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If you’re talented, you will be noticed. The world is full of freelance opportunity these days, just that one must know which and when to take one. A successful designer is one that find his/her niche in the design world, believes young illustrator Ashish Subhash Boyne. Here, he tells us how showcasing everyday stories in a refreshing manner can open doors to a ‘not so every day’ life!

Freelance
AGHORA.
Freelance
AGHORA.

Find inspiration in everyday things that are omnipresent

People often pass by without taking notice of things that they encounter every single day. For executing story illustrations, these are the places you need to look. The skill is to give mundane life a refreshing and ‘never seen or heard before’ appeal. Like Surmai that showcases the story of a small boy who lives near fishing docks or 100 Kisses that shows how a cup of tea passes through so many people of different backgrounds. Just keep in mind, the purpose of the work is to be understood by everyday people. The execution needs to be simple. Don’t forget that fantasy is all around and finding a unique niche is the key to getting recognised.

Freelance
AGHORA.
Freelance
AGHORA.

Education prepares the talent within you

Most people are born with certain talents that define their future. Ask any designer to take a peek back into their childhood; they’d tell you they loved things like drawing, comics and imaginative forms. As you go grow up and finally get into school to do what you love doing, you start to understand yourself better. The vague question of ‘what do you want to do?’ starts to become clearer. Illustration art needs high observation of the subject matter that needs to be combined with your skill to visualise and express the idea in a simpler way. Studying design helps you do that. It also leaves you an initial portfolio that introduces you to the outside world.

Freelance
SURMAI.
Freelance
SURMAI.

The outside world is a self-learning experience

The transition from a student to a professional is a gradual process where change settles in with time and comes the wider understanding of client needs, concepts and ideas. Hard work, dedication and passion are the three key attributes that you need to bring to the class every day of your professional life.

Freelance
100 KISSES.
Freelance
100 KISSES.

A satisfied client is a gateway to the freelance career

When you’re just about to start off to try and make a mark for yourself in the big world of design, often most people wonder ‘How do I do this?”. It’s simple. Concentrate on things that come to you. Whether it’s your first assignment or project it’s important to make each and everything you do unique and fulfilling as per the client’s requirements. The rest is history.

Freelance
100 KISSES.

Published in Issue 22

Dedicated to the talented design graduates who are not just looking to work but seeking experience in order to realise the greater goal of life. The issue features various designers from India and abroad. Kevin Roodhorst from The Netherlands realised his goal so early in life that propelled him to start his career as a designer as young as 13. Ashish Subhash Boyne, a student of Sir JJ Institute of Applied Art realised his dream while studying when he started doing freelance projects, which allow him to express his free thoughts. To name a few talents we have Vivek Nag from Fine Arts from Rachna Sansad Mumbai, Simran Nanda from Pearl Academy New Delhi, Anisha Raj from MAEER MIT Institute of Design Pune, Giby Joseph from Animation and Art School Goa and much more. This issue gives a fresh perspective of talented graduates and their unique approach to design.

 

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The Netherlands might be below sea-level, but when it comes to design, it’s right up there! Digital artist, Kevin Roodhorst, believes in developing concepts and working on a central element. Here, he takes us on a tour of his design that has helped bag various international exposure.

designer
ENERGY.

CG: Tell us about your evolution as a designer? What made you choose this career path? What do you enjoy most about what you do?

KR: I started around the age of 13, making a mixtape and album covers for artists I liked. After receiving a lot of positive comments I was motivated to keep photoshopping. I graduated in 2012 as a Graphic Designer and currently work at a post production studio called Souverein for almost 2 years. Becoming a designer was a natural choice. I loved how one can create in Photoshop and develop creative ideas. I enjoy the freshness and freedom that comes with this profession.

designer
VISION.

CG: Most of your designs focus on human forms and faces. Is that your style or is it coincidence? What are key elements you always use in every design? What are your inspirations?

