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A bold use of colours throughout his work makes for a signature that Artist, Shinoj Padmanabhan doesn’t force. Find out more how this doodler at heart has been using technology to enhance his love of drawing.

Fascinated by Deelip Khomane’s work, artist, Shinoj Padmanabhan believes there are millions of unique styles out there. So why not be open to everything?

 

Pushing his boundaries and not being limited to the size of his canvas, has led to exploring various styles, keeping his portfolio fluid and dynamic. Subject to his mood, his work uses anything from one to the innumerable amount of colours which is also based on characteristics and attributes of his project.

 

Watch out for his straightforward visuals, they turn into prominent complexities through layers of colours and silent backgrounds!

Colours

Companionship.

Individual renderings of two colleagues fused together to represent the next stage of their lives; a gift to two colleagues who got married.

Colours

Sree Muthappan.

Dashes of colour to the folk Hindu deity, Sree Muthappan make this rendering a modern vision of the age-old depictions of the God.

Colours

Iridescent.

Adding his vivid style to a favorite look.

Published in Issue 35

The season of the festival has started and everyone is preparing to have a unique one this time with less cash and more fun. We interview many creatives who creates promotional or calendar design each year. As most of the thing around us had shifted to digital, even calendar design and the promotion has shifted. But Yorick Pintos, a strategic consultant at studio Kohl suggests that best option would be a mix of both. If you are interested in print design & want to understand the future of the same. So, go ahead and order your latest issue copy!

 

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Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

It’s been a year of the whacky; one might as well call it ‘abstract’ and ‘formless’, with open to interpretation the Brexit, Demonetisation and Trump Presidency. Yet, with an entire year in perspective, and a new one in sight, the universal feeling as always is of festivity. Especially with the jolly vibe of Christmas around lights, decorations, Christmas trees, fancy cakes that look like elite architecture, and so on.

Festivity

The festive is also time for design. In fact, it is ‘the time’ of design, as without design, festivities might have no relevance or significance. The gifts one chooses; the wrappings; what one decides to put on (be it on oneself or on the home walls); the choice of delicacies laid on the platter. Everything is precisely a design, carefully chosen after fine and careful contemplation, isn’t it? Unknowingly or unconsciously, everyone’s scrutinising the intricacies of each little aspect that gives shape to the celebration, to the best of their abilities and possibilities… with a keen eye than otherwise.

Festivity
Festivity-Unverse

This keen sense, somehow, is restricted only to our festivals. But, if you look from a larger perspective, one finds a massive festival to be in play all the time; one we do not acknowledge as much—the earth spinning perfectly (with no one wildly bouncing about or falling away–not a small deal, though that might’ve been funny); the synergy between the sun, the moon and the earth; the planetary system in perfect sync, floating with total balance in empty space; the interdependence of all life… An utterly foolproof, magnificent design, completely flawless, don’t you agree? A constant, fabulous festival that we so easily take for granted every day.

 

Life itself is a festival, a design that we get to admire and shape at the same time, if only we pay attention to it. Whether we recognise this is what matters.

 

Have a happy and joyful holidays!

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Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

‘A book shouldn’t be judged by its cover’, but that phrase does not always apply to the world of packaging. Graphic Designer, Abhishek Agarwal, explains how he turned a simple box of just sweets into one of the authentic sweets bearing the essence of India.

Traditional Sweet Makeover
Traditional Sweet Makeover

The Brief.

Sweets are not simply a delicacy, in India; they’re intrinsically linked to auspicious occasions and traditional festivals, which abundantly exist in the Indian culture. It was thus no surprise that Bangalore-based sweet shop, Kartik Mithai, desired a design makeover bearing a traditional resemblance; one that was characteristically ‘Indian’ and strongly asserted the same.

Traditional Sweet Makeover
Traditional Sweet Makeover

The Concept.

To effectively match such a need, merely design knowledge proved inadequate; it was fundamental to, at the same time, delve into Indian culture and its elements, and use clues that would effortlessly associate with traditions. This in turn, readily translated to rich colours, floral patterns, Indian symbolism and such other attributes that an Indian audience could easily relate to.

Traditional Sweet Makeover

The Outcome.

Seven themes that screamed ‘India’ were created, depicting peacocks, symmetrical forms and traditional moulds unique to the country’s history and culture, subtle yet appealing shades and the likes. On the whole, the intention was that the boxes, with their appearance, openly proclaim the sweetmeats inside as ‘Indian’ before they could even be opened.

Published in Issue 35

The season of the festival has started and everyone is preparing to have a unique one this time with less cash and more fun. We interview many creatives who creates promotional or calendar design each year. As most of the thing around us had shifted to digital, even calendar design and the promotion has shifted. But Yorick Pintos, a strategic consultant at studio Kohl suggests that best option would be a mix of both. If you are interested in print design & want to understand the future of the same. So, go ahead and order your latest issue copy!

