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Paper is a strong medium evoking something eternal. If used creatively, it can transcend flat expressions to reach an infinite space. Reflects pop-up artist Sachin George, as he talks about his design sensibilities in the craft.

Fantasy Stories - Paper Possibilities
Metropolis and City Planners

Drawing doesn’t fully exploit the potential of paper.

That’s when the discovery of paper engineering happened. The art was a perfect amalgamation of geometry, structures, and paper modelling. Experimenting with the possibilities of the medium pushed creativity to go beyond a double spread and do more and more with paper. What excited most was the magic that the output created. No electricity, no metal or screws or things that you have to plug in. It is so non-technical, and yet you get to make the magic happen with your hands.

Fantasy Stories - Paper Possibilities
Untitled experiments

Pop-ups fascinate the kid inside us. 

Just like animation and comics are loved by adults just as much as they are by the kids, pop-ups have a similar appeal when it comes to captivating the attention of a mature audience. The whole thrill of seeing a huge picture rise up between a normal spread and close itself back peacefully into the page is an exciting experience. It’s a pleasant surprise from regular prints on paper. Furthermore, the content and presentation bring the art closer to the imagination with a better look and narrative.

Fantasy Stories - Paper Possibilities
Metropolis and City Planners

Every story has a story behind it. 

In this art, everything begins with the visualisation. After working on pop-up structures over years continually, everything seems to pop up and shut back in dreams. Some of these went forward in the form of a book. These ideas come from daily life or certain incidents that occur. Therefore, every story has a story behind it. The craft gives the audience a taste of the backstory that gave birth to the idea. It all depends on how directly or discretely you depict that story. Nowadays, digital technology has fueled the production process. From die to make to laser cutting, such technological advancements have pushed intricacy and hence the structures. This gives us scope to think beyond the bizarre.

Fantasy Stories - Paper Possibilities
News updates

Your choices decide the narrative.

It’s important to know which elements to pop up and in what proportion in order to keep the flow of the narrative intact. This can be done in two ways. Either you pick a scene and make it memorable with structural possibilities or you take a memorable scene and give it one more reason to be remembered for. The choice is yours. Sometimes, pop-up art is not just about rising structures. There are various other factors that contribute to the storytelling process in the piece of art, like lights and shadows. They also have to be taken into account, especially when working with white. If you’re working with colours, it’s important to be aware of the fact that a lot is already happening within a spread. Therefore the colours chosen must be such that they do not clash with the structures.

Fantasy Stories - Paper Possibilities
Metropolis and City Planners
Fantasy Stories - Paper Possibilities
How long? How far?

Illustration skills matter up till the page.

Beyond that, it’s the ability to visualize the possible structure that you have in mind. It’s about thinking in 3D, which is the most challenging part in this form of art. That’s why, beyond the realm of the paper, the pencil quits and a paper cutter takes charge.

Fantasy Stories - Paper Possibilities
Untitled experiments
Fantasy Stories - Paper Possibilities
India Through Currencies

Pop-up is not Origami.

Origami is the traditional paper art of Japan and is different from pop-up art. Origami just involves the folding of paper to create static forms like a crane, dragon etc. whereas paper engineering is moving mechanics and all about folding, cutting and pasting to create structures.

Fantasy Stories - Paper Possibilities
The red fish

Published in Issue 04

The issue with the best insights from some of the top space designers and advertising tips from Happy Creatives with some exclusive mix of media experiments in type and digital art. The issue with the best insights from some of the top space designers and advertising tips from Happy Creatives with some exclusive mix of media experiments in type and digital art.

 

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Nature is blessed with a wonderful variety of things and one that captures the eyes of many are the animals. Created in various forms and having unique patterns, Richard Field, illustrates them in his own style using worldwide cultural influences. He elaborates on his nature inspired designs.

inspired
The Dark Owl.
inspired
The Travelling Turtle.

CG: What is the story behind what you do? How did you discover your talent and how did you work towards making it more than that? What were your inspirations? What were some challenges you had to overcome?

