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Siddhi Ranade

With a Commercial Arts from L. S. Raheja School of Arts, Mumbai, Siddhi Ranade explored new styles and developed a taste for stories while working with Ravi Jadhav Films. Later, as a Faculty at B. S. Bandekar College of Fine Art, Applied Arts, Mumbai, he strived to create a new generation of illustrators and visualisers with a sense, sensibility and better understanding of the society.


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Each year around this time, many fresh young talented designers come out as design graduates to join the best of studios and agencies. Despite many find the perfect fit for their talent but still majority faces many dilemmas and questions. So with this issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

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Aman Rajwansh

Aman Rajwansh, born in 1990, Punjab, is self-taught graphic artist living and working in Chandigarh. Having never gone to any art school or college, he is nonetheless able to practice his hobby as his profession, working with illustration and vector art.


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Each year around this time, many fresh young talented designers come out as design graduates to join the best of studios and agencies. Despite many find the perfect fit for their talent but still majority faces many dilemmas and questions. So with this issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

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Suraj Kumar

It’s been a year and a half of creating and displaying his abstract paintings for designer Suraj Kumar; after having completed his B.A. he has been exploring his creative potential using all kinds of mediums and learning more about art by working with new and upcoming artists. He is currently waiting to apply for a post-graduation course in a good design college.


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Each year around this time, many fresh young talented designers come out as design graduates to join the best of studios and agencies. Despite many find the perfect fit for their talent but still majority faces many dilemmas and questions. So with this issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

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Sumeesh Chempoor

We usually hear of two types of designers: the self-taught and the formally trained. Animator, Sumeesh Chempoor is both; his fascination for design pushed him to work as an animator right from the age of 19. After a couple of years he left his job to pursue his education. He learnt a great deal about art and also met his life partner. After working with Saatchi & Saatchi, Bangalore and Asiavision, Dubai, then he moved back closer to home working as Art Director, in Origami Creative Concepts, Bangalore.


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Each year around this time, many fresh young talented designers come out as design graduates to join the best of studios and agencies. Despite many find the perfect fit for their talent but still majority faces many dilemmas and questions. So with this issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

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Packaging has gradually evolved from cardboard boxes or covers to keepsakes. As people realise the creative hard work behind beautiful packs, this hidden space is burgeoning to become a field full of innovation and potential. Isabela Rodrigues, a designer from Brazil, takes us inside the box with her out of the box philosophy.

packaging design
JJ ROYAL PITCH. A clean, clear and modern container design for Indonesia’s purest coffee grains reinforces the enriching experience.
packaging design
CG: Gone are the days where a label was slapped on a plain and ordinary packaging. Your packaging designs make the product look exciting and inviting. What do you try and achieve through your designs?

IR: The goal of packaging design is to turn projects into collectable and saleable items. These ideas translate everything we do and our way to achieve the final result. The objective is to prevent the user from throwing away the packaging and decorate his/ her house with it instead.

packaging design
KRÄFTIG. Packaging resembling real exquisite fruit shapes is employed to showcase this premium Brazilian juice brand. Can’t get more real than this.
packaging design
CG: What is it that excites you most about packaging design? What are the challenges that you face? Do you decide the fate of packaging design, or is someone else in control?

IR: The most exciting aspect of packaging is tactile designing and how it follows a simple function of conserving the product, selling it as well as enchanting the audience. The biggest challenges are the suppliers and the limitations to achieving the result we look for. Frequently, clients that are in product-testing phase need packaging on a small scale. In that case, one has to migrate to simpler solutions that are available in the label/bottle segment. In this way, working to conciliate innovative and beautiful designs within those limitations enhances a designer’s abilities and experience.

packaging design
packaging design
PETIT – NATURAL JUICE. These fun collectable juice packaging was developed especially for children using a tetra pack design in a sustainable manner that can be reused and recycled.
CG: Your designs are clean, minimal and follow a discipline, quite contrary to the Brazilian spirit which is known to be loud and colourful! How has Brazil influenced your designs?

IR: Brazil is renowned for its colours and aesthetics no doubt. However, the objective here is to try to be a studio with a personal and also a global aesthetic. The goal is to fit into each costumer’s reality and identity.

packaging design
JUICE MEDS. This natural fruit juice line that contains vital vitamins uses an interesting health based concept to break through traditional juice packaging designs.
packaging design
GOT MILK? Unique colour combinations are used to make milk a fashionable drink
CG: Packaging design is still an unexplored territory. According to you, what are some of the traits of good packaging? What do you do differently to make your designs stand out?