KR: It’s not really what I would call style. I simply love working with eye catching elements or models and manipulating them furthermore. And it’s just a coincidence that most of the time it happens to be a beautiful female model with a mysterious expression. Beauty can never escape any eye, can it? And just like a central plot in a book, placing the element right in the center of the canvas helps in making the artwork hard-hitting and comprehendible. As for inspirations, surfing the web is it. There are plenty of inspiration websites floating around like: fromupnorth.com or abduzeedo.com or behance.net. Another thing to explore, that’s interesting and inspiring, is the work of other artists online.

designer
MESMERISED.

CG: You mainly focus on designing for advertising. How do you use your design to put your own idea into it? How much freedom are you given? How often do you feel restricted?

KR: The amount of freedom you get depends on the client and the brief. But most of the time, they want me to work on their project because of my style and strengths. Hence, the restriction is not so often present as much as freedom is. But at the end of the day, one has to understand that it’s not personal work and that appeals differently to each and every one. When the client comes back with feedback, changes need to be made even if you’re not satisfied with it. I guess this is a universal truth!

designer
FIORITURA.

CG: Being a freelancer at such a young age, how do you manage to get assignments and projects? Have you worked on some international projects?

KR: I’m glad to be living as a designer in the time of social media. As you might have already guessed, most assignments are obtained via social media, mainly Facebook and Behance network. Once you get your name out there the rest of it happens on its own. Before you know it, you become viral and at that point of time it doesn’t matter where in the world you are. That’s how my portfolio has assignments that are international. I regularly work for clients in Brazil and Canada.

designer
ONLY TIME.

CG: How is it being a designer in The Netherlands? Is there a lot of competition? How do you feel your skills and talent stand out from the rest?

KR: I think that I’m lucky to be a designer in The Netherlands because there are enough companies offering work and looking for talented designers. I didn’t noticed much competition when looking for work. It’s really important to start as soon as possible by landing a job with a design company instead of staying at school. In this creative sector, you don’t learn much at school. You have to figure it out yourself.

designer
ASTRONAUT.

CG: Where do you see yourself in the next five years? What is your dream project that you’d love to do at some point in life?

KR: In 5 years, hopefully I’m still working at Souverein with much more knowledge and experience! My dream project would be to work for a client such as Discovery or National Geographic.

designer
TRANSCENDENCE.
designer
TRANSFORM.

Published in Issue 22

This issue is dedicated to the talented design graduates who are not just looking to work but seeking experience in order to realise the greater goal of life. The issue features various designers from India and abroad. Kevin Roodhorst from The Netherlands realised his goal so early in life that propelled him to start his career as a designer as young as 13. Ashish Subhash Boyne, a student of Sir JJ Institute of Applied Art realised his dream while studying when he started doing freelance projects, which allow him to express his free thoughts. To name a few talents we have Vivek Nag from Fine Arts from Rachna Sansad, Simran Nanda from Pearl Academy, Anisha Raj from MAEER MIT Institute of Design, Giby Joseph from Animation and Art School and much more. 

 

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Martin Ravva

With 14 years of industry experience in the field of advertising and digital media, Martin Ravva currently works as an Associate Creative Director at OgilvyOne Mumbai. Inclined towards arts since his early years of schooling, he’s got varied experience in the fields of print, tv, web and animation.


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The issue explores a topic which is close to every designer, the Business of Design. We try to understand from the experienced ones that when is the right time to open own studio and what more you should get in your toolbox before taking the plunge! We had interactions with many talented studio founders like Rajesh Dahiya, Archan Nair, Ishan Khosla, Prasun Mazumdar and Anupam Tomer. Also featuring some of the best talents around the world such as Martin Grohs from Germany and Avi Sehmi from Canada along with Sourajit Sengupta from New Delhi. This issue not only provide answers to many questions but also initiate many new ones to explore further! We hope you will enjoy exploring the possibility of your studio with this issue. Happy reading!

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Prasun Mazumdar

Prasun Mazumdar is a Visual Artist and a Communication Designer. A graduate in Graphic Design from NIFT back in 2008, he founded Prasun Mazumdar Design, a graphic design studio in the year 2010 that has worked with renowned companies like Mahindra, Carrefour, Lohia Group etc.