RF: Field-inspired, a play on the words ‘feel inspired’, is my name as an Illustrator. Having been inspired by so many things, it’s nice to do some inspiring of my own. My collection started when I was trying to make a bit of extra cash selling flash sheets to tattoo parlors around South London. Tattooists are always on the look out for new artwork to display in their shops. I used to work on black and white illustrations inspired by a variety of cultures around the world. My Native American, Mãori and folk art inspired illustrations caught the eye of a few people on Facebook and I decided to start adding colours and working on a new collection inspired by some of the nature’s most iconic animals.

inspired
The Bull.
inspired
The Stag Prince.

CG: Animals play a central role in your designs. Can you throw some more light as to why? How did you find inspiration in animals and their patterns?

RF: Isn’t wildlife the most wonderful thing we have on this planet? I’ve definitely chosen the best subject to illustrate. The shapes and patterns that it forms never cease to amaze me. It’s a great achievement to be able to put your own stamp on animals we see so often. I enjoy trying to add a bit of personality to them – the ‘Wise’ Lion or the ‘Truthful’ tiger. Nature is full of so much hidden beauty, the idea is to try to encourage people to take a closer look at the artwork and look beyond to read the halftones and patterns.

inspired
African Buffalo.
inspired
The Mountain Ram.

CG: Your designs have a striking contrast against black, creating an illuminated look and feel. How does that enhance the design?

RF: In my current collection, I work on black using a similar colour theme across all prints. By using strong, bold colours on black I hope to encourage the user to look closer at the detail. It’s not easy working on black, sometimes the colours can get a bit lost during the printing process – but I love the end result. Hopefully, people like how the artwork jumps off the canvas.

inspired
The African Elephant.
inspired
The Truthful Tiger.

Published in Issue 28

This Illustration Special is best to know why and how illustration as a popular medium is taking the design world by storm! From evolution of illustrations to its place in the world today, renowned designers and illustrators like Abhishek Singh, Mukesh Singh, Archan Nair, Alicia Souza, Raj Khatri with some international talent such as Fil Dunsky from Russia, Iain Macarthur and Richard Field from UK, who live and breathe illustration, would be the right people to gain some insight from. With many more talents to explore with great insights and excellent techniques, again a fully packed issue is waiting to amaze you!

 

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Veteran Illustrator and designer, Anant Kulkarni, takes us through a visual journey by illustrating and explaining how imagery is a powerful tool of communication. He describes how one can keep an audience intact and engaged through the still medium.

Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Ganesha Design 4
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Person
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Bird Typo
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Symmetrical Graphic design

CG. What is the main intention or idea you desire to achieve through your work?

AK. It is my responsibility to get as close as possible to the audience, communicating through visuals. So, I always keep myself engaged in creating visuals that are a part of my study, besides assignments. This practice really helps every creative person, whether a student or professional. I try to express my views through every picture, conveying the same message through different visual solutions and like to keep my audience engaged in the visuals, maintaining their curiosity. As every artist has his/her own way to express, in my case it is visuals, and visuals only. I look up to each day as a new challenge and start thinking of something new!

Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Ganesha Graphic Design 2
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Icons
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
All About by Anant Kulkarni
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Art Prints

CG. What role do aspects like geometry and symmetry play in your visual works?

AK. I’m always searching for new things to execute through visual forms. Geometrical design patterns are a part of my study – a technique developed over years of consistent practice. Though I don’t know much about technical geometry, except the basic shapes such as circles, squares, triangles, hexagons, lines etc. provoke me to explore them in all possible combinations. I started creating very simple forms, and it became a habit while trying to convert objects into forms, using geometrical shapes. Symmetry and asymmetry are principles of design, but I ignore these terminologies while working, as they may disturb my visual thought.

Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Food Typo
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Icons
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Visual Language.
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Ganesha Graphic Design

CG. How do you choose your colours and apply them to be balanced across geometric patterns?

AK. Visual concepts and drafting are very important; colours come later. The use of colour has its own purpose, and it depends on various factors. Of course, it is a choice of the artist, as to which colours to choose as per the concept. If you observe, a lot of famous artists can be identified through their colour palette. The use of colours helps to enhance the beauty of your visuals. Some artists use and apply particular colours to convey messages and create moods. I try to keep my designs bright, eye-catching and more attractive, but I give maximum attention to the visual form. The only care I take while using colour is to not disturb the image.

Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
City Life
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Parrots
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Scary Sketchbook
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Ganesha Graphic Design 3
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Bird Typo 2

CG. What, and how much, does proportion contribute to what you wish to execute?

AK. Proportions, in my illustration and compositions, play a vital role. They are a part of design principles, too. When I plan composition, I always think of it as a sequence – “What is going to be seen first? ‘What has more emphasis?’ I then think of other related visuals that would keep the audience engaged through the entire picture. Harmony, movement, and size of the forms are other important aspects of design.

Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Mug Design Applications
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Crockery Design Applications
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Tag Design Applications
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
T-shirt Design Applications
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Coasters

CG. How necessary is the white of the background in your illustrations?

AK. It is very important. Positive and negative spaces are the two main important aspects of every composition. This helps you enhance and beautify your image. Leaving white spaces in design, or any picture or composition gives relief to the viewer to grasp the image very easily. White spaces help a lot in finding out the subject in a clear manner, even in text, if you have proper spacing; it helps in reading more comfortably. In the end, it provides the all-important visual comfort.

Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Pencil Typo
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Bags

Cover Designed for Issue 39

As the festivity is all around, every brand or business is trying to impress the Indian audience. But what really works for us Indians? What is an Indian design? And how we can make designs for India? To understand it, we interviewed some Indian creatives who are successfully creating designs for the Indian audience. This issue of Creative Gaga is a light read for someone looking for inspirations or insights on Indian design and how the Indian audience can be enticed. So go ahead and order your copy or subscribe if you want to keep receiving a regular dose inspirations!

 

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Freelance illustrator, Pratima Unde, takes us on a journey of depicting human emotions on canvas. She thereby describes and provides insight on how it requires one to dive into the depths of the subject’s personality, so as to be able to aptly and accurately represent it.

Emotions
Monk.

CG. What fascinates you most about human expressions that you seem to choose them as your prime subjects?

PU. Even if you don’t know an individual personally, you can decipher a lot about that person just by looking at his or her face. Every day in our lives, we see hundreds of faces; each person wears a mask. But, if we get out of our own little selfish world and look carefully, the mask will disappear, and we’ll see a range of emotions on the person’s face – right from pain to happiness. I like taking off those masks through my illustrations.

Emotions
The Couple.

CG. What is your main intention that you wish to achieve or convey through your work?

PU. I try to bring out the emotions people go through; ones they subconsciously engage in, and which do not easily or readily show on their faces and in their expressions. The subjects I approach are very shy and prefer to keep everything to themselves, much like a secret or personal indulgence. I speak for them through my illustrations, bringing out what lays unsaid or unexpressed.

Emotions
Naughtiest.

CG. What are the most challenging aspects of portraying human emotions?

PU. People go through umpteen numbers of emotions, not only through the course of the whole day but also at single points of time. To select the one emotion that dominates or overshadows the others is a little tricky. I sometimes spend days observing the subjects, before I start to illustrate. It requires one to look beneath the surface and gauge at what lies underneath – just like an iceberg. That is the beauty and challenge of it – or, you can say, the beauty lies in the challenge.

Emotions
The Couple.

CG. How do you achieve representing your subjects wholly on the canvas?

PU. I usually sit face-to-face with my subjects and spend days with them. There’s always something new that I see in them each and every day – it’s like diving into the depth of the sea, inching deeper and deeper. A wrinkle, tear or smile can say a lot. So, I usually start with a rough sketch, using different mediums. I then keep making changes, until I’m completely confident and satisfied with what I’ve manifested on the canvas, is a true representation of the person.

Emotions
Addiction.

CG. What is the idea behind the textures you choose in your illustrations?

PU. ‘Giggling’ is the technique I use to highlight the facial expressions. I start with a simple dot that turns into a line which never ends. By going in a circular motion, I never actually realise where the line started, and where it ended. This style helps me provide a great amount of detailing to the illustration. It also helps me go in-depth to bring out their personalities precisely.

Emotions
The Villager.

CG. What do you enjoy most, in your work process?