 

Order Your Copy!
LATEST RELEASE
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Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

Joyjit Deb

Joyjit Deb is a mostly self-taught artist with an art college degree specialised in Graphic Design; currently working with J. Walter Thompson, New Delhi, he also freelances as an Indie Game Artist. His journey has been a colorful ride as his experimental nature enabled him to work in many roles over the years.


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The season of the festival has started and everyone is preparing to have a unique one this time with less cash and more fun. We interview many creatives who creates promotional or calendar design each year. As most of the thing around us had shifted to digital, even calendar design and the promotion has shifted. But <span class="il">Yorick</span> Pintos, a strategic consultant at studio Kohl suggests that best option would be to a mix of both, the traditional and digital media. Digital Illustrator Nithin Rao Kumblekar also shared his love for the printed calendars and emphasis on the effectiveness of it. With many unique inspirations, advice and project showcase this issue is a must have if you are interested in print design & want to understand the future of the same. So, go ahead and order your latest issue copy!

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Shinoj Padmanabhan

His journey started from when he was 10 years old; drawing as a child led him to graduate from the Trivandrum Fine Arts College. After a series of different job profiles he has acquired of a skill set that truly sets him apart in terms of not just in his thought and design process but also in his experimental works.


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The season of the festival has started and everyone is preparing to have a unique one this time with less cash and more fun. We interview many creatives who creates promotional or calendar design each year. As most of the thing around us had shifted to digital, even calendar design and the promotion has shifted. But <span class="il">Yorick</span> Pintos, a strategic consultant at studio Kohl suggests that best option would be to a mix of both, the traditional and digital media. Digital Illustrator Nithin Rao Kumblekar also shared his love for the printed calendars and emphasis on the effectiveness of it. With many unique inspirations, advice and project showcase this issue is a must have if you are interested in print design & want to understand the future of the same. So, go ahead and order your latest issue copy!

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Bobby Evans Kate

Telegramme Paper Company is a seaside studio run by Bobby Evans and his wife, Kate in Margate, UK. With clients such as Penguin Books, AMVDDBO, BBH, Conde Nast, and the likes, they produce an equal mix of commercial illustration and design projects, apart from self-initiated illustrations to sell via telegramme.co.uk


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The season of the festival has started and everyone is preparing to have a unique one this time with less cash and more fun. We interview many creatives who creates promotional or calendar design each year. As most of the thing around us had shifted to digital, even calendar design and the promotion has shifted. But <span class="il">Yorick</span> Pintos, a strategic consultant at studio Kohl suggests that best option would be to a mix of both, the traditional and digital media. Digital Illustrator Nithin Rao Kumblekar also shared his love for the printed calendars and emphasis on the effectiveness of it. With many unique inspirations, advice and project showcase this issue is a must have if you are interested in print design & want to understand the future of the same. So, go ahead and order your latest issue copy!

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Amongst the selected winners by Latin American Illustración 5, Luis Pinto is a Mexican graphic designer-illustrator based in Guatemala. His works usually range from brand/editorial illustrations to posters, cover art, murals and lettering. He desires to continue doing workshops & meeting-connecting with the creative community while travelling around the world.


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The season of the festival has started and everyone is preparing to have a unique one this time with less cash and more fun. We interview many creatives who creates promotional or calendar design each year. As most of the thing around us had shifted to digital, even calendar design and the promotion has shifted. But <span class="il">Yorick</span> Pintos, a strategic consultant at studio Kohl suggests that best option would be to a mix of both, the traditional and digital media. Digital Illustrator Nithin Rao Kumblekar also shared his love for the printed calendars and emphasis on the effectiveness of it. With many unique inspirations, advice and project showcase this issue is a must have if you are interested in print design & want to understand the future of the same. So, go ahead and order your latest issue copy!

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Pracheta Banerjee

Pracheta Banerjee, 22-year old Kolkata based illustrator and comic book artist, is currently pursuing a Bachelor’s degree in Multimedia at St.Xavier’s College. Painting since the age of 11, and self-taught, she’s the winner of the first Millarworld Annual by Mark Millar.


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The season of the festival has started and everyone is preparing to have a unique one this time with less cash and more fun. We interview many creatives who creates promotional or calendar design each year. As most of the thing around us had shifted to digital, even calendar design and the promotion has shifted. But <span class="il">Yorick</span> Pintos, a strategic consultant at studio Kohl suggests that best option would be to a mix of both, the traditional and digital media. Digital Illustrator Nithin Rao Kumblekar also shared his love for the printed calendars and emphasis on the effectiveness of it. With many unique inspirations, advice and project showcase this issue is a must have if you are interested in print design & want to understand the future of the same. So, go ahead and order your latest issue copy!

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Nithin Rao Kumblekar

Having begun his career as an Art Director in the advertising agency, working for agencies like McCann, Ogilvy and Triton, Nithin Rao Kumblekar has been freelancing as an illustrator for the past 6 years.