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The issue explores a topic which is close to every designer, the Business of Design. We try to understand from the experienced ones that when is the right time to open own studio and what more you should get in your toolbox before taking the plunge! We had interactions with many talented studio founders like Rajesh Dahiya, Archan Nair, Ishan Khosla, Prasun Mazumdar and Anupam Tomer. Also featuring some of the best talents around the world such as Martin Grohs from Germany and Avi Sehmi from Canada along with Sourajit Sengupta from New Delhi. This issue not only provide answers to many questions but also initiate many new ones to explore further! We hope you will enjoy exploring the possibility of your studio with this issue. Happy reading!

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Self- taught Visual Artist, Illustrator and Digital Artist, Archan Nair, describes how tagging along with one’s heart and going by what one knows within, helps to create one’s best works and let the best within them flourish

ATONAL. 3D DIGITAL ART. A notorious play of plain and colours.

CG. What role do you feel the expressive use of colour plays in what you intend to convey?

AN. I don’t think of colours too much. If they need to happen, they automatically get translated into the work. And, if the visual does not require any, that too flows out. Though, I love how at the end, colours fuse together to create layers of storytelling, mystery and fascination.

Archan Nair heart
JNANI. 3D DIGITAL ART. A rather lively, vibrant stage, indeed!

CG. What idea/intention forms the core of what you depict, and which elements do you feel are essential to manifest them?

AN. My work has been a reflection of my journey, and that journey is deeply fascinated by the mystery we call existence – how everything interacts and reacts with each other, and where we all originate from; how things are not what they seem, and the more we dig deeper, the more weird and bizarre simple things seem to become, all at the same time. I love that reality cannot be understood, and the attempt to understand it is constantly showcased into what I create.

Archan Nair heart
SUBMERGED. A psychedelic illustration via Mixed Media Digital Illustration.

CG. What qualities do you feel are essential in a designer (especially, a freelancer) to regularly garner commissions/clients?

AN. Just be yourself. Do what you love; create to your heart’s content. I don’t think there is any particular way of getting clients, or any fixed method. If your work is true and original, and someone likes it so much so that it would enhance their project, they would definitely hire you. It’s very simple, I deeply believe, in my experience.

PSYMBIONIC. Digital Illustration of human and the subtler elements of being human.

CG. How do you choose your clients? Or clients choose you?

AN. It’s a two-way process, I think. Many-a- times, there are enquiries from potential clients who want to hire you because they like your work, but want something entirely different for themselves. At this point, I understand the direction and then take a call. If it is absolutely different from my direction of work, I would not like to continue. So, yes, it has to be a mutual collaboration between both sides to make it really exciting.

Archan Nair heart
OTHER SPACES. Digital Illustration of the ferocious tiger.

CG. What do you feel is the balance between marketing, portfolio and quality of work when it comes to acquiring work? Do you think there’s anything more a designer needs to do?

AN. I just feel that the only thing required is to create from your heart. The rest are just human-made ideas and concepts, which will anyway happen on their own. There is no need to focus on anything but create and share what you like. Whatever else needs to happen, will happen. We tend to focus too much time on constructing strategies, but nothing works unless you love what you are doing, and that is all that one needs to do.

IGNITE. Digital Illustration of an Owl, a symbolically mysterious creature.

CG. What would be your advice to freelance illustrators on getting clients without needing to be pitch-oriented?

AN. One needs to just focus on their heart and practice their own work, and not follow any trend, look, style or direction. If your work speaks to potential clients, they would definitely love to work with you.

SHAMAN’S WHISPER. Digital Illustration of the majestic wolf.
client

Published in Issue 37

The issue includes interactions with Preeti Vyas from VGC on ‘How to pitch for clients or retain the existing one’ and Ashish Deshpande from Elephant on ‘Challenges of working with a startup’, along with some best freelancers like Archan Nair, Shreya Shetty and Paul Sandip, sharing their knowledge of working with various clients. Also, Sachin Puthran from Thatzit.com gave a 10-point no-nonsense guide for studios to handle their finances. A must read, if you are planning for the financial year ahead or worried about your handling your money matter, this issue can give you much-needed insight and guide you to a better financial health of your business or freelancing. 

