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Painting characters as they are art. Discovering features that define the subject and exaggerating them is communication. Illustrator Uday Mohite explains how manipulating proportions helped him to create a caricature portrait of actor Naseeruddin Shah. 

Naseeruddin Shah
Naseeruddin Shah

Step 1.

Opened a light blue coloured A4 size document in Photoshop. Picked pressure brush size 9 or 13 and painted the canvas light blue to give it a gradient feel. This would help in sketching in the middle.

Naseeruddin Shah

Step 2.

Picked light grey on the colour pallet. Created a sketch of Naseeruddin Shah with the same brush. Kept about 30% details on the sketch. This would help in selecting the dark and light parts of the sketch.

Naseeruddin Shah

Step 3.

Gave the skin a basic tone. Mixed orange, yellow, brown and white to render a light tone. Followed by a dark tone by mixing brown and blue.

Naseeruddin Shah

Step 4.

Post the texture, worked on the details of the face.

“Mixed orange, yellow, brown and white to render a light tone. Followed by a dark tone by mixing brown and blue. Post the texture, worked on the details of the face”

Naseeruddin Shah

Step 5.

While detailing further kept a separate colour palette on the side. This would help in matching colours and guiding colour selections.

Naseeruddin Shah

Step 6.

Took note of skin texture and colour tone of hair from a reference image of Naseeruddin Shah, while working on the details. Chose ultramarine blue, greens, oranges, greys and cobalt blue as they would go with the texture on the face.

Naseeruddin Shah

Step 7.

Worked more on the details at the final stage. Painted the moustache, beard, skin texture and fold in tee. Picked brush number 31 and lightened the background to highlight the final caricature. The final caricature is done.

Published in Issue 14

We dedicated this issue to Digital Art where we explored the connection between our dreams and imagination and how the flexibility of technology can be used to document that. In his exclusive article, Android Jones explains the broader perspective of digital art. Featuring Ankur Singh Patar, Archan Nair, Harshvardhan Kadam and Aamina Shazi Arora, every article discusses how each of them has an individual way of working and yet they all look at life beyond the obvious to appreciate it’s beauty.

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UI

Lead UI Designer of Lollypop, Sathish Natarajan, highlights shifting trends of UI design and how it is making more suitable clients.

From explanatory and basic design workshops for clients, we have moved towards the ecosystem that reckons the fundamentals of design along with its criticality as a success factor. The last quarter of 2016, most of our prospective and new clients had a better understanding of UI, User Research, Wireframes and UX. Some significant points of change discussed here:

Personalisation.

Earlier stock images were the talk of the town and would suffice everywhere but as we moved ahead a lot of customisation stepped in. Client’s and studio mutually decided on custom made icons and illustrations for better communication. In fact, towards the end of 2016, we see many of the companies opting for personalised photography and videos. 2017 will definitely have the customisation and personalisation at its core with much more emphasis on videos.

Vibrant Colours.

2016 was more experimental as we saw a shift from the usage of flat colours to gradients. But, as compared to global markets, clients in India still stick to common ones and just play safe. But, 2017 is going to witness a crack on this behaviour and our favourite palette would see many changes.

Rich Animations.

2016 was interesting as we moved from static images and simple flat animations mostly text to SVG for better engagement and increased usability. In 2016 we saw few clients in India opting for this but 2017 will be swamped with high demands from clients end for animation heavy designs. In fact, 2017 would see the high usage of WebGL (a web standard created to display 3D graphics in any platform that supports OpenGL) taking the users experience to a whole new level.

Sound Design.

This is going to be a novel entry in the field of design. We expect the sound design to become integral in designing the mobile applications. Currently, only a few companies like Facebook is using this trend. The small sound on the click of comment or while selecting your smiley is a way of making the whole experience delightful and not mundane.

Mobile First.

Till mid of 2016, we saw clients opting for responsive websites with desktop being the main priority. But later, there was a shift towards mobile first approach with companies realising the importance and increased usage of mobiles. We would say this approach has been adopted by few but 2017 will definitely be all about mobile.

Prototyping.

Early 2016 clients were more concerned with the functionalities and were happy with the clickable prototypes post UX but towards the end, we see a lot of clients willing to see the design prototypes post UI before starting with the coding. We, expect the same trend to continue with more and more clients asking for the same in 2017.

