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Pankaj Bhambri

Undergoing Graduate Diploma in Creative technologies at Media Design School, Auckland and has done Bachelors in Communication Design. Currently, Pankaj Bhambri specialising in Illustration and Animation from Symbiosis Institute of Design, Pune.


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Traditional vs. digital; it’s the debate of the century. According to young illustrator, Pavan Dashrath Rajurkar, both are winners. Believing that both are like sides of the same coin, he tells us why it’s impossible to do without the other.

Traditional vs. Digital
Fish market
Traditional vs. Digital
Smoker

Knowing how to draw is most important.

Drawing is an art which will fade with time if one does not practice it regularly. It’s important to constantly keep in touch with that skill because the mind is directly connected to the hands. Nothing can create something as raw as the hands. Tools are used for getting different outputs while one is drawing, and design software is simply one of those tools. One shouldn’t feel any less if one does not know it.

Traditional vs. Digital
Red life
Traditional vs. Digital
The bird

Digitalisation adds another dimension to design, that’s time.

Digitalisation is the need of today. It can’t be ignored. It has enabled designers to increase output, where they can create multiple options in less time. Everything evolves with time and so has designed. Being a designer twenty years ago would mean facing greater difficulties in finding a platform and exposure as compared to today. In those days the process of artistic growth would have been really slow. We should make the most of the available sources.

Traditional vs. Digital
Bappanshi Gappa
Traditional vs. Digital
Krishna

Formal education sets in you a process that helps you approach your design.

It’s what they teach in all schools- research the subject before you romance it. An artwork starts from collecting a brief about it. It gives one the understanding to be able to visualise in context. India’s education doesn’t introduce technology right at the beginning, fearing that students will become dependent on it and won’t realise their own potential. A good example is how mental math is preferred over the use of a calculator in schools even today. Similarly, many designers today need a pencil and paper to sketch rough ideas and brainstorm. It’s a healthy habit. Finally, when you have the basic structure and elements of your design, you can work with technology, imparting flexibility and variation to your design.

Traditional vs. Digital
Pandit.
Traditional vs. Digital

Inspirations are not all.

Not just Indian, but even international designers are drawn to seek inspirations from our rich history, mythological stories, beautiful architecture and mesmerizing illustration styles. Taking these things as a base, many creative experiments can be undertaken and few have and are taking place. But unfortunately, many talented folks in India fail to receive a good platform for their work. The unfortunate reality is that many artists are lost due to lack of exposure. Hopefully, we will see that change soon.

Traditional vs. Digital
Shiva
Traditional vs. Digital

Published in Issue 20

Pencil or stylus? Paper or touch screen? This is just a start to the long list of questions that are swimming in every designer’s mind today. They say change is the only constant but has digitalisation really taken over the traditional methods? Would there be a time when the pencil will be forgotten forever like writers have forgotten a fountain pen? We discuss the issue with famous Indian designers and try to understand what they think. This issue also has some very talented and unique designer like Sachin Puthran, Raghava KK, Ramanjeet Kaur and Pavan Rajurkar got featured along with much more. Mr. Xerty and Amrei Hofstatter came with unique interpretation in our MadeIn section.

 

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The Netherlands might be below sea level, but it’s pretty high up when it comes to design. Inspired by the 20th-century movements, the designs of graphic designer and illustrator Lucky Dubz Trifonas, combine future elements to revolutionise the design world today. He offers us a sneak peek into his world of design.

LuckyTrifonas, 20th-century
Real Tone Records
LuckyTrifonas, 20th-century
Benji B.

CG: Most of your designs are built around a ‘face’. Any reason why the face is the centre of your design?

LD: Yes, The human face and body (in combination with typography) is one of the biggest challenges for me to work on. It works for me because it enables me to impart my soul into my design. The face in my work represents the human soul. I try to create the face as though staring you in the eye so that a strong connection can be established with the viewer.

