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Mohor Ray, co-founder of Codesign, explains the two most fundamental and key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer

Usually, an interview is a conversation that begins almost always at the portfolio and then meanders to understand intention, clarity, and commitment behind the showcased work and person behind the work. There are two things that stand out beyond the basics:

Firstly, originality.

It might sound almost obvious, but the originality of thought and craft is not as common as one would (and should) expect. The originality of thought is a strong, unique approach to a problem or context, while originality of craft demonstrates proficiency with basic skills to create a unique aesthetic approach. Originality establishes that the designer has internalised the fundamental and foundational aspects of a design process, and is now able to create his/her own unique approaches.

All design is problem-solving, but it is the original ingenuity of some that stand out. As a practice, I am concerned not only with the quality of output but also how distinct and differentiated it is.

Secondly, creative ability.

The ability to think and work across media and contexts, seamlessly. This will be the norm and not a good-to-have in the immediate future. While specialisations and specialists will continue to be significant in a time of growing creative collations, it will also warrant designers who are able to move between media seamlessly in the pursuit of impactful and meaningful design solutions.

Media, both new and old, rarely exists in vacuum, and to match integrated experiences that we now live as consumers, designers too will need to think ‘integrated’ from day one.

Published in Issue 38

This issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

 

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Sometimes, unplanned things happen to be the most cherished. Like a work of art that is created with no distinctive thoughts or direction. Employing this random tool in her designs, Rohina Thapar gives us a glimpse into her black and white free-flowing world.

Rohina Thapar - Free flowing
ELEPHANT FISH WITH A CRANE.
Rohina Thapar - Free flowing
CATERPILLAR LADIES.

Like a flowing string of spaghetti, Rohina makes use of the timeless combination of black and white, to create designs dictated by spontaneity and randomness. Unique in her approach, most of her designs have no justification or meaning behind it. Rohina chooses to go with the flow of lines, letting them bring out the final form, before jumping in to steer it into a conscious dimension. The presence of rhythm and surreal thoughts and elements in her creations, offer a sense of completion even with the absence of colour.

Rohina Thapar - Free flowing
FLYING FICTIONAL DAME.

Published in Issue 22

This issue is dedicated to the talented design graduates who are not just looking to work but seeking experience in order to realise the greater goal of life. The issue features various designers from India and abroad. Kevin Roodhorst from The Netherlands realised his goal so early in life that propelled him to start his career as a designer as young as 13. To name a few talents we have Vivek Nag from Fine Arts from Rachna Sansad Mumbai, Simran Nanda from Pearl Academy New Delhi, Anisha Raj from MAEER MIT Institute of Design Pune, Giby Joseph from Animation and Art School Goa and many more. This issue gives a fresh perspective of talented graduates and their unique approach to design.

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NH1 Design
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An integrated branding consultancy, with a core purpose to make people love the client’s brand. NH1 Design has proved it by launching a notebook brand to launching the biggest women’s hospital in India, from designing a new lingerie brand to launching a digital home-made food venture, from chocolate to real estate.


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The Design in 2020! Each year starts with many predictions, anticipations and a lot of hope for bad things to go out and good things to come in our life. The year 2020 has already started with eventful initial months and may hold more surprises in coming times. To understand what’s coming from the design perspective, we featured some of the best design projects from last year. Also discussed a few broad questions like how minimalism will affect our designs or what all an illustrator to keep in mind to be successful and much more.
Each year around this time, many fresh young talented designers come out as design graduates to join the best of studios and agencies. Despite many find the perfect fit for their talent but still majority faces many dilemmas and questions. So with this issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

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All of us get excited when we are able to take a step or have a gaze into the past from the vantage point of the present. And, so, there are all sorts and kinds of museums that we find to be existing around the world – museums of war; museums of wildlife, the eminent lives of celebrated leaders; famous personalities, various pre-existing and current tribes, so on and so forth. However, as part of its packaging innovation division, Manjushree Technopack Ltd established a rather unique form of museum in the year 2003 – a museum that showcases the evolution in packaging that has undergone various alterations, revisions and transformations with the shifts in time.

packaging
packaging

A brainchild of Mr.Vimal Kedia, Managing Director at Manjushree Technopack Ltd, the museum is a result of his passion for packaging technology. The range of the collection that has been gathered and put on display over here attracts FMCG packaging experts and layman enthusiasts to study the gradual progression of packaging designs and the changing consumer needs. It thus serves as an essential assortment, one that provides a view into the transition of the selling of goods and ‘consumer behaviour’ through the decades, unto the global desire for more environmentally sustainable packaging that is required as of today.

packaging

Reminding visitors of the times during their childhood, curious collectables from the yesteryears have been put up to be the exhibit in a rather pristine condition. Gramophone records of Lata Mangeshkar, packed in two-colour printed paper board; tin cases of Cadbury Fry chocolate; huge, hot cases with space for hot coal; velvet-lined cutlery kits and lab tool cases; metal body cameras, cased in leather; wood-finish radios – it is all there to find amongst the 2000 items that give you a perspective on the sea of change that has taken place in the world of consumer goods packaging.

packaging
Tin Boxes Parachute Oil, Ponds Powder, Hershey's Cocoa and Tata Cafe
packaging
Radio
packaging

Beginning from wood casing in the 1900s, packaging moved to metal; then to glass, paper, cardboard, and to plastic containers today. And, so it continues to keep changing to be more and better ecological. Today, marketing managers of various top brands visit the museum to understand the legacy of their brands in the years gone by – for instance, the gold-plated spoon offered by Nescafe during its early days of promotion in the Middle East. Now, that kind of a freebie is not something we see anymore, is it!

packaging
Amul and Lactogen Tin boxes
packaging
Cadbury's Tin Box

Margeza

Margeza is a unique Design Studio founded and run by Hungary-born, Belgian couple. In love with various contemporary art having “ideas”behind them, they find their expression in the creative process of designing, building and furnishing apartments.

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