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Kevin Roodhorst

A self-made and self-trained creative artist, Kevin Roodhorst started his experiments with photoshop from the young age of 13 and soon after started freelancing. Much later, he enrolled in a 3 year design course in Amsterdam. He then started working fulltime for an advertising company for 3 years and now works in a creative advertising studio in Amsterdam.


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This issue is dedicated to the talented design graduates who are not just looking to work but seeking experience in order to realise the greater goal of life. The issue features various designers from India and abroad. Kevin Roodhorst from The Netherlands realised his goal so early in life that propelled him to start his career as a designer as young as 13. Ashish Subhash Boyne, a student of Sir JJ Institute of Applied Art realised his dream while studying when he started doing freelance projects, which allow him to express his free thoughts. To name a few talents we have Vivek Nag from Fine Arts from Rachna Sansad Mumbai, Simran Nanda from Pearl Academy New Delhi, Anisha Raj from MAEER MIT Institute of Design Pune, Giby Joseph from Animation and Art School Goa and much more. This issue gives a fresh perspective of talented graduates and their unique approach to design.
Every designer wish to be independent and willing to jump into the word of freelance but most of them unaware of the fundamental challenges of the initial phase. So, we dedicated this issue to freelancers and interviewed some established and talented designers to dig deep for the expert advice.While illustrator Ritban Das, Pankaj Gole and digital artist Gajanan D. Nirphale shared their experience and advantage they get to be a freelancer. Kevin Roodhorst on the other hand, an experienced freelancer from Amsterdam, has recently shifted to be a full-timer with an Agency says “Freelancing is not all roses!” and shared the best way to survive as a freelancer.</p> <p>Lavanya Naidu, another expert freelance illustrator & animator, shared more specific key points to grow as a freelancer and manage the most crucial factor, ‘finances’. She also advises to start investing little amounts and save for the rainy day!</p> <p>This issue is packed with everyone’s share of advise for a freelancer while keeping it open for you to play as per your own rules. So, whether you are a freelancer or planning to be one, this issue is a must-read. Go ahead and order your copy here or subscribe to not miss any future issues!

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Ashish Subhash Boyne

A fresh graduate from Sir JJ Institute of Applied Art, Ashish Subhash Boyne is an Illustrator and Graphic designer based in Mumbai, who recognised for his work at an early age.


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This issue is dedicated to the talented design graduates who are not just looking to work but seeking experience in order to realise the greater goal of life. The issue features various designers from India and abroad. Kevin Roodhorst from The Netherlands realised his goal so early in life that propelled him to start his career as a designer as young as 13. Ashish Subhash Boyne, a student of Sir JJ Institute of Applied Art realised his dream while studying when he started doing freelance projects, which allow him to express his free thoughts. To name a few talents we have Vivek Nag from Fine Arts from Rachna Sansad Mumbai, Simran Nanda from Pearl Academy New Delhi, Anisha Raj from MAEER MIT Institute of Design Pune, Giby Joseph from Animation and Art School Goa and many more. This issue gives a fresh perspective of talented graduates and their unique approach to design.

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When it comes to design, the first impression is always the last impression. Your users may like your website, but how do you make them fall in love
with it?

All roads to this question leads to the human centered design approach where designs are created keeping the user in mind. Every designer worth his salt knows that appealing and practical interfaces helps their client reel in the users. Ideally an interface should be like a personal guide answering questions that users are looking for instantly without confusing them and thereby enhancing their experience.

And this is where Microinteractions come into play. They acknowledge the users and give them the necessary feedback in real-time by making them understand the current process, thereby making the interface more interactive. They are sort of omnipresent, they are everywhere, from turning off your mobile to loading a video. Maybe they can go unnoticed at times but one thing’s for sure: their proper use (or misuse) can make or break a product.

In the UX/UI world, although tiny, microinteractions are touted as the powerhouse when it comes with communicating with the user. Below are top seven microinteractions and their impact on user experience by Shiv Shankar, UI Designer, Lollypop Studio:

1. Swipe

The Swipe action eliminates tapping and is much more interactive and smooth. It helps the user quickly switch between the tabs and acquire more information about the product. Furthermore swiping is a very common gesture and guides the users subconsciously without making them think; just like we have been reading ‘Don’t make your users think’. What more? It’s insanely fun and addictive.