PU. The final result is what I enjoy most about my work! I love it when people understand and relate or connect to my work. Conveying a lot about a person just through a glance is what I want to achieve through all my illustrations. When that happens, I feel happiness.

Emotions
Surprised.

CG. What would be your advice to others who wish to involve in a similar style of work as yours?

PU. Don’t try to emulate someone else, but choose a style that is solely yours, instead. That way, the work you create through it will be your personal best and most satisfying. Only you can create and execute your own trademark style. Trust me!

Emotions
Mother.
Emotions
Joyous Rajasthani.

Published in Issue 39

As the festivity is all around, every brand or business is trying to impress the Indian audience. But what really works for us Indians? What is an Indian design? And how we can make designs for India? To understand it, we interviewed some Indian creatives who are successfully creating designs for the Indian audience. Neha Tulisan, the founder of NH1 design, highlights to understand how we Indians live; how we grew up; and what moves us emotionally. Whereas Mira Malhotra, founder of Studio Khol, emphasises on the difference of Western and Indian Sensibilities. Also, we support keeping ourselves connected with Indian cultures, languages, history, aspirations and more, will help find the Indian context in everything we create. This issue of Creative Gaga is a light read for someone looking for inspirations or insights on Indian design and how the Indian audience can be enticed. So go ahead and order your copy or subscribe if you want to keep receiving a regular dose of inspirations!

 

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Richard Field

Inspired by the beauty of the world around, Richard Field is an Illustrator from United Kingdom. In his latest collection, he puts his own stamp on some of the world’s most beautiful animals using layers of vector patterns and halftones.


Featured In


This Illustration Special is best to know why and how illustration as a popular medium is taking the design world by storm! From evolution of illustrations to its place in the world today, renowned designers and illustrators like Abhishek Singh, Mukesh Singh, Archan Nair, Alicia Souza, Raj Khatri with some international talent such as Fil Dunsky from Russia, Iain Macarthur and Richard Field from UK, who live and breathe illustration, would be the right people to gain some insight from. With many more talents to explore with great insights and excellent techniques, again a fully packed issue is waiting to amaze you!

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In this technologically driven world, it is sometimes refreshing to admire design that is inspired from things that have been forgotten. Using paper as a canvas as well as a tool, Yulia Brodskaya captures old age in a unique and trendy manner. In conversation with Creative Gaga, she throws light on her style and inspirations.

Paper Illustrations
Amethyst

CG: You’ve worked with internationally renowned personalities and brands. Briefly, take us through your design journey. The tough times, the easy times. What made you take up designing as a profession? How did ‘paper illustrations’ come about?

YB: Even with a background in graphic design, I always have a tendency to work with hand-made styles, especially paper. I started to use the edge-glued paper technique more than 6 years ago. I prefer not to call it quilling as it’s more about drawing with paper rather than on it. Slowly and steadily experimenting with the art form has allowed me to make quilling more stylish and modern.

Paper Illustrations
Joy.
Paper Illustrations
CADBURY.

CG: Lines and patterns seem to be common among most of your designs. Is there a reason or is just simply your style? Why the ‘old’ faces? What is your style and design process?

YB: Many motifs/elements come from the medium e.g. a coil is a natural thing to do with a paper strip, but I try to use a variety of paper elements including flat-cut paper sculpture, decoupage etc. just to keep the art visually interesting and diverse.

Paper Illustrations
GYPSY.

Like every designer occupies a particular niche, my designs express and depict old age. Merging the edge-glued paper strips technique to depict wrinkles enhances the experience both for the designer and the viewers.

Paper Illustrations
GODIVA.
Paper Illustrations
KING OF SPADES.

CG: What do you feel are three things that an illustrator must have in today’s competitive environment? How do you evolve and keep up with changes that happen around?

YB: First is paper, then glue and finally a pair of scissors! On a serious note, an illustrator should stay true to his/her own style but at the same time keep experimenting and changing it slightly over time. This is a natural process and most of the time undergoes a subconscious change.

Paper Illustrations
Lovesdoves
Paper Illustrations
HEADSCARF.

CG: Is there any cultural influence in your designs? How do you manage to give an ‘international appeal’ to your designs?