LuckyTrifonas, 20th-century
Donuts
LuckyTrifonas, 20th-century
Tribe

CG: Your designs seem to be very loud and expressive. Is that your design style? What do you always try and communicate through your designs?

LD: I used to do a lot of graffiti back in the days and the colours I use, especially the complimentary ones, descend from that era. Call it an old habit. It helps me fuse a bit of myself even in my commercial projects where I am always telling the story of the client, or the story I want him to tell. In my free work, for example, Donutboy, I like to visualise social criticism, dark humor, and rebellious yet justified views. But I also like to work with darker colours, depending on what mood I want to communicate.

LuckyTrifonas, 20th-century
Black & White
LuckyTrifonas, 20th-century
Nouvelle Donuts

CG: What local inspirations do you incorporate in your designs? Any foreign inspirations involved?

LD: My designs are inspired by the early 20th-century movements such as Art Nouveau, Art Deco, Bauhaus, futurism, and pop art. As I mentioned above, I used to observe graffiti and street art when I was younger. I always tried not to look very deep at every work as I wanted to avoid possible unconscious rip offs. It’s important to constantly develop and evolve style with every project.

LuckyTrifonas, 20th-century
Dance Release
LuckyTrifonas, 20th-century
Strange Fruit

CG: You seem to make extensive use of bright colours and patterns. Would your designs mean something different in black and white?

LD: Well, the concept and meaning would remain the same. However, if you remove the colour then you are removing the emotional response from it. Not to say that black and white don’t evoke any emotions. Design in black and white enables one to see the pure form without any colourful tricks or deceptions. I have recently started an illustrated black and white type project called AlphaBetty where I illustrate all 26 letters as representing a girl’s name.

LuckyTrifonas, 20th-century
Bumpeez
LuckyTrifonas, 20th-century
Got Me Puzzled

CG: How would you describe design culture in Netherlands as compared to the rest of the world?

LD: Holland has a very high design standard. Especially when it comes to typography and graphic design. Nowadays, old fashion and the traditional forms (i.e. 20th-century) are being pushed back to make room for modern beautiful forms and shapes. You could say it’s a design revolution that’s taking place due to the multi cultural society and its diversity. Especially in Rotterdam where my studio is based.

LuckyTrifonas, 20th-century
Donutboy Worldwide. Ain’t no half steppin’
LuckyTrifonas, 20th-century
Footstool for crazy feet

CG: As a designer, are you motivated by the past or inspired by the future? How much study goes into your designs before it actually arrives at a final stage?

LD: I always try to mix my 20th-century inspired designs with future elements to bring an eclectic mix. When creating a design, I always start at the drawing board and sketch for many hours till I find the right shape and form. This is followed by outlining the artwork and scanning it so that I can colour and trace the design on the computer. It’s a good feeling to see a handmade design with a powerful outline, especially with faces and typography.

The colouring of the artwork is the most time consuming and on an average, it takes 2 to 4 days to complete a design. For example, the cover design for this issue took me 4 days. I experimented with syrup on paper to find the right form and shape for the letter ‘g’ and redesigned it in Illustrator. The letter rests on mud and grass, accentuating its shape and representing the floating world. The letter ‘g’, which was coloured using Photoshop and Illustrator, represents the river Ganga, that is a lifeline for millions of Indians who live along its course and depend on it for their daily needs.

LuckyTrifonas, 20th-century
Heartbreak
LuckyTrifonas, 20th-century
Colour the World

Published in Issue 19

A typography special, made up of not only Indian type designers or designers whose first love is type, but also few very talented international designers who open a totally new playground with sharing their insights and inspirations. This issue has exclusive interviews with Lucky Dubz Trifonas from Netherlands, Indian UI & type designer Sabareesh Ravi and Shiva Nallaperumal, who believes, type designers are the material providers to all the creative professionals. Also, includes a special making of Nirlep rebranding done by Elephant Design and an interaction with the ace product designer Aman Sadana.