2. Data Input

All of us know the frustrations of setting up a password or creating an account. This action can easily raise hackles. While proactive suggestions on password strength and usage make it easy for the user to proceed ahead, some interactive interactions at the time of data input also keep users engaged with the process and help accomplish the goal.


3. Animations

Animation simply enables and improves micro-interactions. They personify good design; their presence might not be noticed but absence takes a toll on everyone. They act like a glue that helps designers make the simplest of processes interesting and addictive. But be very careful as they are meant to engage the users and not distract or frustrate them; delayed processing or introducing new style in the website might cause confusion.


4. Current System Status

It is essential to keep the user informed about the current status happening on a site or app. If the users are not informed chances are that they will get annoyed and close the site or app. Microinteractions lets the user know exactly what is going on, how long it will take the process to complete etc. Even failure messages can be humorous yet effective to retain the trust of a user.


5. Make Tutorials Interesting

Everybody is constantly seeking information, all of us. Tutorials with the help of microinteraction, guides the users about working of an application by simplifying and highlighting the basic features and important controls for easy understanding. that are important in function and required for further usage with fluidity.


6. Call to Action

Microinteractions essentially nudges the user to interact with an application or website. Call to action instils a feeling of achievement and also empathy factor in user behaviour and the best way to make your user interact with CTA is to make it engaging to entice the interest of the user.

Microinteractions

7. Animated Buttons

They play the role of information manager by letting the user know their way through your app or site. We need to pay attention to colour, shape, special effects, animations, placement and texture to make the user experience seamless.

We humans are hardwired to seek instant gratification. And it is a common tendency to overlook microinteractions in the greater scheme of things, but these are very important to get your users hooked.

Devil is in the detail- as everyone says. Small experiences and design features, like toggling between screens or highlighting a feature or popping off a new notification can make a huge difference in enhancing the user’s experience.

Every day at Lollypop we strive to improve the UX by making the UI less machine and more human. And Microinteractions definitely help us achieve this goal as they are after all designed with empathy and
users in mind!

– article by Shiv Shankar, UI Designer, Lollypop Studio

The journey and works of Jack Storms’s amidst his craft of glass sculptures.

The quote goes something like, ‘It’s never too late to follow your dreams, and there’s no time like the present to start’. Jack Storms’s beginning into fine art and his journey thereafter into glass sculpting is a fine testimony to this attitude and approach, for it wasn’t until the fairly “late” in life that Jack discovered his passion for contemporary art. At the time Jack graduated Plymouth State University with a BA in Art, focusing primarily on studio production, he was 30 years old. It was during his junior year at the University that he stumbled upon a nearby studio of a glass artist who had been producing a rare style of glass art, combining lead crystal and dichroic glass through the use of a cold glass process. This drew Jack, immensely, so much so that he delved deep into the detail of the intense and intricate process, further opening his own studio, StormWorks Studio, in 2004.

Jack’s work is a fine and apt display of class, elegance, glamour, finesse and craft, all neatly making way into and fittingly finding expression through his works. The perfection of geometry and form clearly strike out across all of his wide range of shining and shimmering pieces. The final output stands for not only being a glass art sculpture but withholding an entire symbol within or by itself. His glass sculptures represent, both literally and metaphorically, and even bear within themselves, his vision and attention to detail.

As an independent glass artist, one of Jack’s major breakthroughs and personal triumph was to have designed and created, himself, a cold-working lathe that empowered him. It provided him with the ability to transform glass into shapely forms that he would envision and desire to articulate, and thus sculpt with curves and details as has been done through generations ago through the use of a wooden medium.

This craftsmanship seems to run in his blood, as early memories of studying his father’s craftsmanship played out their role and found expression in Jack’s work. Remembering his father working for hours in his own studio with a wooden lathe, at the time, sparked Jack with the scheme of his vision. His deep longing along with a strong desire for glass art sparked him with the inspiration that leads him towards pioneering new trends and ways in the world of fine art. “Inspiration exists, but it has to find you working” Pablo Picasso.

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