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The season of the festival has started and everyone is preparing to have a unique one this time with less cash and more fun. We interview many creatives who creates promotional or calendar design each year. As most of the thing around us had shifted to digital, even calendar design and the promotion has shifted. But <span class="il">Yorick</span> Pintos, a strategic consultant at studio Kohl suggests that best option would be to a mix of both, the traditional and digital media. Digital Illustrator Nithin Rao Kumblekar also shared his love for the printed calendars and emphasis on the effectiveness of it. With many unique inspirations, advice and project showcase this issue is a must have if you are interested in print design & want to understand the future of the same. So, go ahead and order your latest issue copy!

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LATEST RELEASE
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All that is glitters (read foreign) is not gold. So believes, Studio Kohl, a boutique studio, founded by Mira Malhotra, that reflects the Indian culture and heritage in all of its works. After all, home is where the heart is, isn’t it?

MMMPop! Studio Kohl's Diwali greeting, 2015. The Diwali traditions of gifting sweets and playing with fireworks are combined in this little box full of crackling candy.

CG. You use a lot of Indian symbolism in your works. What is your idea behind that?

Studio Kohl. It isn’t an idea, as much as a result, of a conscious decision to be inspired by what is around. Years ago, when I found myself fighting the urge to mimic western music artists, I realised that I needed to ‘think local’, and only then it’d be convincing to others. I am mainly influenced by local products, novelty items, the bazaar and folk arts. There is little use in re-doing what other people have done before, in a market that is not ours. We also have a pretty rich visual culture and a unique approach, so why forgo it? Instead, Americans and Europeans seem to value it more than we do. My biggest influence in this regard is Japan. They have a range of unique contemporary aesthetics and treatments; a visual culture all of their own, grown independently from western influences that are ever-changing

Diwali Lakshmi. A golden engraving of the Indian goddess, Lakshmi, also considered the deity of wealth. Depicted here amidst Diwali, the festival synonymous of light and prosperity.

CG. How do you apply these traditional elements, such that they suit contemporary styles of presentation?

Studio Kohl. I think of it as ‘global treatment; local content’. I am not oblivious to the steady stream of modern inspiration around me, but I like to tweak it a little; we either use content that’s local, or scripts, or even inspiration from folk art. It could be switching around a colour palette; smoothening outlines that are usually brush-stroked, or being minimal. A lot of unknown illustrators from India in the 50s to the 70s, that get little credit today, are also responsible for the influences – such as Deenanath Dalal – and make excellent sources of contemporised Indian work.

EAST INDIA DEZIGN CO. (2015). Proposed branding for EIDC, a brand of luxury Indian goods. The glory of the maharajas in a contemporary global format representing luxury.

CG. What are the challenges that cause a hurdle in balancing the Indian and modern feel, and how do you tackle them at Studio Kohl?

Studio Kohl. I think it comes rather naturally to me, as I am practised in it, but it was tougher earlier. I think, just by the fact that one can use digital modes of reproduction and interpret what you have already seen through these modes, one can create something really interesting and balanced. We don’t realise it, but a lot of the so-called visual trends are actually inspired by how one uses software or technology to achieve a visual concept. It later defines what we call ‘new’ or ‘trendy’. So, by simply using vectors, or by a certain photoshop brush or print method, the demands of those technologies contribute to something age-old and seen before, but giving them a contemporary look.

GRAZIA YOUNG FASHION AWARDS 2013. A playful and trendy illustration for GYFA 2013.

CG. How do you see Indian elements contributing to modern-day design?

Studio Kohl. I try to insert Indian elements to revive a dying culture and to preserve it. Cultures cannot be preserved in glass cases; they need to be moulded, continued and extended to remain relevant; otherwise, they are certain to die out.

ZOMBA.IN (2012). With the logo already in place, the visual language was built to showcase activities representing the B-Boying culture, with a distinctively old-school flavour.

CG. What would be the Studio Kohl’s advice to other designers who are trying to create a similar style of work as yours?

Studio Kohl. ‘Don’t just create your own work’; instead, delve into history, local crafts, etc. Let your inspiration be a journal or camera you take on your travels around India or your everyday lives. Invest in learning more about the Indian approach. You might find it rather fascinating and nothing like you’ve ever seen. Don’t continually repeat the work of foreign illustrators.

Published in Issue 35

The season of the festival has started and everyone is preparing to have a unique one this time with less cash and more fun. We interview many creatives who creates promotional or calendar design each year. As most of the thing around us had shifted to digital, even calendar design and the promotion has shifted. But Yorick Pintos, a strategic consultant at studio Kohl suggests that best option would be to a mix of both, the traditional and digital media. Digital Illustrator Nithin Rao Kumblekar also shared his love for the printed calendars and emphasis on the effectiveness of it. If you are interested in print design & want to understand the future of the same. So, go ahead and order your latest issue copy!

 

Order Your Copy!
LATEST RELEASE
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49