 

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Lucky Dubz Trifonas

A graduate from Willem de Kooning Academy, Lucky Dubz Trifonas is a Rotterdam-based illustrator and graphic designer. Known for visualising concepts into handcrafted characters, human forms and typography, he has worked for international giants like MTV, Nickelodeon, Puma among others.


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A typography special, made up of not only Indian type designers or designers whose first love is type, but also few very talented international designers who open a totally new playground with sharing their insights and inspirations. This issue has exclusive interviews with Lucky Dubz Trifonas from Netherlands, Indian UI & type designer Sabareesh Ravi and Shiva Nallaperumal, who believes, type designers are the material providers to all the creative professionals. Also, includes a special making of Nirlep rebranding done by Elephant Design and an interaction with the ace product designer Aman Sadana.

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In this Advanced Photoshop tutorial, Kevin Roodhorst shows you step by step how this Astronaut Photo Manipulation is made. Someone even decided to have this as a huge tattoo on his arm!

 

Kevin Roodhorst a 26-year-old digital artist/retoucher from Almere, The Netherlands, specialized in high-end creative imaging and editorial/commercial advertising.

 

• HARDWARE/SOFTWARE USED

 

Wacom Intuos
– Eizo 27inch Screen,
– Photoshop CC 2017

 

• STOCKPHOTO CREDITS
Shutterstock

More From Kevin

As people realise the creative hard work behind beautiful packs, this field is getting innovative.

 

Packaging design plays an important role in the success of any brand or product. The goal of an inspiring packaging design is to turn projects into collectable and saleable items. It has to have strong visual appealing to stand out of the competition.

 

So, we have selected 20 best innovative & inspiring packaging designs, which will not just motivate you to create appealing designs but also give you update on current packaging trends.

1. Pen Packaging

Designed by: Wingyang

2. The Best Tea Time of the Day

Designed by: a.Design

3. Manjoor Estate’s

Inspiring Packaging

Designed by: Isabela Rodrigues

4. Paper Boat

Inspiring Packaging

Designed by: Elephant Design

5. Olio D’oliva

Designed by: Alessia Sistori

6. Topshape

Inspiring Packaging

Designed by: Sweety & Co

7. ACH vegan chocolate/ Limited edition

Designed by: Gintare Marcin

8. Kraftig

Inspiring Packaging

Designed by: Isabela Rodrigues

9. PANGÆA

Source: Behance

10. Packed like Sardines

Designed by: Brandiziac

11. Aphrodite’s

Inspiring Packaging

Designed by: Midday Studio

12. Flour Beverage – Sattu

Inspiring Packaging

Designed by: Vikash Raj

13. Le chocolat des Français

Source: Pinterest

14. Motif Wine

Designed by: EN GARDE

15. Filirea Gi Wine

Inspiring Packaging

Designed by: Christos Zafeiriadis

16. Exotic Coffee Collection

Inspiring Packaging

Designed by: ARTEMOV ARTEL

17. Smoker’s Teeth

Inspiring Packaging

Source: Pinterest

18. ASAP

Inspiring Packaging

Designed by: Elephant Design

19. Pasta Packaging

Designed by: Nikita Konkin

20. Milko

Inspiring Packaging

Designed by: Giovani Flores

Vinod Wakkchare

Mumbai based fashion and lifestyle photographer Vinod Wakkchare assisted Mr. Atul Kasbekar, before deciding to fly solo. He has worked with many famous Indian fashion designers and celebrities.


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Illustrator, Pracheta Banerjee, believes that if the fire within keeps burning, one will find their own unique way and style. With that, she stays true to her fondness for the eerie kind of beauty, and finds expression in showcasing deep emotions of characters in dark settings or environments.

Pracheta Banerjee - Beauty
Rhea and Sagittarius. Alternate depiction to the origin of Sagittarius, where he leaves his jealous wife, Rhea and becomes a centaur to escape her.

Dark is deep.