IR: There certainly is a long way yet to go before packaging design becomes a celebrated design field. There is so much more potential for innovation and creation in this field. A good package must conserve the product, have a structure, sell and enchant too. It’s vital to understand that one can’t do without the others; there’s no use in a beautiful but fragile package or even a rigid one that doesn’t show the concept of the product.

packaging design
LE CHAT. This packaging design for a French brewery showcases how designers can exercise complete freedom by breaking paradigms simply to delight the eyes
packaging design
NELEMAN. Minimalism with a touch of the classic vintage glass bottle makes for an ideal way to showcase chocolate milk for this Dutch company.
packaging design
TIÍLIN CACAO. The design exemplifies the essence of Colombian chocolate making by using traditional Cacao tree visuals to take the user through that very journey.
CG: And now something we’ve been dying to ask- why bottles?

IR: Why not bottles? Nowadays, many people are creating new products by quitting their conventional jobs, and the beverage industry is the one experiencing this the most. Alcoholic or not, this form of packaging is in constant demand.

packaging design
DELÍRIO TROPICAL. This branding and packaging design refreshes the identity of a popular local restaurant known for its natural anDd healthy appeal.
packaging design
FROO.IT. The design presents the fruit drink in a fun manner by using ludic and fashion illustrations to compose the branding and packaging.
packaging design
MANJOOR ESTAT E+NYFW. This fashionable and luxurious bottle design captures the essence of spiced beverages by Manjoor Estate in conjunction with New York Fashion Week.

Published in Issue 26

Packaging is the first vital step towards enchanting the audience. Who doesn’t like a cute box or a trendy bottle? With this issue, Creative Gaga lets the cat out of the box to reveal the world of packaging design. Featuring various local and international designers like Petar Pavlov from Macedonia and Brandziac from Russia, Elephant Design and Impprintz from Pune, the issue promises to be a keepsake for many.

 

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Isabela Rodrigues

With over a decade of experience, Isabela Rodrigues is a Brazil based designer specialising in tactile packaging and structural designs. With her own design studio, she aims to break barriers and reach out to the contemporary world.


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Packaging is the first vital step towards enchanting the audience. Who doesn’t like a cute box or a trendy bottle? With this issue, Creative Gaga lets the cat out of the box to reveal the world of packaging design. Featuring various local and international designers like Petar Pavlov from Macedonia and Brandziac from Russia, Elephant Design and Impprintz from Pune, the issue promises to be a keepsake for many.

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It’s a long way from an idea to an animated film. Particularly when you are creating your characters, environment etc. and then animating everything to come up with a nice narrative. Animation filmmaker Sonia Tiwari experienced that journey while making the short film ‘Bhavri’. She explains the process.

Storyboard and Animatic

Assuming that a solid story and basic character descriptions are in place, the first and foremost helpful thing in animation is a series of storyboards to visually put together the shots in progression. An animatic is putting storyboards on the editing timeline along with corresponding sound effects, voiceover and dialogue. It helps in getting an idea of timing, pacing, acting choices etc., which are very essential for animation.

Shot Analysis

Each shot must have a motivation. Before animation begins one must know the background story of characters, their body language, emotions, physical action, what needs to be conveyed in this shot and what is the time limit for the shot etc. If the shot needs to be for only 4 seconds, we need to cut down on the amount of physical action and make sure there is just enough animation to convey the emotions clearly.


3D Animatic

If one has a 3D animation pipeline, it’s important to begin with a 3D animatic or pre-viz reel, where we assemble all 3D assets such as models, rigged characters, stage setting, props, lights, textures etc. and block all the camera angles. This helps in animating to a camera, making one only animate stuff visible in the renderable camera, instead of animating everything there is in the scene. An important tip is to ‘reference’ all 3D assets in the scene, instead of importing them, so that it is easy to update modifications made to original assets.


Animation Thumbnails

Animation thumbnails can be inspired by the storyboard, but here is where the animator really breaks down the animation and plans out the use of animation principles like weight, anticipation, exaggeration, timing, pacing etc. Using video reference, acting out in front of a mirror, noting down the timing etc are all great resources to draw thumbnails from.


