation, release, and the search for a dream state. Perhaps because that’s what art is to me. Painting is therapeutic. I create my works digitally using Adobe Photoshop CS6 and my trusty Wacom Intuos 3 tablet. Mainly use a chalky brush throughout my process, as well as various watercolour textures that I’ve found and made for a traditional feel. Normally, I start with a vague concept in mind and sketch out my idea in black and white. After tweaking the composition, values, and being generally nitpicky, I start seeking out references and refining my sketch. Next, I start throwing in textures and add colour using layer modes. Toward the end, I detail the piece and call it a day.

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Dawn
Enchanting Natural Portraits
Bauhinia

CG: How has formal education in Art and Design helped your process or creations?

AD: I attended the Savannah College of Art and Design in Georgia and received my Illustration BFA in 2015. I loved being surrounded by creative people with a similar passion for art, who pushed, taught, and inspired me on a daily basis. I think the greatest benefit was learning more about the business side of illustration through my professors who had practical experience and making connections with other artists. However, I find that art school is really what you make of it and not entirely necessary for an artistic career (aside from those majors that require a degree). In the end, I feel that most growth occurs by the time and effort you’re willing to put in for improvement, as well as being driven by self-initiated projects.

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Tigress
Enchanting Natural Portraits
Duo

CG: How important is a colour palette in design?

AD: Over the years, my style has become more muted and monochromatic. I’m drawn to works that have colour restraints and which emphasises the atmosphere. Muted hues can often lead to greater balance and provide cohesion throughout a piece. There’s a delicate vintage quality that can result in limiting a colour palette. The colours I choose are inspired by flora, fauna (particularly insects), and other artworks. Even though I tend to start in black and white and prefer limited palettes, adding hue is my favourite step. After seeing an inspiring colour scheme, there’s nothing I want to do more than paint.

Enchanting Natural Portraits
The-Forgotten-Tale-of-Larsa
Enchanting Natural Portraits
Felis

CG: What aspect of illustrating excites you the most?

AD: I love everything about art and get very excited about every project I undertake. I love all the emotions that art evokes in me; it could be the rush when something is going well or the frustration of working for hours with no fruitful outcome. It is the thrill when I find a beautiful artwork, the overwhelming feeling that turns my frustration into inspiration. I consider myself so lucky that people have given me opportunities to create art both personally and professionally.

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Flood
Enchanting Natural Portraits
Fragment

CG: What is your advice to budding artists?

AD: When you love what you do, the process involved and the experience, it will definitely show in your work! Be disciplined; draw every day even if it is just a little sketch. Introspect and understand the elements that attracts you the most and what you personally enjoy creating. By doing so, your own voice will emerge. Look for possibilities and gain an online presence to showcase your work; never stop making lots of wonderful things (whatever that may mean to you).

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Soul Breather
Enchanting Natural Portraits
Beverley

Anna Dittmann

After graduating from Savannah College of Art and Design in Georgia, the freelance digital illustrator Anna Dittmann currently resides in Scotland. With a passion for portraiture, her work is mainly inspired from natural elements, mythology & history, movement & texture, lyrics & melodies, expressions and colour variations. Her clients, mainly from the book and comic cover market, include DC Comics, HarperCollins, Cirque du Soleil, ImagineFX, Titan Comics and 3D Total.


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Rocket Science owned by Rajesh Thomas and Vidya Thomas takes us through the creative process involved in its diverse film-making, and introduces us to the changing trends and their impacts in today’s times.

CG. What determines the kind of projects you’ll take?

RS. We take up projects that carry a challenge or scope to come up with something new. It gets a bit boring to repeat stuff that we have already explored before.

CG. What is the most important thing you’ll try to achieve across the films you make?

RS. An unexpected visual or experience that hooks you to a film is what we try to achieve across the films we do. We try out various renditions of telling a story. We explore various techniques that can bring about a story in an all-new perspective. Be it live action, animation or mixed media, there is always a new way to use it – that is what takes the film to another level and makes it interesting to watch.

CG. For commercial animations, how do you meet or manifest the client’s expectations, or how do you instead convince them of what you’ve created?

RS. It’s got a little easier these days to convince the clients to take up a non-traditional route to achieve something unique as they are going through tough competition, and all of them want to stand out and look different in the crowd. We go about a very detailed treatment presentation that elaborates almost every aspect of the outcome so that the client is in a loop with the end results that may come with it. There are still some surprises in store for the client as stop-motion and mixed media cannot be elaborated to its exact outcome. However, it has mostly been pleasant surprises.

Film Creation - Rocket Science Labs
AJIO.COM Film

CG. How do you guys decide the direction of the film, in terms of colours, script, screenplay and other such fundamentals?

RS. We really work hard and put a lot of our energies in how to make the film stand out in the treatment stage. There is this gut feeling that lets us narrow down on the route we would like to take. Once we are happy with a certain route, we elaborate on the execution in detail. The route, in most cases, sets itself to the colour code and mood for the film. Almost nothing is left to chance, as far as pre-production is concerned. Though most of our works are experimental in nature, we go in for very detailed pre-production to anticipate all the challenges that may arise during the shoot and post, and try and solve it beforehand.

Film Creation - Rocket Science Labs
Taste INDIA on a plate” TVC for Kohinoor

CG. What kinds of results and processes feel most satisfying in the overall practice of creating an animation film?

RS. Every stage of animation is a really interesting process. We have the character in mind, which then slowly begins to take shape and come alive. Once everything is put together, and that idea in mind starts playing out in reality, it is a surreal experience.

CG. What are your views about the current animation scenario, and in which direction do you feel it is heading?

RS. We are still loaded with a chunk of overly emotional stories playing-out in safe live-action formats, but there is a change taking place, slowly but surely. Clients and agencies are on a lookout for directors and production houses that can take their story to the next level of execution. Animation and mix media alongside emerging technologies will play a huge role in the upcoming years.

CG. How important you see short-films has become for everyone in the times of Youtube and Facebook? And where do you see the trend taking us?

RS. The current trend on social media is completely content-driven. Though no one comments on the execution, but behind-the-scenes videos have as many, or sometimes more, views than the commercial itself. People want to know where the thought process began, and the technology used to make the film. This means that they are opening up to experimentations, and are enjoying films – that is radical in approach. It is an encouraging trend and great times for filmmakers.

Issue 40-Motion Graphics Special

Published in Issue 40

We all have favourite TV shows and we passionately discuss the stories and characters of it. But sometimes, we tend to ignore the channel and its branding. Now with many different channels to choose from, we are experiencing many new branding overhauls to grab the audience’s attention. In this issue, we focused on Motion Graphics design and people behind some awesome channel rebrandings.


If you are interested in moving design or animated content then this issue is a must-read for you!


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