Pracheta is obsessed with the eerie side of beauty. For her, it leaves a heavy and mysterious impact, making one curious about the unknown while demanding the most attention. Her works are inspired from Greek Mythology to even basic human emotions, and have a lot of symbols and historic references, or may just be direct. She generally surrounds the character with elements that strongly convey their internal state or sentiment. Colours, in the process, have astrological references. There are certain aspects she highlights most while colouring, such as the eyes – some people’s intentions can be seen very clearly just by looking into their eyes. Likewise, if the lighting is strong, it adds a heavy impact to the entire painting, she feels.

Pracheta Banerjee - Beauty
Lalaax. Basic brushes were used for the entire painting, except for the dragon, which has been painted from scratch along with self made textures.

Creating the space for fresh thoughts.

Always exploring ways to convey stories through her works with as fewer boundaries as possible, there are times when she’s just unable to get the work done. That’s when she starts fresh and gets back with a clear vision of what she wants to do. It helps to come back to the drawing board, refreshed and renewed, so as to be able to see things clearly. By exploring and being open to more new ideas, one can truly grow and find more answers in the process. It is important to actually feel or ‘be there’ on the scene, so as to express something.

Pracheta Banerjee - Beauty
Ornithophobia. A depiction of the fear of birds.
Pracheta Banerjee - Beauty
Original Character. Remake of an older piece of work.

To keep looking for beauty is vital.

She paints from memory, which requires a lot of photo studies and understanding of how it works, or from references, depending on the effect to be achieved. One has to take a break from time to time, and plan out a composition and work from memory; by this, the mind keeps on looking for new information. It keeps challenging the mind, and one may patch that up by looking at some references and understanding them. In time, one can mentally ‘see’ i.e. visualise the object or subject in 3D space.

Pracheta Banerjee - Beauty
Lolita. Work depicting Lolita fashion, which first originated in Japan.
Pracheta Banerjee - Beauty
Yui Aragaki. A study of Yui Aragaki, its salient features being the use of light and shadow effects.

Follow no one but your own style.

According to Pracheta, there is no right way to depict fantasy paintings effectively, as everybody has their own different style and method, and one may not work out for the other. One has to just keep practising and following their intuition. It is necessary to understand what one is painting, in order to move forward. In fantasy paintings, we usually get to see very heavily rendered works; lots of surrounding elements; colours and what not. The key is to find your own style; to break out from what has already been done. It all comes down to the final execution and what one wants to express.

Pracheta Banerjee - Beauty
Study. An effort towards practicing the application of good or unique lighting.
Pracheta Banerjee - Beauty
Mass Destruction. Cover page from artists graphic novel named 'Silence'.

Published in Issue 35

The season of the festival has started and everyone is preparing to have a unique one this time with less cash and more fun. We interview many creatives who creates promotional or calendar design each year. As most of the thing around us had shifted to digital, even calendar design and the promotion has shifted. But Yorick Pintos, a strategic consultant at studio Kohl suggests that best option would be to a mix of both, the traditional and digital media. Digital Illustrator Nithin Rao Kumblekar also shared his love for the printed calendars and emphasis on the effectiveness of it. With many unique inspirations, advice and project showcase this issue is a must have if you are interested in print design & want to understand the future of the same.

 

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Graphic designer, Itu Chaudhuri, lets out his experience and insight in the field of branding. He expresses what goes into creating effective brands, and the various aspects or elements that play a role in the process.

Branding
The Wild Stone Code Range.

CG. What is the relationship between the product and the branding? How does the former shape or inspire the latter?

IC. For some brands, the product’s properties are the heart of the brand. For example, we know Mercedes by their cars, which are a model of stability and Germanic engineered perfection; not by their advertising or showrooms or their F1 Cars (which they do very well). For those brands, branding needs to reflect what’s special about the product, but rarely reflects the product itself. The ‘what’s special’ part, in turn, depends on the category. For more functional products, it’s about a clear benefit from using it (e.g. relieving pain).

Branding
The Real Tea Range.