Unusual Navigation.

Companies across the globe did not see much adoption to the trend of Unusual Navigation in 2016 and were mostly limited to design agencies using it for their own websites. But 2017 will be different, we expect an openness towards the non-convention designs and spiking up the tinge in experiences with more usage of this feature.

Published in Issue 36

Every year brings a lot of hope and promises. With a New Year resolutions list (which might be lost by now) and hope of everything will change for good we all welcomed 2017. This issue explored, how these changes will affect our businesses and how we can be prepared for the growth predicted by the experts. The Wise Advice section includes pieces of advice on the web, mobile apps, user interface and user experience from well-known industry experts. Arun Pattnaik, a self-learned UX & UI expert also highlighted the importance of user experience in the process of building a strong brand. This issue gives you hint about tends to keep an eye on and how to be ready for it! So not just for the business owners but also for upcoming creative entrepreneurs this one is a must read!

 

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Uday Mohite

An unsuccessful first attempt to secure a seat at the renowned Sir J J Institute of Applied Arts in Mumbai did not demotivate Uday Mohite, but instead motivated him to work harder and secure the All India 9th position in the very next attempt. He then added another feather to his hat by graduating in Master of Fine arts from the very same institute and now works as a chief illustrator for the Midday editorial and newspaper.


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We dedicated this issue to Digital Art where we explored the connection between our dreams and imagination and how the flexibility of technology can be used to document that. In his exclusive article, Android Jones explains the broader perspective of digital art. Featuring Ankur Singh Patar, Archan Nair, Harshvardhan Kadam and Aamina Shazi Arora, every article discusses how each of them has an individual way of working and yet they all look at life beyond the obvious to appreciate it’s beauty.

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Studio ABD introduces and takes us into the idea and approach behind a range of luxury watches thoroughly inspired by Indian royalty (read kings, queens, palaces and the likes).

The Nebula Palace Collection: The essential idea

One of the legacies of India’s rich and varied history, which goes far back into early antiquity, is the numerous forts and palaces that dot the landscape through the length and breadth of the country. In the popular imagination, forts and palaces are redolent of mystique, romance, pleasure and intrigue. Above all the beauty, grace, strength and substance, though these proud sentinels are living reminders of India’s breathtakingly rich civilisation and culture.

 

The Nebula Palace Collection of watches was thus an attempt to celebrate this very spirit of splendour, romance, history, stories, and royalties with unique and contemporary forms; to find harmony between its graceful past and contemporary present, and to bring a fresh look in the world of watches.

Rambagh Palace, Jaipur: The focal point

The moment you step in Rambagh Palace, you inhale the warmth of the royal energy. The Nebula collection of watches hence revolves around and stems from this space, where each room is carefully detailed; from the architectural, upholstery and furniture to even bathrooms, they all have a unique style. The overall architecture of the palace, the beautiful courtyards; the fountains, paintings, jali-work, everything building up the unique experience of Rambagh is graceful and warm, thus also finding expression in The Nebula Collection.

Palace
Illustration: Studio ABD

King-spired for the Masculine

One of the main attractions of Rambagh Palace is the Polo Bar; it displays the glamour and pride of the Royal Polo. The main feature is the characteristic fountain inside the room, with Jaipur tiles creating a mosaic artwork. It radiates the equestrian prowess and style of royal men. The fountain is a circulating royal energy for decades, and this ever-moving energy is what attracts us to its masculine form.

Palace
Illustration: Studio ABD

Inspired by the iconic fountain form in the centre of the room, RPK combines elements of the palace to create a very elegant yet iconic timepiece. It has meticulous details on the side with royal horns and a dial layered with enamel, giving the watch a highly refined look. The hand-stitched leather strap integrates with the watch as beautifully as it articulates on the wrist.

 

The solid gold case is inspired by the iconic form of a fountain in the Polo club. The case adorns the polygonal shape of the fountain and captures the essence of the story of Polo Club.

Image: Titan Company
Image: Titan Company

The back cover is also in a polygonal shape to make the entire watch-story complete from front to back. Through sapphire glass, one can see layers of amazing Swiss movement which make the experience of owning a royal story complete with best of the world elements. A true royal lifestyle. Every element is refined, with attention given to each minute detail, so that every reflection of light creates a royal aura around the wrist…

 

Welcome to the Royal Club, gentlemen.