YB: There is no cultural influence unless it’s a particular project that demands a particular look and feel. My influences are typography, paper, nature, and colours – things that are pretty much universal and appeal to everyone

Paper Illustrations
BABUSHKA.
Paper Illustrations
NOEL.

CG: What are your inspirations? Any tips for talented designers that are waiting to be recognised?

YB: Like mentioned earlier, anything that occurs in nature is what appeals and inspires. Everything from interesting texture to unique colours can be a starting point for a new idea. And as far as the motto goes, it’s doing what you love and loving what you do.

Paper Illustrations
WHERE WISHES COME TRUE.
Paper Illustrations
BLACKWHITE COLOUR.

Published in Issue 27

This issue explores one of the widely discussed product design and automobile #design which is very close to our heart. We spoke to few leading names to find out the future of product design and understand the Indian designer sensibilities and practices. Everyone believe that it’s not just functionality but also the visual appeal of the product which plays a crucial in the success of a product. This issue is a bundle of inspirations and insights from the well know product and automobile designers. A must read which you will enjoy for sure.

 

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Packaging has been for long an ignored discipline of design. But the trend has changed nowadays, and it is becoming an exciting space for designers to showcase their artistic and innovative skills. Graphic design studio, Impprintz, derives inspiration from the products to add to the experience of the buyer and user. Here, Simran Sahi and Rahul Sureka talk to Creative Gaga about how they successful packaging!

successful packaging
Massage Oil Boxes.

CG: Your designs seem to follow a geometric formula and are pretty systematically arranged. Is that your design style, or does packaging follow a standard formula that clients ask you to apply?

IMP: The idea is to keep things simple yet delightful. With packaging, it’s not an anomaly to face a series of variants within the same product range. Therefore, the challenge lies in creating something different while maintaining a strong cohesive visual family. Another vital element for packaging designers to be mindful of is information architecture which helps buyers navigate systematically through the communication.

successful packaging
Incense Gift Packs.
successful packaging
Incense Gift Packs.

CG: According to you, what makes a successful packaging design? You use a varied sense of bright and attractive motifs. Is that what you feel makes a product stand out on a shelf with other competitive brands?

IMP: The inspiration for packaging is more or less derived from the product and its unique attributes. Packaging design can be successful on various levels and often requires a combination of attributes like its ability to attract, engage and inform. Simultaneously, it must also deliver a tactile experience with the apt choice of material and optimum fabrication, a well-thought-out functionality, and the difference and joy in it. Of course, the well-designed and attractive packaging on the shelf is going to grab your attention.

successful packaging
Pondicherry Collection Incense.
successful packaging
Pondicherry Collection Incense.

CG: How is packaging different in today’s times? Apart from just a pack that people throw away, how do you get your designs to serve a greater purpose? Or is the purpose only to lure people and then packaging design loses its purpose as soon as the product is purchased?

IMP: The primary purpose of any successful packaging is to protect the product. By using vibrant and positive colour schemes, artistic illustrations and imagery and durable materials, packaging can prove to be an informative, enriching and an educative experience even in the process of selling/buying the product.

successful packaging
Indigenous organic boxer shorts.

CG: How is packaging for an incense stick different from say, a bottle? Do you believe it’s the same thought process and concepts that need to be exercised or does packaging design vary from project to project?

IMP: In terms of process, all packaging design projects begin with a similar set of questions and critical analysis, but then they begin to take shape within their own parameters. Each project has its unique requirements, vision, communication, market segment, timelines and fabrication possibilities. What never changes is the spirit to deliver the best; more than what the client asks for.

successful packaging
Special Incense Packs.

CG: And finally, what advice would you give people who want to take up packaging design and make a difference?

IMP: Packaging design is a field in itself. It is a container of creative storytelling where two-dimensional design meets the third dimension. It is important to promote people, products, and concepts that you believe in. Keep trying new methods and ideas; there is always more to learn.

successful packaging
Mason & Co chocolate bars.
successful packaging
Mason & Co chocolate bars.

Published in Issue 26

Packaging is the first vital step towards enchanting the audience. Who doesn’t like a cute box or a trendy bottle? With this issue, Creative Gaga lets the cat out of the box to reveal the world of packaging design. Featuring various local and international designers like Petar Pavlov from Macedonia and Brandziac from Russia, Elephant Design and Impprintz from Pune, the issue promises to be a keepsake for many.