For less functional brands, the benefit may be more in the mind i.e. how it makes people feel, or its ‘values’ (what it encourages its customers to believe in). This is also true for brands, which we know by their advertising more than by the special qualities of the product (e.g. a mobile service like Vodafone or Airtel). But, rarely does the branding show the product itself. If the product is a packaged product that’s never unpacked (think deodorants, or insect repellents, or a fizzy drink), then the branding and the product are practically fused (even when large advertising budgets support the brands).

Branding
Branding
Branding
Eicher Live.

CG. According to you, How and to what extent, does branding impact an audience?

IC. Every customer knows that they are being manipulated. So, branding works best when it slips under the radar of the customers or escapes their ‘crap detector’. Yet, if the brand seems to admit this while managing to charm the customers, it works. The audience is then willingly helpless to resist. This means that the branding is, in some sense, invisible when it appears to belong or be inevitable as if there was no other way it could have appeared. This requires honesty on the owner’s part and linking the brand to what is true. Despite this, it’s carefully orchestrated. Simply appearing artless won’t do it. Done right, it can succeed in disarming the customer.

Branding
The Almirah.
Branding
The Almirah.

CG. What do you do to ensure that the brand character comes across fully in the final design?

IC. Personality is the key, and thus cannot be overlooked or sidelined at any stage. It’s a mental model of the brand that describes the brand’s character and attitude, more like a representative, and thus implies its appearance.

Brand applications for ‘Hired’.

CG. What do you feel should be proportion, or how much is the need for balance, between minimalism and complexities in a design?

IC. The point isn’t a balance: it’s more a purposeful imbalance. Different brands need different treatments, so that one may do best in a minimal style, and another with a busy, or even chaotic style. This is a necessary facet that one needs to recognise and remember throughout the process.

Branding
Annual Report Design for IDFC.
Branding
Branding
Branding
Branding
Branding

CG. What do you feel is an essential part of branding?

IC. Deep understanding of the client’s truth is fundamental and most essential, but making sure that it’s attractive to their customers is of value, at the same time. If you succeed on the first count and fail on the second, you touch no one. The other way around, and the attraction will be skin deep. It very clearly is a case of both or nothing.

Branding
Publication design for Breakthrough.

Published in Issue 38

This issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

 

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Here is our 2017 collection of illustrations by Lokesh Karekar, Wallcano, Shreya Gulati and Ranganath Krishnamani, that well describe and represent, thorough current context, the significance of the day India marked its independence after a long freedom struggle.

Celebrate this Independence Day with free, easy to download mobile and desktop wallpapers of
the displayed artwork.

Freedom Fighter

Independence wallpaper 2017

We ought to remember all those souls that readily offered themselves in life and death to the Indian’s freedom movement. Hence all the leading icons of the nation’s freedom, in their iconic poses.

By Lokesh Karekar locopopo.com

Desktop Version: [lana_download id=”22011″]

Mobile Version: [lana_download id=”22018″]


Young India – Vibrant India

Independence wallpaper 2017

Young India, today, is synonymous of ‘Digital India’, where most things are expressed via hashtags. Thus depicting, hereby, the vibrant, positive and liberating tastes and trends of the nation’s youth, symbolised by one of its most insisted pursuits, gender equality.

By Wallcano wallcano.in

Desktop Version: [lana_download id=”22020″]

Mobile Version: [lana_download id=”22023″]


Light My Fire

Independence wallpaper 2017

70 Years of independence, yet the nation’s woman is not free in its true sense, hindered by various social stigma. This illustration serves as a tribute to all the powerful, all-encompassing women empowering themselves and each other.

By Shreya Gulati shreyagulati.in

Desktop Version: [lana_download id=”22026″]


A Dialogue

Independence wallpaper 2017

The splendor of the dialogue between the current times and storytelling monuments of the past is bygone with the splendor of the modern digital era, submerged in the glamour of the ‘selfie’—Hemakuta hill, Hampi, of 14th century Vijayanagar empire.

By Ranganath Krishnamani liquidink.design

Desktop Version: [lana_download id=”22024″]

Mobile Version: [lana_download id=”22025″]

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