The ‘Queen’ like elegance of the Lotus

The lotus fountain is one of the iconic forms of royal architecture. It has intrigued visitors with its beautiful arrangement of petals and water pouring onto each layer. One can find the influence of peacock motif all across the Rambagh exteriors and interiors, but the most beautiful one is in the courtyard water body with mosaic tiles.

Illustration: Studio ABD

A symbol of royalty and grace, ‘Rambagh Queen’ unfolds its graceful corolla of petals. Inspired by the lotus fountain, the iconic symbol of Rambagh Palace, this ultra feminine watch shimmers with elegantly placed stones and layers of MOP petals placed on each layer of the case. The mother of the pearl dial with peacock motif adds a further touch of charm.

Image: Titan Company

The petit and beautiful queen’s watch is an epitome of a queen’s true character. The solid gold case revels in layers of beautiful and dreamy pearl petals.

 

The stones are hand-picked and set carefully to create an unmatched experience of luxury. A royal treat, indeed.

Image: Titan Company
Image: Titan Company

We’ve seen it happen in English. But typography in Indian languages and scripts is all-together a different word game. “Apart from physical differences, there are different emotions and meanings attached to different languages” says Sabareesh Ravi. Here, he tells us what key points must be kept in mind to overcome the challenges of multi-lingual typography.

Don’t only speak the languages, but also understand them.

When you’re designing using different languages, it’s important to know how people interpret each word. It’s necessary to know the culture and character of that language. A word in Hindi would have different cultural sentiments as compared to the same word written in Malayalam. Once this is accomplished, that’s when you can truly communicate using typography. At the same time, the type of script also influences your designs. For example, English has both curvaceous and sharp independent letters which make it very flexible to work with. On the other hand, Hindi is a challenge to mould because the letters are connected with a top-line.

Indian languages
JEEVICHU POTTE BAI (Let me live brother).
Indian languages
AANA (Elephant)

Symbolism makes typography universal.

Often we see foreigners with a Sanskrit or Hindi tattoo. They don’t know the language, but it’s the meaning, the essence of that word which appeals to them. These days, many of the new generation kids do not know how to write in their mother tongue. That’s when symbolism plays its role, because every child can identify an elephant or a snail.

Indian languages
VATTAM CHUTTI (had to run around a lot)

Tap the inner psychology of shapes.

Typography is like a little game of dumb charades, doesn’t matter English or Hindi. Everyone relates certain shapes and gestures to certain meanings and interpretations. It’s very important to study the subject and also how it is imprinted in the minds of people. Just like how we use spectacles to depict Mahatma Gandhi or even a hat and moustache to portray Charlie Chaplin. Typography is about exploring such characteristics of the subject and using words to give it the desired shape. Interestingly, even when you just include 60% of a shape in a particular design, the rest of the job is done by the people themselves. Leave it to the audience to connect the dots.

Indian languages
World Kidney Day -14 March 2013

And of course, make your design fun for the viewer.

Certain rules never change in typography, no matter what. People like visuals more than words. That’s the reason why typography is such an effective form of design. Because it makes the audience believe they are looking at a visual, and not really reading. The success of typography is derived using that formula. The less it appears like words, more the chances of it being appreciated and enjoyed.

Indian languages
Hug Me

Published in Issue 19

A typography special, made up of not only Indian type designers or designers whose first love is type, but also few very talented international designers who open a totally new playground with sharing their insights and inspirations. This issue has exclusive interviews with Lucky Dubz Trifonas from Netherlands, Indian UI & type designer Sabareesh Ravi and Shiva Nallaperumal, who believes, type designers are the material providers to all the creative professionals. Also, includes a special making of Nirlep rebranding done by Elephant Design and an interaction with the ace product designer Aman Sadana.

 

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advertising - Nasheet Shadani

Acclaimed Illustrator, Nasheet Shadani, employs his experience and know-how in the field of advertising to inform us about the constantly transforming nature of the field; the factors influencing these changes, and the effects of this going advancement.

Like any other creative industry, it is about transformation.