 

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Yulia Broskaya

Yulia Brodskaya is a paper artist and illustrator from the UK. She uses cut and bent paper strips to make vibrant 3D paper artworks. Starting off as a graphic designer, she gave up on computer programs to instead work with something as natural as paper. She has worked on more than hundred high end projects over the last six years.


Featured In


This issue explores one of the widely discussed product design and automobile #design which is very close to our heart. We spoke to few leading names to find out the future of product design and understand the Indian designer sensibilities and practices. Everyone believes that it’s not just functionality but also the visual appeal of the product which plays a crucial in the success of a product. This issue is a bundle of inspirations and insights from the well-known product and automobile designers. A must read which you will enjoy for sure.

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Colours can paint a good picture or spoil it altogether, literally. Graphic Designer, Meroo Seth, speaks about and elaborates upon her approach towards finding the essential colour combination in sync with the remaining elements of her work.

Meroo Seth
Get Grubs Takeaway Bags.
Meroo Seth
Get Grubs Packaging Design.
Meroo Seth
Get Grubs Stationary design.

To connect is the calling.

Design plays a huge role in Meroo’s life; it’s a voice through which she finds expression. It not only makes her look at things differently but also manages to play with her opinions. Communicating complicated ideas simply; connecting with people, and making the world a beautiful place through appealing visuals is what spurs her. No doubt, she takes to an approach of fun, curiosity, happiness, and playfulness when working on her illustrations. She’s more than happy if her work can bring about a sense of delight in people, making them feel something good while solving problems as well.

Meroo Seth

Finding your own palette.

Colour sense comes with experience and the trial-and-error of playing with different sets of colours. She has seen her own colour palettes changing and evolving with time. Conversations with friends and strangers; meeting new people, and being open to new experiences are like finding a new colour palette, to Meroo. The process of building an unusual bridge between different observations and associations triggers insights and inspiration within her. According to her, emotion is the most important factor to consider while creating balanced colour palettes. That is why she avoids overusing a colour, while, many-a-times, the colour itself inspires her to create the design.

Meroo Seth
Making salad together.

Creating the balance.

Colour is a powerful and important communication tool and is tied to religious, cultural, political and social influences. So, it’s not enough for a designer to use a colour merely because one likes it.

Meroo Seth
Alphabet G Mug.
Meroo Seth
Alphabet M Mug.

Colours communicate various meaning; even all colours combinations signify differently, evoking varied emotions and feelings when paired with another colour. So, she believes it’s very important that elements in the composition balance weight. For example, the thickness of a form, colour, texture and the kind of forms should also have a consistent style they follow. Sometimes, the form cannot say it all; the use and amount of colours then play an even more important role in communicating the idea.

Meroo Seth
Cavaya Fine Dine Menu.
Meroo Seth
Cavaya Fine Dine stationary.

Harmonising elements.

Meroo firmly trusts that everything and everyone supports and relies on one another and that it applies in the case of colours too. Each colour change relies on what the rest of the colours and elements are. The shades and tones can be played amongst each other to provide an appealing look while balancing the elements of the composition.

Meroo Seth
Food posters.
Meroo Seth
Eating Together.

At times, she isolates a colour to give it focus, so as to create a totally unique impact. Likewise, she also plays with light and shade to create an interesting mood. While choosing a colour palette, she comes up with a few keywords the palette should reflect when creating a mood board for a particular subject – for example, ‘happy, fun and bold’. Now, that’s sure to spread some smiles.

Meroo Seth
Best Friends.
Meroo Seth
Coffee cups for The Hangout Café.

Published in Issue 35

The season of the festival has started and everyone is preparing to have a unique one this time with less cash and more fun. We interview many creatives who creates promotional or calendar design each year. As most of the thing around us had shifted to digital, even calendar design and the promotion has shifted. But Yorick Pintos, a strategic consultant at studio Kohl suggests that best option would be a mix of both. If you are interested in print design & want to understand the future of the same. So, go ahead and order your latest issue copy!

 

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