Animation Blocking

This is the first step in taking all the previous animation homework and putting it into the scene. In a 3D pipeline, many animators block the animation with a stepped tangent (used in Maya), block holds and gets the timing as accurate as possible. This is where all the ‘key-poses’ are blocked out and in most cases, all body parts are keyed together. Nothing is offset as of now, just to get a neat view of the overall action. Some animators find it easier to use spline tangents (used in Maya) right from the blocking stage. It all depends on individual convenience.


Animation First and Second Pass

This is where we layer in details in the blocking. For example, if a character is jumping and landing, both feet won’t land at the same time, they will now be offset. While in blocking we only blocked the key poses, now is the time to offset, add in-betweens, expressions etc. It’s all about getting the emotion right and balancing holds with motions.


Feedback Cycle

Ask your fellow animators or seniors for feedback, fix the shots, ask for feedback again and again till the fixing is finally done. One must also know the overall production deadline to know when to stop taking feedback and hit the render button. No shot is done 100% but it needs to be good enough for the production schedule and project requirement.


Final Animation

Accumulating all feedback and references, fixing and layering details in animation, bringing it as close to the director’s vision as possible, letting it go through post-production process and making it fit just right in the overall sequence, makes a shot final.

Published in Issue 13

Coming from a country of stories and storytellers, Indian animation professionals are sitting on a gold reserve. Yet, we are miles behind the Western world. We spoke to few leading names to find out the reason and understand the Indian animator’s sensibilities and practices The house unanimously opined that we need to develop more original ideas and also create exclusive stories for animation, rather than going the other way round.

 

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Visual Design
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A powerhouse of talent when it comes to visual design, particularly creating animations represented in the form of stories, films or comics. Having worked within multiple design domains in India and the US over the last decade, Sonia Tiwari brings a global perspective to her projects. Currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Learning, Design, and Technology, she is focusing on bringing together art and early education.


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To most, the ‘tip’ represents or signifies only a minuscule portion of a greater and large phenomenon; an ending, rather, tapering merely into a limited possibility where potential draws to an end. For a few others, though, the tip is just enough, and all that they really need. Salavat Fidai is one amongst the latter. In fact, for him, graphite tip is a whole world; it is an entire playground, and that is where he lets his skill, imagination and aptitude flourish.

Graphite - Salavat Fidai
Night King

Hailing from Russia, Salavat is a sculptor known over and around the world for his miniature sculptures that he carves out of pencil graphite. Yes, you read it correctly: an entire sculpture on just the tip of a pencil. Fidai, however, was not always an artist to the extent he now is, and the way is recognised or known to be the world over. Initially a lawyer by profession, he spent 20 years as one, while only dabbling (not as a professional) in his art. It was only then that he made it a decision to work full-time as an artist, looking for greater personal expression.

Graphite - Salavat Fidai

Digital photography was the main medium through which he actually made his entry into what he has now graduated to doing. It was in 2014 that Fidai began exploring different forms of art. While practising this, in the process, he bumped into miniature paintings. He thus started out with miniatures of sources that are considered to be timeless and classic in their very nature and existence: Van Gogh paintings, for example. He, however, would manifest these miniatures not on pencil graphite, but on anything and many things that were tiny enough, such as pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, and matchboxes, as well. Further, pencil graphite came on to become the medium of his work, primarily.

Graphite - Salavat Fidai
The Titan of Braavos

There are not many individuals practising this form of art, owing to the tedious, demanding, time-consuming process, which can be a stern and sturdy test of one’s attitude and patience. The tips are of the graphite pencils are, anyway, very tiny and fragile. The intricacies that are involved in the final output are rather intense and, at the same time, also not very easy to master in a short period of time. One requires resilience, perseverance and, of course, endeavour. Salavat Fidai, definitely, has them all.

Graphite - Salavat Fidai
Dragon
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Salavat Fidai

Salavat Fidai is a Russian artist, born 1972 in the foot of the Ural Mountains in Russia. After 20 years of working as a commercial lawyer, he took back to art, his true calling, going out to find himself. Today, he creates some of the best kind of work there is in his chosen genre of art i.e. carving miniature sculputres on the tip f a pencil, amongst other forms.


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