This process of transformation has been much faster in the previous few years. The art of communication has evolved from being merely ‘announcements’ to real-time engagements. Earlier, it used to be very passive, but it is now becoming more and more active. These changes are based on the context of the social structure and related trends which existed then and the way they have become now, with respect to the current status of economy, technological leaps, means of communication, nature of aspirations and so on.

With the ongoing advent of improvised and more innovative technology, new media emerges as a byproduct of the changing scene, and with the evolution of new media, new languages and behaviours are formed and cultivated. Smart brands are those that are more open and quick in adapting to these upcoming changes. Each and every day, we are bombarded with more and more information and visuals, in all sorts of ways. Our brain automatically starts filtering information i.e. if an ad looks like an “ad”, it will be on the top of a person’s ‘ignore-this-list’.

Technology and the fast-paced culture is also changing the way we focus our attention.

According to a Microsoft research, the attention spans of people have dropped from 12 seconds (in 2000) to 8 seconds (2015). This demands a relook at how we are going to create advertising. Less text and more visuals that clearly communicate the point; videos that work without sound; messages that are delivered in the first few seconds, and worth-disrupting content are few of the advertising needs based on how people respond to ads these days.

India is coming out to be one of the fastest growing online populations.

This revolution needs to be smartly encashed. For example, on platforms like Facebook, a great idea from a small startup can reach millions of well-targeted people, through a single click. The future is going to be even more exciting.

Technology cannot save a bad idea.

No matter how technology-driven we become as a society, the pressure will always be on thinkers. A great idea put strategically across various media is the hack

Published in Issue 36

Every year brings a lot of hope and promises. With a New Year resolutions list (which might be lost by now) and hope of everything will change for good we all welcomed 2017. This issue explored, how these changes will affect our businesses and how we can be prepared for the growth predicted by the experts. The Wise Advice section includes pieces of advice on the web, mobile apps, user interface and user experience from well-known industry experts. Arun Pattnaik, a self-learned UX & UI expert also highlighted the importance of user experience in the process of building a strong brand. This issue gives you hint about tends to keep an eye on and how to be ready for it! So not just for the business owners but also for upcoming creative entrepreneurs this one is a must read!

 

Order Your Copy!

Kshitij Tembe reintroduces the memories of Italian films that contained the impact of World War II. Redesigning the posters of The Bicycle Thief, he attempts to replicate the vibe of that age.

Creating the set-up.

The Bicycle Thief stands as a symbol of the neo-realistic film era of Italy. Through the representation of this iconic classic, the intention was to personify that phase of time. Its no-nonsense style is what guided the poster-work, throughout. The unpretentious manner of the movie was the essence that needed to be captured in the work.

Establishing the sync.

The non-use of artificial sets peculiarly characterised the cinema of this genre. The film was instead shot at real-life locations in the midst of moderate societies. Paying attention to this simplistic quality, a minimalist and modern approach was chosen for the depiction – through elements such as the Typeface. A natural harmony thus arose between the movie and its representation.

bicycle
bicycle
bicycle

Creating the balance.

The bicycle subtly runs as a secondary ingredient, through the motion picture. Yet, even though it doesn’t announce itself, its significance cannot be undervalued. Hence, the poster gently broadcasts the bicycle as an important element in the story, without establishing its impact. It does so simultaneously while allowing the audience to connect the dots during the film.

bicycle
bicycle

Published in Issue 19

A typography special, made up of not only Indian type designers or designers whose first love is type, but also few very talented international designers who open a totally new playground with sharing their insights and inspirations. This issue has exclusive interviews with Lucky Dubz Trifonas from Netherlands, Indian UI & type designer Sabareesh Ravi and Shiva Nallaperumal, who believes, type designers are the material providers to all the creative professionals. Also, includes a special making of Nirlep rebranding done by Elephant Design and an interaction with the ace product designer Aman Sadana.

 

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Germany is renowned for its strong hold on history and culture. And amidst this inspirational setting, Martin Grohs, a self-taught Graphic Designer, creates concepts and not artwork. “It’s satiating to create work that encourages viewers to think about the topic.” he says. How you show it is important but what really matters is what you’re showing. He talks to Creative Gaga to throw some light on his dark mysterious designs.

CG. Your designs are dark, mysterious and a great experience. What vision, inspirations and philosophies do you incorporate in your artwork?

MG. Yes, most of my work is partially dark. But a lot of it depends majorly on the mood I’m in. I love dark images because it’s in this darkness where colours can live. I find inspiration every day, whether through friends, other artists, advertising or music. Everything I experience and see inspires me. I always want a good concept, which is the most time consuming stage of the process. Once I’ve arrived at that, I really love to create a lot of detail, so that the viewer can find something new in every detail.

germany
REBIRTH.

CG. From a talented person to a design professional, how has your journey been? How have your designs and skills transformed to stand out in the crowd?

MG. My design journey started when I was a child. Since then, I’ve constantly experimented. I’ve tried various styles, techniques, programs and tools. This was the best way to evolve as a designer, where I learnt new things and found my own unique way to improve. It’s important to be yourself. One should base their creations on one’s own expressions, feelings, thoughts and opinions and must not be dictated by external factors. This goes on to give birth to untouched ideas and concepts. And of course, with such an approach, not everyone may like what you create. But then again, that’s not the goal.

germany
EGO RIPPING.

CG. You make vivid use of effects and transformations in your images and designs. Through your professional services, how do your designs help your viewers/brands?

MG. Because I mainly work in advertising, a lot of skill and talent lies in presenting a good concept in a different, interesting and provocative manner. As a designer, a design is much more than just a good looking image. It’s about creating an image that leaves viewers pondering about the topic. At times, the concept is more important than the implementation.

germany
TRIBUTE.

CG. How has being a designer in Germany benefitted you? What special cultural traits do you work with? With internet bringing the world together, what foreign inspirations have captivated you?

MG. Customers and clients in Germany are usually very rigid and fixed. They are not open to varied and innovative ideas. That’s why, I really love to work for clients in the USA or in Asia; they are always looking for something new, something different. They are not afraid of trying and taking risks. With the usage of internet and connectivity, I believe this hasn’t only changed designers but also clients and people as well as their outlook and understanding of design.

germany
POKERFACE.

CG. What advice would you give to talented professional out there who seek to invest in their design skills and make a business out of it?

MG. It is really hard today to earn money using graphic design skills. The problem is that there are thousands of graphic designers in the world and to stand out is the most difficult thing. In such a situation, it’s best to love what you do and do what you love. Be yourself and realise yourself. Spend a lot of time to learn techniques and to improve your skills each day. Don’t do what you can but make what you cannot.

germany
THE SIXTH DAY.

Published in Issue 23

The issue explores a topic which is close to every designer, the Business of Design. We try to understand from the experienced ones that when is the right time to open own studio and what more you should get in your toolbox before taking the plunge! We had interactions with many talented studio founders like Rajesh Dahiya, Archan Nair, Ishan Khosla, Prasun Mazumdar and Anupam Tomer. Also featuring some of the best talents around the world such as Martin Grohs from Germany and Avi Sehmi from Canada, this issue not only provide answers to many questions but also initiate many new ones to explore further! We hope you will enjoy exploring the possibility of your studio with this issue.

 

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Sabareesh Ravi Indian languages

Sabareesh Ravi is an UI Architect, currently working for a UK based digital agency. With a Masters in Graphic Communication (UK) and over 5 years of experience in digital and web agencies, his projects have also been recognised with awards.


Featured In


A typography special, made up of not only Indian type designers or designers whose first love is type, but also few very talented international designers who open a totally new playground with sharing their insights and inspirations. This issue has exclusive interviews with Lucky Dubz Trifonas from Netherlands, Indian UI & type designer Sabareesh Ravi and Shiva Nallaperumal, who believes, type designers are the material providers to all the creative professionals. Also, includes a special making of Nirlep rebranding done by Elephant Design and an interaction with the ace product designer Aman Sadana.

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Kshitij Tembe is an enthusiast of details. Focusing on aesthetics and practical application, he works on typography and branding.


Featured In


A typography special, made up of not only Indian type designers or designers whose first love is type, but also few very talented international designers who open a totally new playground with sharing their insights and inspirations. This issue has exclusive interviews with Lucky Dubz Trifonas from Netherlands, Indian UI & type designer Sabareesh Ravi and Shiva Nallaperumal, who believes, type designers are the material providers to all the creative professionals. Also, includes a special making of Nirlep rebranding done by Elephant Design and an interaction with the ace product designer Aman Sadana.

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